WHS - Technology VS Human Error
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Freight Train Hits Bogged Car | OHS News

Freight Train Hits Bogged Car | OHS News | WHS - Technology VS Human Error | Scoop.it
Reported by Robel | 09:02am, Tuesday 15 July, 2014 

A freight train has reportedly smashed a car bogged on the train tracks at Herne Hill.

Police authorities are now trying to determine who the driver of the wrecked car was. The incident extensively damaged the car.

According to reports, the freight train was not able to stop and hits the car which suffered massive damage. The train, booms gates and the warning light were also damaged during the incident.

  
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New waste disposal technology to improve workplace safety and sanitation | OHS News

New waste disposal technology to improve workplace safety and sanitation | OHS News | WHS - Technology VS Human Error | Scoop.it

Reported by Michael | 12:30pm, Monday 12 May, 2014

 

A new modular steel ducting waste disposal machinery made by Eximo is projected to significantly improve the process of waste disposal in manufacturing facilities.

Designed to be cost-effective and easy to set up, the Eximo SpeedLOCK modular steel ducting makes waste disposal ducting as easy as unclipping a lever and reassembling.

SpeedLOCK is also manufactured using smooth bore technology, a technology that minimises the risk of waste settlement and clogging.

SpeedLOCK’s application ranges from wood and metal shavings, to agricultural and milling waste, food waste from confectionary production, paper waste, liquid waste, welding flux removal and even sand removal for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) operating in Middle East war zones.

Eximo delivers ducted disposal systems designed to meet any specific requirement in manufacturing environments; from faster, more efficient particle and fume removal, to simultaneous waste removal without interrupting packaged goods production lines.

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Using Technology in Mines Improves Worker Safety | OHS News

Using Technology in Mines Improves Worker Safety | OHS News | WHS - Technology VS Human Error | Scoop.it

Reported by Zoe | 11:40am, Tuesday 11 December, 2012

 

An array of new technology is being increasingly used such as glasses that predict micro-sleeps, remotely operated underground vehicles, autonomous trucks, sensor networks, mobile apps and touch screen information kiosks to improve safety for workers in the Australian resources industry.

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Andrew Cross's curator insight, March 27, 2015 7:30 AM

As the cyberspace and technological world grows so will the tools and machines that aid in workers abilities to complete tasks as work. Seeing a large mining company embracing the technological world I feel is a positive step in the right direction as long as the technology continues to aid in reducing workplace incidents.

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New Roof Bolt Equipment Design to Solve Safety Problem in Mining Industry | OHS News

New Roof Bolt Equipment Design to Solve Safety Problem in Mining Industry | OHS News | WHS - Technology VS Human Error | Scoop.it

Reported by Michael | 01:36pm, Wednesday 26 March, 2014

 

  

Leussink Engineering, an Illawarra-based manufacturer, has designed an ironically small equipment to improve safety in the heavy equipment-laden underground mining industry.

The equipment is aimed at eliminating or reducing the risk of injuries related to accidental roof bolt release. Incidents of falling roof mounts that fix hydraulic systems are often caused by overlooking safety measures involving a tiny component used in the undertaking, this is according to Mr Jason Leussink, Director of Leussink.

The component, a lever, is responsible for activating hydraulic power used in fixing roof bolts.

Leussink reckoned that the traditional position of this lever made it prone to causing accidents. The lever is traditionally mounted on the hydraulic manifold;  since underground mining operates under low ceilings, this makes the lever positioned at the leg level.

This setup makes the lever prone to accidental bumps that could trigger an activation of the hydraulic valve and eventually lead to a roof bolt release.  A falling roof bolt that lands on a worker could cause severe injury.

Leussink’s new design includes a spring-loaded safety lever that requires two different movements in order to function – one upward movement followed by a lateral one. This two-way initiation process prevents the lever from immediately triggering the hydraulic valve when accidentally bumped.

Leussink’s new version also automatically returns to a safe “locked” position once the operator releases the lever.

T-Bone's insight:

I would like to see a demonstration.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ciusMglNMY

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Google Glass is here. Can it save Workers' Lives? | OHS News

Google Glass is here. Can it save Workers' Lives? | OHS News | WHS - Technology VS Human Error | Scoop.it

Reported by Admin | 10:00am, Thursday 23 May, 2013

 

Google’s development of a wearable, hands-free, computer/camera/communication device is a major technological advance. As innovators in the field of cutting-edge Safety Management Systems, we at SafetyCulture are asking the question… Can Google Glass Save Workers’ Lives? At the very least, can it help us manage worker safety more efficiently?

We think the answer is yes.

We have what we believe is the first Google Glass device to hit Australian shores, as part of a developer release. Our determination to get our hands on them was driven by our clear vision of improvements we intend to deliver for worker safety.

The major advantage of Glass, is it’s ability allow the wearer to access and receive information, while operating ‘hands-free’. Not only that, the user can capture photos and video and send these to others in real time.

T-Bone's insight:

This will certainly be worth following!

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