Who cares about safety?
26 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Safety training and worker induction - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland

Safety training and worker induction - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland | Who cares about safety? | Scoop.it
A stuctured outline designed for employers, registered training organisations, vocational education students and the Queensland Building Services Authority.
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

Asbestos is widely recognised as a silent killer with particular emphasis within the construction industry.  This source makes evident that asbestos is acutally a 'generic term for a number of fibrous silicate minerals. Products made from asbestos cement - a bonded asbestos material - include fibro sheeting (flat and corrugated) as well as water, drainage and flue pipes, roofing shingles and guttering' (Department of Justice and Attorney-General 2014). 

 

Following from this, the source further identifies the impacts on health of those exposed and as Steve is responsible for the safety of workers on-site, this site is highly relevant.  The safe work procedures when working with asbestos are also identified which is critical information for all workers on the construction site.  As seen with most procedures in the construction industry, legislation which governs the policies and procedures with asbestos need to be made readily available from the Work Health and Safety Act (2011). 

 

Asbestos continues to claim the lives of workers in today's society, therefore it is imperative for Steve, who has the most influence on the safety of workers on-site must have a sound understanding of asbestos handling and removal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Work Health and Safety Act 2011

"An Act relating to work health and safety, and for related purposes"

Nicholas Rowland's insight:

The Work Health and Safety Act (2011) also regarded as the Work Health and Safety Regulations (2011) is an imperative piece of legislation which governs the operations and processes of workplaces including the construction industry.  Steve, as a supervisor is required and has a legal obligation to ensure that workers are performing in accordance to the act to maintain an efficient level of health and safety on-site.

 

It is important for Steve to utilise this source as changes and ammendments are continually being made in order to keep pace with the rapid changes in our society's workplaces.  For any workers that have a duty of care responsibility are required to be aware of this essential document.  As well as identifying how to spot hazards and minimise risk, the act explains the legal proceedings and enforcement measures that are applied in the scenario of an accident.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Work at heights - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland

A person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) must manage the risk of a fall from one level to another where it is likely that the person would be injured by the fall.
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

This article highlights one of the most common causes of workplace injuries within the construction industry, resulting from working at heights.  It identifies the specific height at which control measures should be implemented in both housing and commercial sites in order to significantly reduce the risk of falling. 

 

To further enhance the understanding of working at heights and the legal procedures that must be followed, the article provides examples of how to respond and apply the correct procedure through different scenarios.  Construction sites must comply with the Work Health and Safet Regualtion 2011 and by analysing this article, Steve would be able to utilise the areas indentified and apply this knowledge to his own 'real life' situations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Belinda cares about safety in the bank...

Belinda cares about safety in the bank... | Who cares about safety? | Scoop.it

Meet Belinda who works in the Bank of Queensland Stafford branch in Brisbane's north.  Belinda has around 4 years experience in the banking industry working as a customer service officer.  It is Belinda's responsibility to ensure the safety of customers within the branch by identifying hazards and communicating procedures to take in the event of an emergency.  

Nicholas Rowland's insight:

The banking industry is a workplace that surprisingly involves more physical stresses than I believe people realise.  Staff who are working at the tellers are required to stand for most of the day, whilst those in the office sit at their desk, it is obvious that ergonomic hazards are present.  As staff are required to perform either on their feet or at their desk each day, the risk of developing severe back pain is high.  

 

As well as ergonomic hazards, staff carry large bags of coins to put into the safe.  Belinda explained that "we put $2000 worth of $2 coins in one bag".  With this in mind you can imagine that these bags are not exactly light!  There are procedures that staff are required to follow by the bank to ensure correct manual loading methods are being used.  This further increases the risk of developing severe back problems if procedures are ignored.

 

When it comes to a bank it's pretty safe to say that the most terrifying hazard is security in regards to the risk of a bank robbery.  Both staff and customers are involved in robberies and they can have both serious physical and mental ramifications.  Belinda is required to keep up to date with the banks anti-bandit procedures and inform all staff and customers the procedures in the event of a robbery.  Belinda highlighted that "people seem to think that this won't happen to our branch, but the reality is these things happen and when they do we need to be prepared". 

 

After observing the hazards within the banking industry my perception on the job has certainly been altered.  The physical strains staff experience have the potential to cause long term injury due to the repetition required.  Belinda concluded that "the policies and procedures we follow are ultimately for our benefit, without them our health and safety are exposed to very real risks".  To stand on your feet all day or sit at a desk all day?  Not sure if I could choose!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Sarah cares about safety in McDonald's...

Sarah cares about safety in McDonald's... | Who cares about safety? | Scoop.it

Would you like fries with that? 

Sarah works for the iconic golden arches, regarded as one of the largest companies in the world McDonald's introduce young employees to following procedures for both their own and customers' health and safety.  Sarah, who has been working at McDonald's for just over 3 years knows how to indentify hazards within the workplace.

