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New Smart Tattoos Let You Control Your Mobile Phone Using Your Skin

New Smart Tattoos Let You Control Your Mobile Phone Using Your Skin | IT Service Management | Scoop.it

In a recent post about biohacking, I wrote about people who have implanted chips into their bodies to benefit their health, simplify their lives, or connect themselves to an external network. Though some have been quick to adopt it, biohacking is still a relatively new and bizarre trend that makes many people wary. The thought of burying chips in our arms is unsettling, and most of us would only do it if it was medically necessary. But for those who are curious yet not quite ready to take the chip-implantation plunge, there’s now another way to join the biohacking party: temporary tattoos.

 

Created by MIT PhD student Cindy Hsin-Liu Kao in conjunction with Microsoft Research, the Duoskintattoos transfer onto your skin with water, and they can be customized for both aesthetic and functional purposes. Hsin-Liu Kao presented her paper about the tattoos at the International Symposium on Wearable Computers in Heidelberg, Germany last week.

 

The first step in creating a tattoo is to make a tiny circuit board using graphic design software. A stencil of the circuit is created by applying a layer of vinyl film onto tattoo paper, then gold leaf is layered over the stencil to act as conductive material. The last step is to surface-mount electronics. All tattoos except those with an NFC chip connect to a microcontroller that processes sensor data, supplies power, and links devices through Bluetooth. The total cost of creating a three by four centimeter squared NFC tag is less than $2.50.

 

In trials, the team tested conductive thread and copper tape as alternatives to gold leaf, but found gold leaf to be the most durable and the most skin-friendly.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, massimo facchinetti, Biomni
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Adele Taylor's curator insight, October 4, 8:45 PM

Have I missed something?

I didn't know micro-chipping your body was a thing, would you do it?

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Apple's push into healthcare now includes Apple Watch data

Apple's push into healthcare now includes Apple Watch data | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
Apple and Aetna both get something out of offering discounted Apple Watches to the insurance company's customers.

Via Carol Hancox
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Defining digital medicine

Defining digital medicine | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
Nature Biotechnology | doi:10.1038/nbt.3222

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MIT engineers human cells to store ‘memories’ in DNA | #Research 

MIT engineers human cells to store ‘memories’ in DNA | #Research  | IT Service Management | Scoop.it

Score another win for CRISPR. Scientists at MIT are using the ever-intriguing genome-editing system to engineer human cells capable of recording and reporting...

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=MIT

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 18, 2:30 PM

Score another win for CRISPR. Scientists at MIT are using the ever-intriguing genome-editing system to engineer human cells capable of recording and reporting...

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=MIT

 

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Cleveland Clinic CEO: Four ingredients in our 'secret sauce' - The Advisory Board Daily Briefing

Cleveland Clinic CEO: Four ingredients in our 'secret sauce' - The Advisory Board Daily Briefing | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
In an interview with Business Insider last week, Cleveland Clinic CEO Delos Cosgrove outlined factors that contribute to the renowned health system's success.

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AttractiveHealthcare's curator insight, December 14, 2012 4:34 AM

Un modèle pour la France ?

Jeffrey Benabio's curator insight, January 8, 2013 9:23 PM
One-year contracts and annual reviews: Universal data sharing: Creating an infrastructure around the patient: Small changes matter: 
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Continuous monitoring tools could save hospitals $20,000 per bed, report says

Continuous monitoring tools could save hospitals $20,000 per bed, report says | IT Service Management | Scoop.it

