WIFI
1.0K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jacques Ruckert
Scoop.it!

Watch Steve Jobs Introduce WiFi to the Masses [Video] - iClarified

Watch Steve Jobs Introduce WiFi to the Masses [Video] - iClarified | WIFI | Scoop.it
Watch Steve Jobs Introduce WiFi to the Masses [Video] iClarified Reddit brings to our attention an old video that some of you may not have seen -- Steve Jobs introducing Wi-Fi for the first time to the masses, becoming the first mainstream computer...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacques Ruckert
Scoop.it!

This Is What Wi-Fi Would Look Like, If We Could See It | Co.Exist ...

This Is What Wi-Fi Would Look Like, If We Could See It | Co.Exist ... | WIFI | Scoop.it
Even though Wi-Fi is invisible, we know when it's not working. Some people have even developed a bat-like sense of guessing where the signal is strongest and moving their laptops to that specific coffee shop table.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacques Ruckert from Raspberry Pi
Scoop.it!

WiFi board combines Arduino with Linux for easy M2M use

WiFi board combines Arduino with Linux for easy M2M use | WIFI | Scoop.it
WiFi board combines Arduino with Linux for easy M2M use
EDN.com
Arduino Yún is the first member of a new line of wifi products combining the power Linux with ease of use of Arduino.

Via F. Thunus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacques Ruckert from Mobile Video, OTT and payTV
Scoop.it!

Google to bankroll, build wireless networks across Africa: WSJ

Google to bankroll, build wireless networks across Africa: WSJ | WIFI | Scoop.it

 Google Inc intends to finance, build and help operate wireless networks from sub-Saharan Africa to Southeast Asia, hoping to connect a billion or so people in emerging countries to the Internet, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday.

The Internet search giant - which has for years espoused universal Web access - is employing a patchwork quilt of technologies and holding discussions with regulators from South Africa to Kenya, the WSJ cited people familiar with the strategy as saying.

Access to the vast trove of information on the Internet, and the tools to make use of it, is considered key to lifting economies up the value chain. But countries are often hampered by the vast sums needed to build infrastructure, thorny regulations or geographical terrain.

To reach its goal, Google, which benefits the more people have access to its search and other Internet services, is lobbying regulators to use airwaves reserved for television broadcasts, which at lower frequencies can pass through buildings and over longer distances, the WSJ reported.

It is also working on providing low-cost cellphones and employing balloons or blimps to transmit signals over hundreds of square miles from high altitudes.

The company has already begun several small-scale trials, including in Cape Town, South Africa, where it is using a base station in conjunction with wireless access boxes to broadcast signals over several miles, the newspaper reported.

Chief Executive Larry Page has made no secret of his plans to use his company to work toward broader, non-profit goals. Google on Friday declined to comment on its plans.


Via Patrick Lopez
more...
Patrick Lopez's curator insight, May 31, 2013 9:09 AM

Now its getting interesting... after subsidizing internet infrastructure for YouTube traffic, implementing large scale wifi and fibre networks, Google is to build and operate wireless networks.

 

This has a huge potential, connecting th enext billion subs with (free?) wireless access, inexchange for their use of Google products (you'll need a Google account, maybe exclusively an android phone?, maybe you'll use only Google chat, circles, talk...).

 

 

Rescooped by Jacques Ruckert from Innovative Marketing and Crowdfunding
Scoop.it!

Google blimps will carry wireless signal across Africa (Wired UK)

Google blimps will carry wireless signal across Africa (Wired UK) | WIFI | Scoop.it
Search giant Google is intending to build huge wireless networks across Africa and Asia, using high-altitude balloons and blimps

Via Marty Koenig
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacques Ruckert from 4G LTE Mobile Broadband
Scoop.it!

Vodafone R206 Unlocked | HUAWEI R206 Mobile WiFi | Buy Vodafone R206 Huawei MiFi Hotspot

Vodafone R206 Unlocked | HUAWEI R206 Mobile WiFi | Buy Vodafone R206 Huawei MiFi Hotspot | WIFI | Scoop.it
Check Vodafone R206 Huawei MiFi Hotspot images, appearance, specifications, chipset, data rate speed, price and applications, review Unlocked HUAWEI R206 Mobile WiFi Hotspot functions and buy Vodafone R206 Huawei Mobile WiFi Hotspot...

Via Allen Jeffson
more...
Allen Jeffson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:47 AM

Vodafone R206 3G Mobile WiFi Hotspot is a new pocket MiFi from HUAWEI. The HUAWEI R206 is upgraded from HUAWEI R205 MiFi and supports maximum download speed up to 21Mbps. The Vodafone R206 MiFi looks like HUAWEI E5220 Mobile Hotspot, but it's with Vodafone logo.

Scooped by Jacques Ruckert
Scoop.it!

Arena wireless provider hopes to make it all clear - Lincoln Journal Star

Arena wireless provider hopes to make it all clear - Lincoln Journal Star | WIFI | Scoop.it
Arena wireless provider hopes to make it all clear Lincoln Journal Star After complaints from customers at Memorial Stadium, for example, Verizon Wireless installed portable cellular antennae two years ago, just to handle the traffic there, then...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jacques Ruckert from Mobile Video, OTT and payTV
Scoop.it!

