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Stonework Play

What is Stonework Play?

 

 “Stonework Play is a form of creative learning. It engages the senses and animates imagination, allowing each person to tell a story or make a unique pattern suggested by handling the stones. The weight, form and texture of each stone suggest artistic choices that result in original work. 

 

The importance of Stonework Play is confirmed by Richard Luov’s research that tells us, “Every child needs nature. Not just the ones with parents who appreciate nature...every child.” He warns of the negative impact of a “nature-deprived society.” Stonework Play responds to the idea of nature's power to enrich the imagination. Stonework Play helps the artist, no matter how young, to explore and express emotions, thoughts and feelings through stone arrangements and the stories they elicit. Stones are a kinesthetic medium, never fixed in their place or meaning, the ground an endless canvas, and small hands the brushes that move them.”

 

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Whole Child Development
Emerging research on healthy physical, cognitive, social and emotional development.
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Helping Kids and Families Achieve with Cynthia Terebush, CPC, CYPFC: Today’s Generation Gap: How Will Today’s Children Cope?

Helping Kids and Families Achieve with Cynthia Terebush, CPC, CYPFC: Today’s Generation Gap: How Will Today’s Children Cope? | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
The 4th article in a series that candidly looks at the difference between today's youth and those of the past. How will children who are so indulged or entitled learn to cope with the challenges of adulthood?

Via Cindy Maloff Terebush, CPC, CYPFC
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The School of the Future has opened in Finland

The School of the Future has opened in Finland | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

Hopefully every school will be like this one day.


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Have a Heart Day via Cindy Blackstock

Have a Heart Day via Cindy Blackstock | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

via Cindy Blackstock: Calling friends in Alberta, Manitoba, Quebec, the Atlantic and in the North! Replace those zeroes on the Have a Heart day map with lots of Have a Heart day events to write letters to the Prime Minister so First Nations kids get the childhoods they deserve. More info at https://fncaringsociety.com/have-a-heart


Via Velvet Martin
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Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention

Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
The Pyramid Model for Promoting the Social and Emotional Development of Infants and Young Children is a conceptual framework of evidence-based practices developed by researchers and program developers in the areas of social skills and challenging behavior.

Via Steve Whitmore
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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, January 22, 2:56 PM

PBIS for younger children,

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10 Ways to Bring Active Learning To Your Classroom | Edudemic

10 Ways to Bring Active Learning To Your Classroom | Edudemic | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

Skills that prepare students for 21st century careers involve more than memorization; critical thinking, collaboration and problem solving are key.


Via karenpinney
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How to Teach Kids Empathy Through Dance

How to Teach Kids Empathy Through Dance | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

Schools are increasingly using movement and expression as vehicles for teaching kids social-emotional skills.


Poindexter is a teaching artist for Dancing Classrooms, a nonprofit based in New York City that brings ballroom dancing to schools primarily in underserved communities.


Started by the dancer Pierre Dulaine in 1994, the 10-week program was featured in the 2005 documentary Mad Hot Ballroom and uses ballroom as a vehicle for teaching elementary- and middle-schoolers social-emotional skills like respect and teamwork and, by extension, empathy.


For many underprivileged students, in-class time with programs like Dancing Classrooms is the only time they will have regular exposure to the arts

AUDREY CLEO YAP
 


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Putting Students in the Driver's Seat: Projects to Decrease Passivity

Putting Students in the Driver's Seat: Projects to Decrease Passivity | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Passivity still seems to be the norm for most college courses: students passively try to learn information from teachers who unwittingly cultivate a passive attitude in their learners. As the subject matter experts, many faculty are reluctant to give up some control. We know the material, there’s a lot to cover, and let’s face it, going the lecture route is often just plain easier for everyone. We “get through” the material, and students aren’t pressed to do anything more than sit back and take notes. Teacher and student thus become complicit in creating a passive learning environment.