Contact-free continuous monitoring, a platform that taps into sensors to measure patients vital signs and other metrics, hold the promise to save health systems $15 billion a year. That’s according to a new peer-reviewed paper published in Critical Care Medicine. CFCM is used to monitor heartbeat, respiratory rate, ulcers and patient motion. The technology's components include sensors placed under a patient's mattress or in a chair, bedside monitor, central display station and in handheld devices. The sensors measure vibration and calculate motion, heartbeats per minute and breaths per minute, which detect any changes from regular patterns. If a patient's status changes, the platform alerts nurses through large screens set up in conspicuous locations, as well as handheld devices. Researchers from Harvard School of Medicine in a new Frost and Sullivan report entitled "Finding Top-Line Opportunities in a Bottom-Line Healthcare Market" claimed each hospital bed monitored with the EarlySense CFCM approach enables hospitals to achieve a cost savings nearing $20,000. The cost savings are attributed to clinical outcome improvements published by hospitals implementing CFCM. Evidence suggests the technology can assist clinicians in earlier detection of patient deterioration, helping to reduce patient length of stay, minimize use of intensive care units, reduce falls and pressure ulcers and avoid cardiac and respiratory arrests. The $15 billion figure was arrived at by extending the savings to all 750,000 relevant beds in the U.S. hospital system. The estimate does not take into account those patients in beds outside the hospital setting. Clinical data also estimates that use of EarlySense has the annual potential to reduce patient falls by 301,809; reduce pressure ulcers by over 1 million; slash ICU days by about 1.7 million; eliminate more than 259,000 "Code Blue" events; and avoid close to 208,000 deaths. "The healthcare industry is constantly working to improve efficiency," said Charlie Whelan, Frost and Sullivan's Transformational Health North America consulting director, in a statement. "These studies show that continuous monitoring presents a unique opportunity to create both top and bottom line benefits, while simultaneously improving quality of care." Twitter: @JELagasse


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'Virtual doctors' helping patients in Zambia 

'Virtual doctors' helping patients in Zambia  | IT Service Management | Scoop.it

The idea of a "virtual doctor" project might sound rather futuristic.

 

Zambia has about 1,600 doctors for a population of 14 million, and two-thirds of these are working in towns and cities, while most of the country's population is in the countryside.

 

It means access to good quality health care is often difficult if not impossible.

 

 

For many communities, it is not practical to expect sick and frail people to walk or cycle for hours to hospital.

 

So families depend on rural health centres, which have health workers but no qualified doctors.

 

The virtual doctors project means that these isolated health centres can be supported by doctors thousands of miles away.

 

 

Health workers and clinical officers on the ground use an app on a smartphone or tablet computer to take notes on a patient's symptoms and photographs.

 

This information is sent to a volunteer doctor in the UK who helps with a diagnosis and recommends treatment.  Cases are directed towards doctors with a relevant specialism, whether it is skin diseases or HIV and Aids-related problems.

 

The doctor in the UK will have a list of the drugs and equipment kept in the health centre in Zambia and can suggest treatment or further tests based on what is practical and available.

 

Virtual Doctors is now supporting 19 rural health centres, which typically deal with problems such as malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/Aids and pregnancy-related conditions.

 

 

 

 

 


Via nrip
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nrip's curator insight, July 7, 5:39 PM

The concept of a virtual doctor is not new, but it is one which will never get old.

 

At Plus91 we have been involved with multiple projects and pilots where simple tablet and smartphone based solutions are used by on-ground trained and sometimes untrained staff and advice, opinions, second opinions and in some cases virtual consultations are provided by remotely situated doctors and clinical staff. With time, the solutions eventually become more technologically advanced as the on ground staff get comfortable with such distributed protocols and the use of technology. This is an exciting solution as it helps provide much needed healthcare in small areas without qualified doctors. Who is to say this is not hi-tech ..for the millions who benefit from this, this is cutting edge.

 

Virtual doctor based solutions eventually evolve into distributed EMRs and local health centers become more involved.The Medixcel platform has a remote consultation as well as multi opinion module which was built out of this need and it has grown to be a platform of choice in many parts of Africa for being hi-tech yet simple. 

 

 

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Do You Really Need to Hold That Meeting?

