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Wildlife News Roundup (September 7-13, 2013)

Wildlife News Roundup (September 7-13, 2013) | Wildlife | Scoop.it
The critically endangered black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) is one of many species threatened by illegal wildlife trafficking. The U.S.
Haley van Zante's insight:

The U.S is starting a campaign to stop wildlife trafficking of speicies threatend by illegal hunting in many regions of the world. I found it interesting that people are taking a stand for this situation. Also helping animals that can't fight for themselves. If this doesn't stop then some anmials will become extinct.

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Wildlife News Roundup (September 21-27, 2013)

Wildlife News Roundup (September 21-27, 2013) | Wildlife | Scoop.it
Ivory tusks and other products of the wildlife poaching trade have been used to fund terrorist activities.
Haley van Zante's insight:

Ivory tusks and other produces of wildlife have been used to fund terrorist activites through kenya. Wildlife activists said, "Over the last 18 months, we've been investigating the involvement of the Shebaba in trafficking ivory through Kenya." I am amazed that this situation is actually getting some help, and from people that actually know what they are doing.

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Sea Turtles Making a Comeback at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge | Defenders of Wildlife Blog

Sea Turtles Making a Comeback at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge | Defenders of Wildlife Blog | Wildlife | Scoop.it
Our Florida team accompanies wildlife biologists on a survey of nesting sea turtles at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, where some of these endangered animals are having a record-breaking year! ...

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
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Paige Anderson's curator insight, October 2, 2013 4:33 PM

WOW!   I have always  thought sea turtles were dieing out,  but I guess not.  That so great that sea turtles are having recored breaking numbers.  I realy do hope that they will stay that way.  Also its so great to see people caring about sea life.  

Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 8:04 PM
Seeing the turtles making a comeback brings a positive vibe for the entire ecosystem. Losing the sea turtles all together could have cause a drastic change in the oceans ecosystem that some other species couldn't handle.
Luis Obil's comment, October 4, 2013 10:50 AM
It's amazing to hear that people are helping animals, going into the sea just for help them. You are doing a great job guys
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Why Secret Wildlife Cameras Might Be a Poacher’s Worst Nightmare

Why Secret Wildlife Cameras Might Be a Poacher’s Worst Nightmare | Wildlife | Scoop.it

It seemed at first like a familiar story. In 2011 at Orang National Park in Assam, India, poachers killed one of the park’s 70 rhinos, hacked off its precious horn, and made their escape. But a few days later, park rangers were flipping through the latest batch of images from a nearby camera trap set to monitor wildlife.

 

To their surprise, the camera had caught a perfect image of three poachers entering the park before the killing, armed with .303 rifles. After “wanted” posters appeared in nearby villages, two of the poachers soon surrendered and the third fled the area. There was only one problem: The rhino was already dead.

 

Could camera traps actually stop poachers before they kill? Since they first became widely available a decade or so ago, camera traps have revolutionized conservation biology. Human researchers tended to work by day, says Tim O’Brien, a camera trap specialist in Kenya for the Wildlife Conservation Society. But “half the species out there are nocturnal, and the other half are doing everything they can to avoid humans.” By being on the scene around the clock and without human disturbance, other than occasional visits to change batteries and download photos, camera traps have recently solved both problems, often with spectacular results:..


Via Wildlife Margrit
Haley van Zante's insight:

Some people wonder why we can't just use your cell phones instead of cameras. The problem with that is that curtain places do not have signal for cell phones, and so it is not possible. Cameras also have better lenses and cell phone cameras sometimes don't show things clear enough when it's far away. 

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Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 8:06 PM
Having hidden trail or game cameras that are motion activated can track a lot of activity. They are used often to count herd numbers, as well as investigate into poaching. If poachers are seen when the game cameras are reviewed, it isn't to difficult to then track them down and stop them from killing another animal before it happens again.
Wildlife Margrit's comment, October 7, 2013 11:00 AM
Thanks for that Brent
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Intense Drought a Big Problem for Lower Klamath NWR

Intense Drought a Big Problem for Lower Klamath NWR | Wildlife | Scoop.it
Swans in the wetlands at Lower Klamath NWR in January 2010. This year, fewer waterfowl will winter in the refuge because of extreme drought.
Haley van Zante's insight:

In Northeastern California and Southern Oregon have been facing a big drought problem and wetland loss. The refuge is a home to 25 speices listed by California and Oregon as threatend or sensitive. The animals are starting to understand what is going on and now are disappearing. I think that it's amazing that California and Oregon are helping with this situation, and care for the animals that are suffering through this drought.

