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Why Does Earth Have Deserts?

Subscribe to MinuteEarth - it's FREE! - http://dft.ba/-minuteearth_sub Why Does Earth Have Deserts? For the same reason it has Rainforests: Hadley Cells!!! T...

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waw0004's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:19 AM

This also would help with wind patterns

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Hurricane Humberto (2007) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hurricane Humberto was a minimal hurricane that formed and intensified faster than any other North Atlantic tropical cyclone on record before landfall. Developing on September 12, 2007, in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, the tropical cyclone rapidly strengthened and struck High Island, Texas, with winds of about 90 mph (150 km/h) early on September 13. It steadily weakened after moving ashore, and on September 14 it began dissipating over northwestern Georgia as it interacted with an approaching cold front.

Damage was fairly light, estimated at approximately $50 million (2007 USD). Precipitation peaked at 14.13 inches (358.9 mm), while wind gusts to 85 mph (137 km/h) were reported. The heavy rainfall caused widespread flooding, which damaged or destroyed dozens of homes, and closed several highways. Trees and power lines were downed, knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of customers. The hurricane caused one fatality in the State of Texas. Additionally, as the storm progressed inland, rainfall was reported throughout the Southeast United States.

The origins of Humberto are from the remnants of a frontal trough—the same that spawned Tropical Storm Gabrielle—that moved offshore south Florida on September 5.[1][2] The combination of a weak surface trough and an upper-level low pressure system produced disorganized showers and thunderstorms from western Cuba into the eastern Gulf of Mexico.[3] Tracking slowly west-northwestward, unfavorable wind shear initially inhibited tropical cyclone development.[4] By late on September 11, environmental conditions became more favorable,[5] and the following morning convection increased over the disturbance.[6] Tracking around the western periphery of a mid-level ridge, the system turned on a slow northwest drift and quickly organized. Radar imagery reported loose banding features, and buoy data indicated the presence of a surface circulation; based on the observations, the National Hurricane Center classified the system as Tropical Depression Nine, while located roughly 60 miles (100 km) southeast of Matagorda, Texas.[7]

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What is the difference between a hurricane, a cyclone, and a typhoon?

What is the difference between a hurricane, a cyclone, and a typhoon? | Wind | Scoop.it

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Hannah Burnett's curator insight, July 29, 2013 10:10 PM

Sometimes it can be very hard to actually tell the difference...

BSCBRA0047's comment, August 1, 2013 7:28 PM
I had no idea there was a difference! Thanks for sharing this informative article.
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Stronger, more frequent tropical cyclones ahead, research says - Phys

Stronger, more frequent tropical cyclones ahead, research says - Phys | Wind | Scoop.it
The world typically sees about 90 tropical cyclones a year, but that number could increase dramatically in the next century due to global warming, a US scientist said Monday.
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Current Tropical Cyclones

Current Tropical Cyclones | Wind | Scoop.it
Australian region tropical cyclone warnings, forecasts, seasonal outlooks, cyclone history, climatology and related information
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Hurricanes - The One-Eyed Monster

Hurricanes - The One-Eyed Monster | Wind | Scoop.it
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art0001's comment, July 28, 2013 1:07 AM
I think that this could be a very useful website and some very interesting information
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Global Winds

This episode of Mr. Musselman's online classroom focuses on how convection and the unequal heating of the earth leads to the formation of global wind current...

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waw0004's curator insight, July 18, 2013 7:44 PM

This is a really helpfull video as it not only shows what the wind patterns are, it explains why they happen as well.

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A Surge of Misinformation on Wind Farms and Hurricanes - Clean Energy News (blog)

A Surge of Misinformation on Wind Farms and Hurricanes - Clean Energy News (blog) | Wind | Scoop.it
A Surge of Misinformation on Wind Farms and Hurricanes
Clean Energy News (blog)
Their new model alters the perception of wind turbine resiliency to extreme weather events. However, Dr. Powell and Dr.
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