Do You Really Need to Hold That Meeting? | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
A simple tool to help you decide.
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You’re Not Investing Enough in IT Security, Healthcare

You’re Not Investing Enough in IT Security, Healthcare | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
The fact is, most of healthcare simply doesn’t spend enough on data security.
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Motivating Millennials Takes More than Flexible Work Policies

Motivating Millennials Takes More than Flexible Work Policies | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
Make the work itself more engaging.
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13 Most Common Mistakes People Make When Giving a Speech

13 Most Common Mistakes People Make When Giving a Speech | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
Here's how to make sure your audience actually remembers what you say.
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Taking IT Operations Beyond Firefighting with ITOA

Taking IT Operations Beyond Firefighting with ITOA | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
IT is mandated to build and maintain IT environments with the highest possible availability, within budget and available resources. Challenges faced by IT Operations have intensified due to both the rapid growth in performance and event monitoring data volumes. As a result, for many IT organizations, especially with limited resources and with specialists wearing many hats, they often spend too much time fighting fires with “maintenance & support” and not enough time proactively avoiding issues l

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Lori Eddlemon's curator insight, February 17, 2015 3:57 PM

I attended an AI workshop a few weeks ago where many suggested that Firefighting and Heroism are problematic in their IT organization.  Our Splunk implementations often focus on IT Operations and working with teams to adopt a more Proactive set of processes to improve uptime.  For large and small operations alike, start with one area and then expand to get the most of your It Ops spend this year.

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Business-IT Alignment: Five Ways ERM Helps

Business-IT Alignment: Five Ways ERM Helps | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
The lack of alignment between IT and "the business" is more than just a communication issue. Here's how the ERM approach to service delivery can help.

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Tom Pick's curator insight, October 21, 2015 9:43 AM

Implementing an enterprise request management (ERM) model for service requests won't fix the business-IT alignment problem entirely on its own, but can play a key role, in several ways.

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A $280 billion healthcare problem ripe for technology innovation and predictive analytics

A $280 billion healthcare problem ripe for technology innovation and predictive analytics | IT Service Management | Scoop.it


Behavioral health is a complicated and expensive issue in U.S healthcare today. It's also a field that is underfunded and ripe for technology-led innovation.


