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Working Towards Putting an End to Bullying

Working Towards Putting an End to Bullying | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Bullying among children and teens has been a prominent issue in schools and neighborhoods for decades but not fully understood or... (Declining grades in school could be a sign that your child is being bullied.
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Whole Child Development
Emerging research on healthy physical, cognitive, social and emotional development.
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The Boys at the Back

The Boys at the Back | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

"Boys score as well as or better than girls on most standardized tests, yet they are far less likely to get good grades, take advanced classes or attend college. Why? A study coming out this week in The Journal of Human Resources gives an important answer. Teachers of classes as early as kindergarten factor good behavior into grades — and girls, as a rule, comport themselves far better than boys. The scholars attributed this 'misalignment' to differences in “noncognitive skills”: attentiveness, persistence, eagerness to learn, the ability to sit still and work independently. As most parents know, girls tend to develop these skills earlier and more naturally than boys. No previous study, to my knowledge, has demonstrated that the well-known gender gap in school grades begins so early and is almost entirely attributable to differences in behavior. The researchers found that teachers rated boys as less proficient even when the boys did just as well as the girls on tests of reading, math and science. (The teachers did not know the test scores in advance.) If the teachers had not accounted for classroom behavior, the boys’ grades, like the girls’, would have matched their test scores." | by Christina Hoff Sommers

 


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10 Ways for Kids to Find Their Own Score Card to Maximize Learning at School

10 Ways for Kids to Find Their Own Score Card to Maximize Learning at School | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
How do you help your children and teens think for themselves, stay true to their nature, and go at their own pace?

Schools have rules, grades, tests, competitions, and hopefully, learning.
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The Power of Parenting for Social and Emotional Learning

The Power of Parenting for Social and Emotional Learning - Changemaker Education - Medium

Social and emotional learning (SEL) involves acquiring and effectively applying the knowledge, attitudes and skills to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions....

While teaching skills like empathy, active listening and collaborative problem solving, schools are simultaneously preventing unhealthy, high risk behaviors including school violence...


Here are some ideas:

  1. Begin at home. 
  2. Partner with your child’s teacher
  3. Partner with your school.
  4. Advocate.


by Jennifer Miller 


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The Three C's: How Project Based Learning Improves Collaboration, Creativity and Critical Thinking (EdSurge News)

The Three C's: How Project Based Learning Improves Collaboration, Creativity and Critical Thinking (EdSurge News) | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
On August 4th, 2015, in Davis, California, superintendents and high level district teams from around California assembled for a day of exploring edtech solutions, networking with colleagues and learning from other educational leaders.

Via Cindy Rudy, Lynnette Van Dyke
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The job of an abortion doula

The job of an abortion doula | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
The word "doula" is evocative of the birthing process. And, over the last decade, it has also been extended to include the end-of-life process.
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Five Things Successful Turnaround Schools Have in Common

In spite of its success, the federal School Improvement Grants program could be dismantled, writes researcher Greg Anrig.

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Steve Silberman on autism and 'neurodiversity' - Macleans.ca

Steve Silberman on autism and 'neurodiversity' - Macleans.ca | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
A Q&A with an author about neurodiversity: the radically humane idea that people process the world in different ways, and there's nothing wrong with that

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Screentime Is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy

Screentime Is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
The child or teen who is “revved up” and prone to rages or—alternatively—who is depressed and apathetic has become disturbingly commonplace.  Chronically irritable children are often in a state of abnormally high arousal, and may seem “wired and tired.”  That is, they’re agitated but exhausted.  Because chronically high arousal levels impact memory and the ability to relate, these kids are also likely to be struggling academically and socially.
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U.S. Kids Suffer High Rates of Assault, Abuse, Study Finds

U.S. Kids Suffer High Rates of Assault, Abuse, Study Finds | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
More than one-third of U.S. children and teens have been physically assaulted -- mostly by siblings and peers -- in the past year, a new study finds.

And one in 20 kids has been physically abused by a parent or another caregiver in the same time period, the researchers said.

"Children are the most victimized segment of the population," said study author David Finkelhor, director of the Crimes against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire. "The full burden of this tends to be missed because many national crime indicators either do not include the experience of all children or don't look at the big picture and include all the kinds of violence to which children are exposed."

The implications of these results are substantial in terms of children's lives long-term, Finkelhor said.

"Violence and abuse in childhood are big drivers behind many of our most serious health and social problems," Finkelhor said. "They are associated with later drug abuse, suicide, criminal behavior, mental illness and chronic diseases like diabetes."

The findings were published online June 29 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

The researchers analyzed the results of telephone interviews about the experiences of 4,000 children and teens. Children aged 10 to 17 answered questions about their exposure to violence, crime and abuse, while the caregivers answered questions for children aged 9 and younger.