Technology becomes an accomplice in the crime of passivity. When teachers think about technology, the goal is often to have students interact with instructor-created multimedia. Learners will watch a screencast or complete an online quiz. Sometimes the learner will interact with technology by doing a simulation or completing homework online. The assignments themselves are distinctly teacher-directed. All of this direction by the teacher equates to students learning to drive by sitting in the passenger seat.

What if we let students drive? Putting students in control may seem a bit frightening. The students will not be nearly as smooth in their driving as we are. We will not be able to reach the brake if things go badly. But learning to drive requires time behind the wheel, and learning course material requires that students become co-creators of knowledge rather than recipients of information.

Surprisingly, the solution to the problem of passivity might be the same accomplice that contributed to that passivity: technology. By putting technology in the hands of students, we put the learner behind the wheel. Instead of the teacher being the only one who works with technology to create learning objects, students become creators of learning objects.

Via Miloš Bajčetić, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects'

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy. Only far eastern countries such as Singapore and China outperform the Nordic nation in the influential Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) rankings. Politicians and education experts from around the world – including the UK – have made pilgrimages to Helsinki in the hope of identifying and replicating the secret of its success.
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Instructivism vs Connectivism vs Social Learning

Instructivism vs Connectivism vs Social Learning | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
One of the common problems with designing a course is that you have to use words to communicate what you want people to do. But people already have attached meaning to those words, which may or may not line up with commonly accepted norms. “Social Learning” is a term that I find causes the most confusion with customizable pathways design. Many, many people think that instructivism is not social at all, and that all social learning is connectivism (and connectivism has to be social in order to be connectivist).

The problem is – neither concept is true. Instructivism can be social, and connectivism does not have to be social.

In the literature, instructivism is sometimes connected to closed lectures and multiple choices tests, but for the most part it is connected with instructor-led content and activities. This can be anything from discussion forums (which can be social) to group assignments to Twitter activities. Yes, a Twitter activity in a course can be instructivist. If an instructor tells learners to go out and create a Twitter account, and then gives them a list of things to Tweet and respond to in order to fulfill an assignment, that is instructivism… and it is social. Social presence is a large field of research that is basically dedicated to figuring out how to improve an instructivist paradigm with social learning designs.

On the other hand, while connectivism is often very social, it doesn’t have to be social to still be connectivist. For example, go back to one of the foundational papers on connectivism (and probably one of the most quoted) and look at what connectivism is. Did you notice the part in there about off-loading learning to non-human agents? What this means is this: a learner can do a Google search on a topic and end up reading a Wikipedia article about the topic and that is still connectivism. They were not social at all, but they connected to the knowledge of others to learn about a topic. The connection occurred with a non-human agent.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
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Transgender Kids: What Does It Take to Help Them Thrive?

Transgender Kids: What Does It Take to Help Them Thrive? | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

A debate is growing among experts over how to meet their urgent needs

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Capacity Building and Development : How to Put Metacognition in Process for Teachers 02-07

Capacity Building and Development : How to Put Metacognition in Process for Teachers 02-07 | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

How 2 Put Metacognition in Process 4 Teachers.#Metacognition, #Teaching,#learning,#comprehension,#StudentEvaluation, https://t.co/7sPihs1fP9

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This new app claims it can translate your baby’s crying sounds to predict what’s wrong

This new app claims it can translate your baby’s crying sounds to predict what’s wrong | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

A new app called Infant Cries Translator, made by Taiwanese medical researchers, claims it can translate a baby's crying sounds to predict what's wrong.

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Threat of Guns and Car Accidents Linked to Parental Depression

Threat of Guns and Car Accidents Linked to Parental Depression | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

Neuroscience News has recent neuroscience research articles, brain research news, neurology studies and neuroscience resources for neuroscientists, students, and science fans and is always free to join.

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Education Through Students' Eyes: A Dry-Erase Animated Video

Education Through Students' Eyes: A Dry-Erase Animated Video | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

"Two students from Georgia share their what education looks like through their eyes with a dry-erase animated video."


Via Beth Dichter, Hector Cortez
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 18, 2015 6:40 AM

Listen to two softmores present their views on education in this short (~6 minute) video. What do they talk about? Here are the five points listed in the original post:

* Teachers’ view versus students’ view of school schedules.