Mental health and substance abuse treatment are on track to be a $280 billion problem by 2020. This is the tip of the iceberg. If you include untreated individuals and people with developmental disabilities, age-related conditions and so on, the magnitude of the problem is much higher. rebuiding How to rebuild your career after a layoff There is life after the layoff. Take these 6 steps to engineer your own comeback. Read Now Behavioral health (BH) issues — which include substance abuse in addition to mental health conditions — correlate with increased mortality, unemployment and homelessness, among other things. In response to the growing seriousness of the issue, the Senate health committee has announced the Mental Health Reform Act of 2016. However, BH is underfunded given the scale of the problem and is underequipped in terms of treatment infrastructure. The costs, relative to the size of the affected population, are disproportionately high: Consulting firm McKinsey estimates that this group represents 20% of the population but accounts for 35% of the total healthcare expenditure in the country today. Using data to address risks and costs As with accountable care models in population health management (PHM), the key to reining in BH costs is to understand population health risks and intervene with preventive care models that reduce costs while improving the quality of care. A couple of partnership models provide examples of how technology innovators and care providers are collaborating to address the problem. One involves the South Florida Behavioral Health Network (SFBHN) and ODH Inc.; the other involves Quest Diagnostics and UC San Francisco (UCSF). Let's take a look at both of them. The South Florida Behavioral Health Network (SFBHN) and ODH Inc. The BH sector is not well prepared to deal with taking on risk, says John Dow, CEO of SFBHN, a nonprofit that deals with the prevention and treatment of behavioral health disorders at the community level. To begin with, unlike in a medical field such as oncology, there are no registries with longitudinal data on BH patients. Additional complications include confidentiality and sensitivity to data that might hurt individuals if handled improperly (such as data on criminal history and incarceration). Aggregating the data can be a significant challenge that requires collaboration among stakeholders. To bring technology innovation to address the problem, SFBHN has partnered with ODH Inc., an offshoot of Japanese pharma company Otsuka that has developed Mentrics, a PHM platform for behavioral health. The key aspect of the platform is a risk-scoring algorithm that identifies high-risk patients for targeted intervention by using predictive analytics on medical records, behavioral health data and data on the individual’s justice issues. The latter, a major element of the program, is an outcome of the White House Data Driven Justice (DDJ) initiative that focuses on reducing incarceration and recidivism within the population. SFBHN, which has accumulated five to six years of behavioral health data, works with local hospitals to combine this data with medical records to identify and target at-risk individuals. SFBHN is careful about the confidentiality of the data and takes extreme care to comply with the government's CFR 42 regulations on the same. Quest Diagnostics and UC San Francisco (UCSF) A unique partnership between lab test leader Quest Diagnostics and the academic medical center at UCSF focuses on dementia, a $215 billion cost that is bigger than cancer and heart disease and is set to increase significantly due to the aging population. stethoscope tablet healthcare stethoscope tablet healthcare data Using a population health approach, Quest leverages its vast clinical database of over 20 billion lab test records for early detection of dementia using an integrated care pathway for diagnosis and treatment of dementia developed at UCSF that focuses on early detection and treatment. Using technology innovation, the dementia care protocol starts with a five-minute cognitive assessment test named CogniSense that is administered through an iPad application during a physician office visit. Quest’s Quanum platform, an integrated suite of healthcare information technology and predictive analytics tools, analyzes the data from the test along with other patient medical data to help primary care physicians identify patients with early onset of memory loss and dementia. Quest estimates that early identification and treatment of reversible causes of dementia saves $50,000 to $70,000 in costs by delaying admissions to assisted living centers. The rise of behavioral health startups BH is a complex and expensive issue in U.S healthcare today. This is also a sector that is ripe and ready for technology-led innovation. And the startup ecosystem is rising to meet the challenge. There are over 200 behavioral health startups today, many of them funded by venture capital. Many of these startups are attracting the attention of health insurance companies looking to rein in the costs of behavioral health in their member populations by buying innovation from the market. Some of the early providers of behavioral health solutions have already been acquired by larger insurance companies, while others have received venture capital from the investing arms of health plans. However, as in the case of digital health, many of these solutions are not based on clinical evidence and are not FDA-approved, which limits their use in clinical settings. The lack of federal funding for behavioral health may raise questions about the business viability for many of these startups. The shortage of trained mental health professionals, especially in rural areas, can be a barrier to scale as well. The recent announcement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that $44.5 million will be allocated to grow the pool of behavioral health professionals is very timely. At the same time, behavioral health is one of those fields with a double bottom line — in other words, the intended benefits are financial and social. As support for funding for behavioral health programs gathers momentum through legislation, and as behavioral health solutions mature with data, predictive models that accurately identify early onset of dementia and other conditions can have a significant impact on reducing treatment costs. As John Dow of SFBHN says, everyone will then be able to reap the benefits, however you define them


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The patient misidentification crisis - Health Management Technology

The patient misidentification crisis - Health Management Technology | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
Positive patient identification is the foundation of effective healthcare. It allows for the right care to be delivered to each patient based on his or her individual needs. Recently, ECRI Institute analysts discovered that patient identification issues were prevalent in healthcare, and these errors have significant patient safety and financial implications.1 According to research cited
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Buyers Guide: A close look at 8 population health platforms

Buyers Guide: A close look at 8 population health platforms | IT Service Management | Scoop.it


Healthcare IT News reviews software designed to provide actionable intelligence from Caradigm, Enli, Forward Health, Medicision, Medicity, Transcend Insights, WellCentive and ZeOmega.