Just over 37 percent of the children in the study had been physically assaulted in the past year, usually by siblings or peers, and 9 percent had been injured from an assault.

But 15 percent had been mistreated by a parent or other caregiver, including 5 percent who were physically abused by a parent or other caregiver. This mistreatment included physical abuse, emotional abuse, neglect or interfering with a child's custody arrangements, such as refusing to let a child see another parent or talk to them on the phone. Another 6 percent saw a physical fight between their parents.
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Brief Drop in Blood Sugar at Birth Tied to Poorer School Performance

Brief Drop in Blood Sugar at Birth Tied to Poorer School Performance | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
But researchers say it's too soon to recommend routine screening
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CBC.ca | Information Morning Cape Breton | The Faces of Addiction

CBC.ca | Information Morning Cape Breton | The Faces of Addiction | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

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6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups - TeachThought

6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups - TeachThought | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Grouping students is easy; creating effective student groups is less so.

The following infographic from Mia MacMeekin seeks to provide some ideas to help make group work easier in your classroom. The strength of this particular graphic is in the range of the ideas. The first tip refers teachers to Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal development, which frames student ability in terms of a range: what they can do unassisted, what they can do with the support of a More Knowledgeable Other (MKO), and what they cannot do even with support. This is different for each student, and understanding these ranges for students can help inform grouping decisions, whether you’re using a peer instruction model, ability grouping, or another approach.

Via John Evans, Chris Carter, Suvi Salo, Ivo Nový
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harloff's curator insight, August 27, 3:48 AM

Nice infographics av very informative.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, August 27, 7:14 AM

Facilitando el trabajo en el aula...6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups - TeachThought | @scoopit via @joevans http://sco.lt/...

Miep Carstensen's curator insight, August 28, 5:40 PM

This is a great info graphic, but I would also add the importance of praising effort.

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New book urges parents to let kids fail - Life & Style - NZ Herald News

New book urges parents to let kids fail - Life & Style - NZ Herald News | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

“A new book written by a schoolteacher has a simple yet compelling message for parents: back off. - New Zealand Herald”


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Anderson and Krathwohl - Bloom's Taxonomy Revised - The Second Principle

Anderson and Krathwohl - Bloom's Taxonomy Revised - The Second Principle | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

AAnderson and Krathwohl -Bloom's taxonomy revised - A focused discussion of the changes and revisions to the classic cognitive taxonomy w/ charts & examples.


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John R. Walkup's curator insight, December 14, 2014 5:57 PM

A well-crafted discussion of the two versions of Bloom's Taxonomy.

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Renowned researcher: ‘Why I am no longer comfortable’ in the field of educational measurement

Renowned researcher: ‘Why I am no longer comfortable’ in the field of educational measurement | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
'When measurement became the instrument of accountability, testing companies prospered and schools suffered. I have watched this happen for several years now. I have slowly withdrawn my intellectual commitment to the field of measurement. Recently I asked my dean to switch my affiliation from the measurement program to the policy program.'
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Differences in brain structure and memory suggest adolescents may not ‘grow out of’ ADHD

Differences in brain structure and memory suggest adolescents may not ‘grow out of’ ADHD | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Young adults diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adolescence show differences in brain structure and perform poorly in memory tests compared to their peers, according to new research from the University of Cambridge,...
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Study: There Are Instructions for Teaching Critical Thinking

Study: There Are Instructions for Teaching Critical Thinking | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
A new study says critical thinking is a teachable skill, but who is going to teach it?
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Via Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Education Department Alters Testing Requirement for Students with Disabilities - Education Week (subscription) (blog)

The U.S. Department of Education has taken a politically symbolic step: It's officially said that states can offer alternate assessments only to the 1 percent of students who have severe cognitive disabilities.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Looking for Autism - Harvard Health (blog)

Looking for Autism - Harvard Health (blog) | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
One in 68 children has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. That’s really common. Autism isn’t exactly something parents want to find in their child—so it’s understandable that parents might feel uneasy about looking for it.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Dumb & Dumber: Interactive Screentime is Worse than TV

Dumb & Dumber: Interactive Screentime is Worse than TV | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Over the years, I’ve come to appreciate the fact that virtually all young people benefit from a clean, solid, several-week long break (link is external) from interactive screen-time.  By removing all unnecessary electronic devices, children, teens and young adults exhibit a more relaxed and even mood, better focus, deeper sleep and improved functioning in the realms of school or work, home life, and social relationships.[*] In fact, much of the time, progress is limited until this factor is addressed, especially now that tech overuse is so ubiquitous.