* School systems’ expectations of students versus students’ own expectations of themselves.

* Purpose, application, and importance of certain curricula.

* The practice of not asking the most important people of all…the students.

* Ignoring successful educational models, such as Finland.

Many of us have seen education go through major changes, and these students raise some questions that all of us need to consider. Take the time to view this video, and consider sharing it with others at your school. 

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:45 AM

Listen to two softmores present their views on education in this short (~6 minute) video. What do they talk about? Here are the five points listed in the original post:

* Teachers’ view versus students’ view of school schedules.

* School systems’ expectations of students versus students’ own expectations of themselves.

* Purpose, application, and importance of certain curricula.

* The practice of not asking the most important people of all…the students.

* Ignoring successful educational models, such as Finland.

Many of us have seen education go through major changes, and these students raise some questions that all of us need to consider. Take the time to view this video, and consider sharing it with others at your school. 

Frances's curator insight, February 8, 8:57 AM

Q:  At what age do students formulate their views of what "education" should be?

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Study finds a third of schoolkids with autism wander from safety each year

Study finds a third of schoolkids with autism wander from safety each year | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
First nationwide survey on wandering underscores need to better safeguard school-age children with developmental disabilities

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Can the "Critical Periods" Be Reinstated Later in Life to Correct Developmental Problems?

Can the "Critical Periods" Be Reinstated Later in Life to Correct Developmental Problems? | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
A neuroscientist from Harvard studies how to restore the malleability of a child’s brain later in life

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Frances's curator insight, January 25, 8:12 AM

How much do we know about how the brain works?

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CSEFEL: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning

CSEFEL: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) is focused on promoting the social emotional development and school readiness of young children birth to age 5. CSEFEL is a national resource center funded by the Office of Head Start and Child Care Bureau for disseminating research and evidence-based practices to early childhood programs across the country.

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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, January 22, 2:58 PM

Another resource for Early Childhood PBIS.

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Teaching empathy to children

Teaching empathy to children | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

Working with kids to define empathy, a word that’s missing from Nova Scotia’s education curriculum...

And this is where teaching empathy gets more complicated than teaching a subject with standard right or wrong answers.


The key, explains Ryan, is for people to take time to understand what the best response might be. This means taking into account your own capabilities, but also, since we’re talking about empathy, after all, considering it from the perspective of the person you’re trying to help.

A child who understands that his mother is very tired because she’s been working hard might respond by being extra quiet on a Saturday morning so she can sleep in, or the child might respond by offering to do more chores to make her life easier. (Where can I get one of these kids?)


CHARMAINE DYMOND 


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Childhood Depression and Altered Brain Connectivity Linked to Poverty

Childhood Depression and Altered Brain Connectivity Linked to Poverty | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Functional MRI scans show areas in the brains of poor children with normal connectivity highlighted in red and blue, and weakened connectivity shown in green. The areas in green are among several areas — detailed in other brain scans — where connections are weakened in children raised in poverty. Credit: Deanna Barch.

 

"Many negative consequences are linked to growing up poor, and researchers at Washington University St. Louis have identified one more: altered brain connectivity.

Analyzing brain scans of 105 children ages 7 to 12, the researchers found that key structures in the brain are connected differently in poor children than in kids raised in more affluent settings. In particular, the brain’s hippocampus — a structure key to learning, memory and regulation of stress — and the amygdala — which is linked to stress and emotion — connect to other areas of the brain differently in poor children than in kids whose families had higher incomes.

Those connections, viewed using functional MRI scans, were weaker, depending on the degree of poverty to which a child was exposed. The poorer the family, the more likely the hippocampus and amygdala would connect to other brain structures in ways the researchers characterized as weaker. In addition, poorer preschoolers were much more likely to have symptoms of clinical depression when they reached school age.

The study is available online Friday, Jan. 15, in The American Journal of Psychiatry."

 

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Interaction during reading is key to language development

Interaction during reading is key to language development | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Interaction, not just the sound of words being read from a page, is the key to language development during reading.