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Health IT: Supporting Us as Caregivers

Health IT: Supporting Us as Caregivers | IT Service Management | Scoop.it

Being a caregiver is hard, but health IT can help caregivers manage a loved one’s care. From tracking multiple medications to having all your health information in one place, health IT and new mobile technology are proving to be valuable resources to patients and people like me, those of us who take care of a loved one.

As a child, I was always oblivious to the difficulty of navigating the healthcare system. My mother coordinated my care and made sure I visited the appropriate doctors at the appropriate time. That changed in 2008, towards the end of my senior year in college, when she was diagnosed with End Stage Renal Disease. I was stunned by the amount of work and the responsibilities that came to me as my mother’s caregiver and “medical home.”

For starters, I had no information about my mother’s medical history—she was the superwoman and glue that held our household together. So when I was asked about family history and who her primary care physician was, her ER nurse and doctor were met with my tears and endless blank stares.

How was I supposed to know?

The healthcare system did not care that I didn’t know and my level of readiness was not their concern. My life was transformed and from that day forward, I was dubbed caregiver—care coordinator and documentarian extraordinaire for my sweet mother.

The life of a caregiver is not glamorous—no one aspires to be a caregiver because it usually signals something has gone terribly wrong. More than 90 million caregivers across the U.S. provide nearly $450 billion worth of unpaid care annually. Many of these caregivers are full-time workers. Younger Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 make up 36% of the family caregiver population.

As a family caregiver it means the decisions you make have a direct impact on your patient’s daily comfort and their overall quality of life. We perform both complex medical and nursing services like medication management and wound care for our loved ones, but also the mundane tasks like bathing. I’m frequently responsible for coordinating her care and making sure the proper pieces of health information flow between her primary care doctor and the myriad of specialists.

I’ve essentially become my mother’s medical home, making sure that she followed up with the home care agency when she was discharged from a hospital-stay, or bringing a summary of the last doctor’s visit from her primary care physician in Maryland to her nephrologist in Washington, D.C.

There are also a number of co-morbidities associated with a disease like ESRD, so making sure she has an assigned specialist to monitor her heart, vision, nutrition, etc. was something I needed to stay on top of. Yes, she had a primary care physician, but the reality is, as a caregiver I’m much more sensitive to her needs.

Health Information Technology has been an extremely useful tool in managing/coordinating my mother’s care. The road wasn’t easy, the learning curve was steep, but I’ve been using a number of mobile health applications to help manage my mother’s overall wellbeing a little better. I am much more efficient and have learned to save a lot of time.

With the help of these different health applications, I can compile the summary notes from her visits and document questions I have about her care so that when she does need to see her doctor, the questions are well-informed and very specific. The number of readmissions due to her kidney disease and diabetes has decreased dramatically—from 14 readmits in 2011 to two only admissions so far this year. When healthcare professionals in the hospital can’t seem to talk to one another or share notes, I at least have all the up-to-date insurance information, prescription lists, and her physician contacts centralized in one place.

The other benefit I’ve experienced is with the coordination of her social services. I’ve found there’s a disconnect between the health component and human services. My mother’s diagnosis and disability meant she had to stop work. The best way to describe the coordination of social services, pre-health IT, is “baptism by fire” (no kidding). However, with mobile apps, like Blue Button, I’ve been able to do some of the financial reconciliation on her Medicare claims data, often required for some of the social services offered at the state level.

Health Information Technology can be fun (really). Health IT has helped me become more efficient—I’m now using a number of food apps to get ESRD-friendly recipes (we have to be mindful of things like acid, and potassium among other things). I’ve also downloaded applications that provide us with at-home exercises/activities.

It’s been a rewarding experience as an ONC team member. I’ve had the opportunity to use the tools and better understand the policies that are digitizing health care in a way that offers patients (and their families) better access, better health and lowered costs. As we continue our work on the implementation of meaningful use stage 2, aligning our program work with patient-centered models like ACOs and the medical home.