When I first began using the electronic fast as a way to both clarify diagnoses and reset the brain (link is external), it was around the turn of the millennium, and I was focused primarily on abstention from gaming.  Along the way I’ve found it necessary to add a growing number of devices (laptops, smartphones, ipads/tablets) and activities (texting, internet surfing, social media use) to the forbidden list in order to reverse stress-induced changes in brain chemistry, circadian rhythms, sleep, and blood flow. If even a small amount of interactive screen-time remained (outside of school), the intervention didn’t work. On the other hand, I’d allow moderate amounts of television or movies—so-called passive screen-time—provided the content was slow-paced and non-animated (with the exception of older Disney animated movies), and that it was viewed on a television from across the room (and not the bedroom!).  Meanwhile, many parents were concerned about and limited TV time, but were under the impression that interactive screen-time was “better for the brain”—and thus did little to manage it.
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Autism diagnosis rising in Australia, but not clear if condition more prevalent

Autism diagnosis rising in Australia, but not clear if condition more prevalent | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute says more children are being confirmed with the condition, but are unsure whether trend is due to earlier diagnoses More Australian children are being diagnosed with autism, but researchers don’t know if it’s...
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Lands' End Teams Up with the Child Mind Institute for Back-to-School

Lands' End Teams Up with the Child Mind Institute for Back-to-School | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
To kick off the Back-to-School season, Lands' End is partnering with the Child Mind Institute to bring moms and dads the latest information on parenting and child development, enabling them to get back into the new school year with ease. This organization shares Lands' End's passion for raising strong, compassionate, curious kids and supporting their families.

"As a brand that has always been committed to families, we are proud to be partnering with the Child Mind Institute to help provide help and hope to children and their families," says Federica Marchionni, CEO of Lands' End.  "We're confident that through this partnership, we can bring valuable information and advice to the millions of parents we touch each year."

"We are very excited with the support from Lands' End," says Dr. Harold Koplewicz, president of the Child Mind Institute. "This partnership will help us reach many more children and families with accurate information about children's wellbeing and healthy brain development — especially as children head back to school."

The Child Mind Institute delivers the highest standards of care, pushes the science of the developing brain and serves as the leading children's mental health resource for parents, professionals and policymakers. Lands' End is working in tandem with them to create content that will get both parents and their children back into the classroom mindset. Topics include: 

A Parent's Guide to Getting Ready for Back-to-School
Dos and Don'ts for Back-to-School
Five Tips To Help Kids Get a Good Start in the New School Year
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Is This Family Gender-Biased?

Is This Family Gender-Biased? | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Gender roles can be so ingrained that we don’t even realize we’re reinforcing them with our own parenting choices.

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Teaching empathy can help our children to find success in life

Teaching empathy can help our children to find success in life | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

The UNESCO child and family research centre at NUI Galway recommends that we teach children empathy in schools


Greed is dead. Empathy is in. The opening lines of Frans De Waal's renowned book, 'The Age of Empathy: Nature's Lessons for a Kinder Society,' show us the new way of thinking. No longer can we protest that 'It's dog eat dog out there; Darwin made me do it!' Instead, De Waal argues that we have completely overstated the human instinct for selfishness and that most of us are really quite nice.

Stella O'Malley



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Parents Use Social Media To Share Experiences With Health Providers

Parents Use Social Media To Share Experiences With Health Providers | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

hildren tend to fear the unknown, and visiting the dentist is no different.

Following the voluntary surrender of Jacksonville dentist Dr. Howard Schneider’s license and pending class-action suit after accusations that he mistreated young patients, some parents are worried about leaving children alone in the care of medical professionals. They have taken to cautioning others via social media about their children’s experience with health care providers.

One such post has been particularly active, with 158 responses on Facebook sharing one man’s experience with a Gainesville dentist, and how he disagreed with the practice’s policy.

On May 11, Max Danford, 59, of Archer, Florida, took his 10-year-old grandson, Eli Danford, to visit Dr. Bertram Hughes of Family and Cosmetic Dentistry in Gainesville to fill a cavity. He said he was concerned when Hughes’ office staff refused to let him accompany his grandson into the exam room.

“He was nervous, as everyone is when they visit the dentist,” Danford said. “He wanted me to go back with him.”

Danford said Hughes and his staff told him it was office policy not to allow adults in the exam room with children, but he said they did not explain why their policy is this way.

After an exchange of words, according to Danford, Hughes advised him and his grandson to leave the office. The cavity remained unfilled. 

Danford turned to Facebook to voice his concerns about his grandson’s visit with Hughes. He posted to a Facebook group called Gainesville Word of Mouth and attracted more than 150 comments, some from parents who had expressed similar concerns with Hughes and other pediatric or family dentists in the area.

Donna Hicks of Gainesville, was among the many parents who commented on Danford’s Facebook post. She wrote that her husband had a similar experience with Hughes’ office.