Cisco CEO: Cellular data transport 'will become free'

Cisco CEO: Cellular data transport 'will become free' | WIFI | Scoop.it

Cisco Systems CEO John Chambers predicted that the cost of transporting mobile data will follow a path similar to mobile voice: As networks become more efficient, the cost of transmitting mobile data will fall.

"Price points are going to come down rapidly," Chambers said during an interview at AllThingsD's D11 conference, according to AllThingsD. "Transport will become free. … Architectures will change. With intelligence throughout the network, the network will become the platform of the future."

Chambers was responding to a question about whether cellular data networks will be able to handle the rising data demands of an increasingly mobile and smartphone-toting population. Chambers said improvements in the designs of wireless networks will allow operators to slowly bring down the cost of mobile data services, as they have been able to do with voice calling.

Not surprisingly, Cisco is working to sell a range of products to mobile operators that the vendor believes will help reduce the cost of launching and maintaining a network. The actions stem partly from Cisco's acquisition of the likes of Intucell, BroadHop, ThinkSmart and Meraki. Cisco is working to cobble those companies together with its own products in a bid to challenge mobile equipment market leaders like Ericsson (NASDAQ:ERIC) and Alcatel-Lucent (NYSE:ALU).

For example, during his D11 appearance, Chambers discussed Cisco's "service provider Wi-Fi" products that he said use unlicensed spectrum to offload data. Wi-Fi, Chambers predicted, will eventually carry 80 to 90 percent of the growth of cellular networks.

Chambers' comments come on the heels of Cisco's release of its new Visual Networking Index (VNI) Forecast for 2012 to 2017. Cisco's VNI is the vendor's widely cited traffic monitoring report, and in the company's newest forecast Cisco predicts global Internet protocol (IP) traffic will grow three-fold between 2012 and 2017, to an annual run rate of 1.4 zettabytes--more than a trillion gigabytes per year--by 2017.

In its new VNI forecast, Cisco said that in 2012 around 26 percent of Internet traffic originated with non-PC devices, but by 2017 the non-PC share of Internet traffic will grow to 49 percent. During that period, smartphone traffic will grow by 79 percent, and tablet traffic will grow by 104 percent.

Finally, Cisco said that, globally, there were 3.8 billion mobile consumers in 2012, a number that will grow by 4.1 percent to 4.6 billion by 2017.




Via Patrick Lopez
more...
Patrick Lopez's curator insight, May 30, 2013 11:50 AM

So Cisco will give away its technology to enable that drastic new cost structure?

Rescooped by Jacques Ruckert from Mobile Video, OTT and payTV
Scoop.it!

{Core Analysis}: Yay! free mobile broadband for all: Cisco and Google

{Core Analysis}: Yay! free mobile broadband for all: Cisco and Google | WIFI | Scoop.it

Cisco 

Cisco VNI 2013 mobile video growth




As Cisco released the latest iteration of its Visual Networking Index, its CEO, John Chambers predicted at "All things D" D11conference that improvements in mobile networks architecture and topology will progressively reduce costs and that mobile data will become free...
Not less expensive, inexpensive or cheap... free.
Wow, I am not sure how that happens. With the industry spending $300+ billions per year to increase networks capacity, and signs that LTE might need an LTE Advanced injection sooner than anticipated, the comment seems curious.
Cisco wants, like most of the enterprise vendors in the market to make wireless networks more IT than Telco. That means less differentiated boxes, more i/o, more centralized control, no proprietary interfaces, hardware, protocols. 
This is a good aim, but the reason why the Telco market has been historically highly proprietary has as much to do with its idiosyncrasies and politics (GSM, TDMA, CDMA, WIMAX, WCDMA, LTE FDD and TDD...IMS) than vendors. "Standards" have emerged by necessity but have always been the smallest common denominator for networks and functions to behave, leaving wide margin for vendor differentiation and proprietary "enhancements". That needs to be resolved first before you can see costs come down. At last, costs coming down do not necessarily equate prices going down... unless content starts to subsidize bandwidth like YouTube / Netflix with internet backbone. Talking about Google/YouTube....

Google

This week as well, Google made the headlines, speaking to the Wall Street Journal. The company was quoted having plans to deploy and operate wireless networks in Sub Saharan Africa and South East Asia. Orange CEO was boasting having made Google pay for traffic in Africa in February, that was a short victory.
After subsidizing internet infrastructure for YouTube traffic, implementing large scale wifi and fiber networks, Google is to build and operate wireless networks.The idea is that Google would build these networks to provide wireless broadband services that are proving to be great enhancements in people's quality of life, communication and prosperity, such as watching cats fall off TV sets on YouTube or playing massive multiplayer online games on Facebook.
More seriously, the implications of this move are tremendous. Google could have a completely integrated vertical content delivery form creation, to aggregation, to delivery and display. What will Google want in exchange for these investments? Maybe nothing, the CEO was quoted several times having Google working on wide ranging non-profit goals....
But then again, indirectly, maybe you will need an Android device to access these networks, or maybe Google talk, chat... will be free on these networks, but you will have top pay to use other apps or services...
Certainly, connecting the next billion subscribers to wireless broadband for free is an inspiring goal. The skeptics and cynics will see here another way to dominate a market by vertical integration.

Jury is out, but if you are a wireless network operator in these regions, you better start thinking about what that could mean to your business.


Via Patrick Lopez
more...
No comment yet.