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Technical Dr. Inc.'s curator insight, July 8, 5:49 AM

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

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IBM Launches Lab-on-a-Chip Technology to detect Cancer

IBM Launches Lab-on-a-Chip Technology to detect Cancer | IT Service Management | Scoop.it

IBM Research teams up with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to develop Lab-on-a-Chip technology to detect cancer. IBM announced that its research scientists have developed a new lab-on-a-chip technology that can separate biological particles at the nanoscale to enable doctors to detect diseases such as cancer even before symptoms appear. IBM is working with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to perfect the technology and to test it on prostate cancer, which is the most common cancer in men in the U.S. The collaboration uses a technology developed at IBM called nanoscale deterministic lateral displacement, or nano-DLD, to separate the biological particles at nanoscale. “We expect that this device will allow us to identify cancer in patients that still have no symptoms,” said Gustavo Stolovitzky, program director for IBM Translational Systems Biology and Nanobiotechnology at IBM Research, in an IBM video on the technology.


The IBM Lab-on-a-Chip would work like a home pregnancy test. “Imagine this scenario: Annual physical examinations are supplemented by an affordable home diagnostic chip, allowing you to regularly monitor your baseline health with just a simple urine sample,” said Fiona Doherty, a content specialist at IBM Research, in a blog post. “Though outwardly you appear to be in good health, the device reveals a fluctuation in your biomarker profile, indicating the possible emergence of early stage cancer development or presence of a virus.” IBM began its nano-DLD efforts two years ago when a cross-disciplinary team at IBM Research led by Dr. Joshua Smith, research scientist and master inventor, and Stolovitzky began working on retooling silicon technology and using it to separate nanoscale-sized particles like the elements of viruses and cancers, Doherty said. The IBM Research team published details of its breakthrough this week in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. “All the processes that you would have to do to analyze a disease and get a diagnosis, in theory you could shrink that down to a microchip and do the same analysis that you would have to do with a whole lab in a hospital or a special company,” said Ben Wunsch, surface chemist at IBM Research, in the IBM video. “You could do it right on a chip.” IBM is pioneering the detection of exosomes in the process of liquid biopsies. The company is trying to detect those exosomes in a fast and cheap way, Stolovitzky said. “Exosomes are little vesicles on the order of 20 to 100 nanometers, which is the size that our devices can handle,” he said in the video. “They are very, very small – 100,000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair.” A “liquid biopsy” can be obtained from urine or saliva samples. Then tiny particles need to be separated for downstream detection of a disease, Doherty said. “Being able to separate particles in this size range means that we can target a lot of things that cause disease,” said Stacy Gifford, an IBM Research biochemist, in the IBM video. “So exosomes are one thing. They’re a good marker for a lot of different cancers and then there are other things like viruses and proteins and protein complexes that also play a really important role in not just disease, but healthy states as well." This is where the nano-DLD technology comes in. Using nano-DLD, a liquid sample passes in a continuous flow through a silicon chip designed with an asymmetric pillar array. This array allows the system to sort the microscopic particles, separating them by size down to tens of nanometers resolution, Doherty said. “The ability to sort and enrich biomarkers at the nanoscale in chip-based technologies opens the door to understanding diseases such as cancer as well as viruses like the flu or Zika,” Stolovitzky said in a statement. “Our lab-on-a-chip device could offer a simple, noninvasive and affordable option to potentially detect and monitor a disease even at its earliest stages, long before physical symptoms manifest. This extra amount of time allows physicians to make more informed decisions and when the prognosis for treatment options is most positive.” Dr. Carlos Cordon-Cardo, professor and chairman for the Mount Sinai Health System Department of Pathology, is optimistic about the new technology and the liquid biopsy because it enables physicians to look at illnesses in new ways and treat patients earlier in their battle with diseases like cancer. “If we can identify not only one molecule or one protein or one DNA, but if we can start looking at the disease at the multidimensional level, we can get inside of the disease and look at it from inside out,” he said.