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Kolbie VanDusseldorp's comment, October 3, 2013 11:16 PM
I think this is important, many things are being affected by these droughts and could cause stuff like this to dry up and become of nothing.
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State wildlife official: 13-foot gator pulled from lake should not have been ... - Tampabay.com

State wildlife official: 13-foot gator pulled from lake should not have been ... - Tampabay.com | Wildlife | Scoop.it
Tampabay.com
State wildlife official: 13-foot gator pulled from lake should not have been ...
Tampabay.com
ST.
Haley van Zante's insight:

A man by the name of Johannessn recieved his permit and recived a 41 page "Training and Orientation" manual that clearly starts that trapping an aligator is porhibited. Johannessn was told that he could hunt there, and he had killed the aligator, and a local biologist, George Heinrich has been observing that gator for 25 years. Here is what he had to say, "That alligator got that big by avoiding people. It was not a nuisance." I believe that the alligator should of been left alone because there was no harm to anyone, and it's amazing that something that seems so harmful turned out to be something good.

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South African businessman behind elephant poisonings

South African businessman behind elephant poisonings | Wildlife | Scoop.it

Zimbabwean police are bringing their investigations into the deaths of at least 64 elephants by cyanide poisoning in the Hwange National Park to an end....

 

Police revealed that the poachers would mix up a combination of cyanide, salt and water. This would then be poured onto salt licks at watering holes known to be frequented by elephants. At other watering holes the poachers would dig holes and place containers containing the deadly mixture into the holes.

 

The technique was so effective at killing elephants that when the poachers took police to the sites that had been contaminated there were bodies of elephants with small tusks still intact because it wasn’t worth the effort to take the tusks, The poachers were being paid as little as $700 for 9 tusks....


Via Wildlife Margrit
Haley van Zante's insight:

Zimbabwean police have been investigating into the deaths of at least 64 elephants. The elephants were posioned by cyanide. The person behind all of this is a South African businessman, and has been doing this since 2009. My question is, how could someone live everyday knowing that they have killed an innocent animal? 

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Wildlife Margrit's curator insight, September 20, 2013 4:50 PM

Let's hope they really make an example of these guys!

The recent poisoning in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe is being called "an ecological disaster" as not only 64 elephants died, but lions, buffalo, jackal and who knows what other animals and birds drinking the poisoned water.

 

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Wildlife researchers track threatened shorebird

Wildlife researchers track threatened shorebird | Wildlife | Scoop.it
Biologists hope to learn more about the marathon migration routes of elusive red knots

Via Bourdoncle, Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Aanna Roslien's comment, September 27, 2013 10:29 AM
This story is really cool. I think that it's important to make sure that the shorebird's are being protected. I also think that it's smart to calculate their location to see where they are going.
AJ Kingery's comment, October 1, 2013 10:34 AM
It's a good idea to find more information about this bird and know where they live and know where they are going. Now we can protect the bird and keep it healthy.
Kolbie VanDusseldorp's comment, October 3, 2013 11:15 PM
I think this is a great article. Everything has a spot in the food chain and without one or two things the whole chain can be screwed up.
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Wildlife News Roundup (September 7-13, 2013)

Wildlife News Roundup (September 7-13, 2013) | Wildlife | Scoop.it
The critically endangered black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) is one of many species threatened by illegal wildlife trafficking. The U.S.
Haley van Zante's insight:

The U.S is starting a campaign to stop wildlife trafficking of speicies threatend by illegal hunting in many regions of the world. I found it interesting that people are taking a stand for this situation. Also helping animals that can't fight for themselves. If this doesn't stop then some anmials will become extinct.

more...
No comment yet.