That’s according to a new study from the University of Iowa that looked at how mothers responded to their 12-month-olds during book reading, puppet play, and toy play. What researchers found is the babies made more speech-like sounds during reading than when playing with puppets or toys. They also discovered mothers were more responsive to these types of sounds while reading to their child than during the other activities.

The findings might explain why book reading has been linked to language development in young children.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
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How Curiosity Enhances Learning - InformED

How Curiosity Enhances Learning - InformED | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
When we talk about curiosity and learning, we tend to talk about it from an engagement perspective. If students remain interested in and curious about a topic, they will pay more attention and, ultimately, learn more. But this isn’t the whole story, and we’re doing ourselves a disservice by cutting it short.

It might seem obvious that curiosity and learning go hand-in-hand, but the scientific community sees it differently. Until very recently, there hasn’t been much published researched on how curiosity works in the brain. It’s a difficult phenomenon to describe, let alone study. But the latest neuroscience tells us that one mental process in particular benefits from curiosity, a process crucial to learning and education in general, and it just so happens to be the missing part of the conversation: memory.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
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Report: Distracted Parenting Hampers Child Brain Development

Report: Distracted Parenting Hampers Child Brain Development | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it
Report: Distracted Parenting Hampers Child Brain Development
Public News Service - TX | January 2016 | Download audioAlcohol and Drug Abuse PreventionChildren's IssuesEarly Childhood EducationFamily/Father IssuesHealth IssuesMental Health



New research indicates such distractions as mobile phone use that interrupt a parent's care and bonding time with infants, may impair a child's brain development. (ATA/Wikimedia Commons)
January 8, 2016
AUSTIN, Texas - Parents, put down your smartphones when you're taking care of your baby. That's the message from University of California researchers, who found that fragmented care can disrupt a young child's brain development and lead to emotional disorders later in life.

When moms and dads are bonding with infants, said report co-author Hal Stern, a professor at the University of California at Irvine, such everyday interruptions as phone calls and text messages can have long-lasting impact.

"It speaks to the importance of having regular patterns in your interactions with your child," he said, "and a clear way to do that would be to kind of set the phone aside when it's reading time or play time."

Even though the study's first phase focused on rodents, Stern said it showed that distractions can break the consistent rhythms that developing brains need to ensure the growth of robust neuron networks. He said children need greater assurance that when a parent picks up a book, for instance, that time really is reserved for them.

Researchers found that erratic care of infants can increase the likelihood of risky behaviors, drug and alcohol use, and depression in adolescence and adult life. Stern said that because mobile phones are so ubiquitous and bring an endless stream of calls, texts and social-media posts, the group's findings are especially important for today's parents.

"As children become adolescents," he said, "one might expect effects on risk-taking behaviors, and an increased risk of emotional disorders and the like."

Stern said the next step is to see how these discoveries in rodent behavior apply to people. The team plans to use video analysis of parent care and imaging technology to measure brain development, to find out if limiting distractions today can help prevent problems for tomorrow's teens and adults.

The study is online at contecenter.uci.edu.
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Lead Exposure Linked to ADHD in Kids with Genetic Mutation - Association for Psychological Science

Lead Exposure Linked to ADHD in Kids with Genetic Mutation - Association for Psychological Science | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

Exposure to miniscule amounts of lead may contribute to ADHD symptoms in children who have a particular gene mutation, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of […]...

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To the 1 percent pouring millions into charter schools: How about improving the schools that the vast majority of students actually attend?

To the 1 percent pouring millions into charter schools: How about improving the schools that the vast majority of students actually attend? | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

If we really want to improve education for all, we must address income inequality. Charter schools are no cure-all

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What's Behind Brazil's Alarming Surge in Babies Born with Small Heads

What's Behind Brazil's Alarming Surge in Babies Born with Small Heads | Whole Child Development | Scoop.it

Zika typically causes flulike aches and rash, but the rapidly spreading disease is fueling global worries about tiny-headed infants and brain damage

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