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NIH Precision Medicine Effort to Explore New tools for integrating patient data with information about contextual factors that influence health outcomes

NIH Precision Medicine Effort to Explore New tools for integrating patient data with information about contextual factors that influence health outcomes | IT Service Management | Scoop.it

The National Institutes of Health is ponying up $31 million over five years to launch a new research program to explore the potential for precision medicine to help reduce health disparities. NIH’s effort includes the development of new tools and analytic methods for integrating patient data with information about contextual factors at the community and population levels that influence health outcomes, such as economic, social and political conditions. Regina James, director of clinical and health services research at the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), says new tools and analytics, and data integration are one of five priority areas that so-called Transdisciplinary Collaborative Centers (TCCs) will focus on as part of their work. “We’re hoping that the TCCs will bring to bear their knowledge and expertise to begin to integrate the social contextual factors that go beyond biologic and clinical markers to really make it relevant for populations that are underserved,” says James. At the same time, she adds that another priority research area for NIMHD’s precision medicine initiative is the development of pharmacogenomic tools to identify critical biomarkers for disease progression and drug responses in diverse populations. TCC cooperative agreement awards, each providing as much as $1.5 million in direct costs annually over five years (plus applicable indirect costs), have been made to three academic institutions: Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., and Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. The TCCs will focus on at least one priority research area to address one or more documented health disparities for populations, which include Blacks/African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Each academic center will support two to three multidisciplinary research projects examining complementary aspects of precision medicine, focusing on interactions between biological, behavioral and contextual predictors of disease vulnerability, resilience and response to therapies in patients from disadvantaged communities. Unfortunately, racial-ethnic minorities as well as socio-economically disadvantaged and rural populations in the U.S. continue to experience a disproportionate share of many diseases and adverse health conditions. However, precision medicine holds great promise for reducing these health disparities through better targeted prevention and treatment strategies, according to James. “We want to make sure that precision medicine can actually benefit all Americans,” she says. “For those Americans who might be disproportionately affected by health issues or have poor health outcomes, we want to ensure that the science is also addressing those populations.” While James contends that NIMHD’s precision medicine program shares the vision of President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative, she emphasizes that its effort is not connected to the PMI longitudinal research cohort of 1 million or more U.S. volunteers that NIH is currently rolling out. “These are two separate initiatives,” says James. “The money that Congress allocated for the PMI cohort is different. This is funding from the Institute itself to specifically focus on precision medicine research on health disparities.”


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How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care

How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
The revolution is finally here—raising a host of questions for regulators, providers, insurers and patients.
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Do You Really Need to Hold That Meeting?

Do You Really Need to Hold That Meeting? | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
A simple tool to help you decide.
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You’re Not Investing Enough in IT Security, Healthcare

You’re Not Investing Enough in IT Security, Healthcare | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
The fact is, most of healthcare simply doesn’t spend enough on data security.
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Flint doctor used Epic Systems records to expose lead crisis

Flint doctor used Epic Systems records to expose lead crisis | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, of Hurley Medical Center in Flint, analyzed confidential data from blood tests on children stored in software designed by Verona-based Epic Systems Corp.
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Radiologist Can Read Images and Medical Records

Radiologist Can Read Images and Medical Records | IT Service Management | Scoop.it
Software that can read medical images and written health records could help radiologists work faster and more accurately.
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Rescooped by Muhammad Siddiqui, MBA from Splunk - IT Operations and Business Intelligence
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Healthcare is about to go virtual

Healthcare is about to go virtual | IT Service Management | Scoop.it

From simulating surgery and training doctors by interacting with virtual patients, to treating phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder through exposure to virtual environments, many experts are singing the technology’s praises, calling it game-changing in the healthcare space.


Via Lori Eddlemon
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Lori Eddlemon's curator insight, February 25, 2015 11:14 PM

The idea of Virtual Reality to predict the effects of a new drug will be welcomed by all generations.