Wine and the City - www.wineandthecity.fr
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Rescooped by Jules Lamon from Wines and People
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Finally... Slow Wine Magazine

Finally... Slow Wine Magazine | Wine and the City - www.wineandthecity.fr | Scoop.it

Slow Wine Magazine, is the new digital magazine that aims to provide a fresh look at the Italian wine scene. The 53-page magazine, which will be published six times a year, will be put together with the help of enological experts from all over Italy.

The Slow Wine Magazine aims to offer readers a profound insight into the world of Italian wine, the world’s largest wine producing country, inspired by the cornerstone values of Slow Food. It looks at a variety of factors to evaluate wines in their entirety, taking into consideration environmental sustainability in production, adherence to terroir, craftsmanship and quality-price ratio.

“A completely digital magazine produced in English, Italian and German, it will present our independent vision of the wine world,” says Giancarlo Gariglio, one of the editors of the Slow Wine guide and magazine along with Fabio Giavedoni. “The magazine will be divided into four parts, a long section dedicated to important Italian denominations; a smaller section on a little-known but rapidly improving zones; a retrospective, in other words a tasting of several wines from one great vintage; and vertical tastings.”


Via Mariano Pallottini
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Rescooped by Jules Lamon from Wines and People
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Not a French but an Italian Monk is the father of the effervescence in winemaking

Not a French but an Italian Monk is the father of the effervescence in winemaking | Wine and the City - www.wineandthecity.fr | Scoop.it

Italians were the first to deliberately induce effervescence in their winemaking, despite the practice commonly being misattributed to the French Benedictine monk, Dom Pérignon. Contrary to popular myth, at one time an important part of his job as cellar master at the Abbey Saint-Pierre d’Hautvilliers, was to prevent a secondary fermentation in the juice under his watch.

Although fizziness in wine has been noted as far back as ancient Greek and Roman times, the first written account of its intentional creation was in 1622 by Francesco Scacchi, an Italian monk and physician from Fabriano. In his work, De Salubri potu dissertatio, he described adding sugar to wine to create bubbles, then conjectured whether they were good or bad for one’s health, including spiritual. [...]


Via Mariano Pallottini
Jules Lamon's insight:

Italien l'inventeur du Champagne ?

 

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