Hick’s husband, Mike, took their 3-year-old son, Daniel, and 9-year-old daughter, Laila, to Hughes in April 2015 for a regular dental cleaning. This was the first time their son had ever been to see a dentist.

“My son is only 3. He can’t tell me what happened in the room,” Hicks said. “Even in a doctor’s office you are allowed back with your child.”

Danford said he filed a grievance against Hughes with his insurance company, Staywell, on May 12. Liberty Dental Plan, a subcontractor for Staywell, said no such claim had been filed as of July 1. Danford filed a grievance with Staywell again, on July 1, about his dissatisfaction with what he said was the rude treatment he and his grandson received from Hughes and his office staff.

In a letter dated July 8, Staywell said it would review the grievance filed by Danford and respond within 60 days of receiving the request. Danford had not heard from Staywell about the grievance at the time of publishing. The letter went on to say Danford has the right to ask for a Medicaid Fair Hearing. 

Hicks said she has not yet filed a claim against Hughes, but plans to do so.

The Florida Department of Health collects any complaints filed against a health care provider. Hughes has no public complaints or disciplinary actions on file, according to the department’s website. Hughes also has no complaints filed with the Better Business Bureau or Florida Board of Dentistry. 

The Florida Board of Dentistry is the state agency that leads investigations surrounding complaints. According to Moore Communications Group Senior Director, Liz Shawen, the Florida Board of Dentistry does not collect data surrounding these complaints because it is not a violation for dentists to not allow parents to be present during their children’s dental exams.

According to the the Florida Department of Health’s fiscal year 2013-2014 annual report, it received 977 complaints against dentists for reasons unknown. This number is the fourth highest number of complaints filed with the department, following medical doctors, certified nursing assistants and registered nurses.

Dr. Hughes, who has practiced dentistry for 25 years, declined to be interviewed for this story, but he did provide comment via e-mail:

“Due to HIPPA concerns we really aren’t able to completely discuss the gentleman’s post,” he wrote. He [Danford] is not telling you the full story, nor did he post a truly accurate account of events. Due to privacy laws, it’s often difficult for healthcare providers to respond to one-sided accounts posted on various sites on the internet.”

No Global Policy

Pediatric dentist and national spokesperson for American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, Dr. Carlos Bertot, said there is no state or federal guideline that requires any dentist to allow or deny a parent to be present during a procedure; it is up to the individual dentist.

“The primary reason for not allowing the parent back or to be present during the delivery of care is because, in general, children will behave better and be more cooperative in the parent’s absence,” Bertot said.

He said the same can be said about teachers, caregivers and counselors.

However, Bertot said he does allow parents to accompany their children during procedures, if necessary.

After reaching out to a dozen dentist’s offices in North Central Florida, half say they allow parents to be present during routine dental procedures. Two offices said they do not allow parents to be present for reasons including parents getting in the way of the dentist and needing the child’s full attention. The other four offices did not respond.

Dr. Rondre Baluyot, of Oaks Family Dentistry in Gainesville, uses a large room for young patients to accommodate the parents and sometimes an entire family. Hannah Runge/WUFT News

Dr. Rondre Baluyot of Oaks Family Dentistry in Gainesville,  who does allow parents to accompany their children into the exam room, said it’s important for parents to know the dentist has the authority in the exam room. This ensures the procedure goes well. If both the parent and the doctor try to give the child direction, it can confuse the child and prolong the procedure.

“I try to be a partner with the parent,” Baluyot said.

Baluyot offers “happy visits” for his young patients to feel out the atmosphere of the office. The visits are specifically designed to desensitize a first-time dental patient and lessen their fear of the dentist.

He is known for his character voices, a technique he uses to keep the visits fun and relaxing for his young patients. Baluyot’s office staff will, on occasion, dress up as Disney characters, such as Frozen’s Elsa.

Dr. Julie Russo, president of the Florida Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, said pediatric dentists have two additional years of training and are specially trained in behavior management techniques. The techniques vary and are used to help children cope during their dental visits.

“All patients are different and one method may work well for one child, by may not work with another. Once a parent chooses a pediatric dentist for their child, office policies and procedures should be discussed prior to the first dental appointment,” Russo said.

According to the AAPD’s Guideline on Behavior Guidance for the Pediatric Dental Patient, “Relationship and communication problems between parents and doctors, such as perceived lack of care or not taking enough time to explain a procedure, have played a prominent role in the initiation of malpractice actions.” The guideline also states, “Occasionally, the presence of a parent has a negative effect on the communication between the child and the dentist. Each practitioner has the responsibility to determine communication and support methods that best optimize treatment.”

Bertot said parents should trust their instincts and if something doesn’t sit well with them; they should seek out another dentist.

“At the end of the day, it’s all about the patient and what is best for that patient.”



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