Nicholas Rowland's insight:

The most common hazards that occur within the fast food industry are slippery floors, with most of McDonalds' hazards resulting in slips, trips and falls.  As I also work at McDonald's I can personally tell you now that shoes with a lot of grip are essential! Oil on tiled floors creates a serious risk when rushing to get orders out.  To try and reduce the amount of oil on the floors, employees are required to mop regularly however this still creates extremely slippery floors. 

 

Cooking fries, meat patties and nuggets involves a great amount of heat, enter our next hazard!  Grill plates, deep fry vats and coffee machines all present the likely risk of burns.  Operating this equipment has the potential to cause serious burns and whilst working at speed accidents are likely to result.  McDonald's employees are timed to get the meals out as fast as possible , as a result of workers rushing, attention to hazards decreases and consequently increases the risk of an accident and/or injury occurring.

 

Industries involving food require extensive hygiene procdures to ensure the quality of food leaving the kitchen is safe.  Specific timers and temperatures are set for each product that is cooked and held.  Both managers and crew memners are required to sustain a high level of food safety by following all cooking procedures.

 

Another hazard identified in the fast food franchise was the operation of electrical equipment.  To assist employees with the speed at which orders are sent, machines and other electrical equipment is regurlarly being used.  Employees are trained on isolating electrical equipment when the risk of injury is evident,  McDonald's strongly promotes the application of health and safety systems within its stores. 

 

With most of its employees under the age of 20, it is imperative that clear and efficient safety procedures are in place.  Employees are required to learn and apply these procedures in the workplace at an early age and I believe future employers look favourably upon individuals who have experience in large fast food companies such as McDonald's.  It may look simple in practice, however McDonald's stores contain many hazards that have the potential to cause serious injuries without proper procedures.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Confined spaces on construction sites - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland

Confined spaces on construction sites - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland | Who cares about safety? | Scoop.it
Confined spaces that may be found on a construction site include some types of excavations or trenches, drainage or sewerage pipes, and crawl spaces.
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

Working within a confined space presents a range of hazards and without careful consideration and guidelines the risk of injury would dramatically increase.  This site allows for readers to easily indentify the legislation regarding confined spaces and how to manage workers in this environment. 

 

The source highlights communication as a key element when working in confined spaces.  Specifically communication between workers and managers/supervisors to ensure that the assessment of risks is continually kept up to date.  This source is extremely useful as it saves managers and suprvisors a lot of time in understanding the relevant legislation regarding confined spaces rather than searching through the entire Work Health and Safety Act (2011).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Construction Work Code of Practice

"An approved code of practice is a practical guide to achieving the standards of health, safety and welfare required under the WHS Act and the Work Health and Safety Regulations"

Nicholas Rowland's insight:

The Construction Work Code of Practice (2013) provides the fundamental information needed when working within the industry as it provides 'guidance to principal contractors and other persons conducting a business or undertaking who carry out construction work on how to meet the health and safety requirements under the WHS Act and Regulations relating to construction work' (Safe Work Australia 2013).

 

The code explains essential terms and codes used by workers around the site and goes into further detail on the roles and duties of workers relating to construction work.  More importantly the code explains the importance of indentifying hazards on a construction sites, most common hazards and how to minimise the risk of accidents occurring (indentifying, assessing and controlling risks).  It is the responsibility of supervisors and managers to ensure that performance is compliant with the Work Health and Safety Regulation (2011), to make compliance easier the code highlights what is required for operations to be within these guidlines which is critical for all construction companies.  This source is extremely useful for those working in the contruction industry as in touches on many essential areas regarding safety on construction sites.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Steve cares about safety in construction...

Steve cares about safety in construction... | Who cares about safety? | Scoop.it

Steve works for Lanskey Constructions and specialises in managing the construction of McDonald's stores across Queensland and New South Wales.  Conducting business with such large companies like McDonald's requires efficient management by Steve to ensure time frames are met and obstacles such as health and safety are controlled.  Steve has grown up with construction being throughout his working life, from getting his apprenticeship in year 10, to managing construction sites today.  With such knowledge and experience in the industry Steve has seen the development of health and safety become a fundamental aspect in today's construction management.

Nicholas Rowland's insight:

The construction industry is recognised as one of the most dangerous places to work in due to the many hazards that arise that have the potential to cause serious injury or death.

 

What types of hazards can you expect to find within the construction industry? Where do we start?

 

The physical demands required by workers sees manual handling as a common hazard, causing muscle and/or skeletal injury.  Steve was able to explain that this is an extremely common hazard in construction as he too is suffering from back injury after working in the industry for so many years. 

 

Another noticeable hazard when on-site was workers' exposure to UV and the amount of time spent in the sun.  This hazard has the potential to cause injury through the development of skin cancer if PPE in regards to sun safety is ignored. 

 

Electrical hazards are seen throughout any construction site, power tools and heavy machinery are continuously being operated.  Steve explains that this is one of the highest risks in a construction site, maintenance and tagging is completed on a regular monthly basis with random inspections to occur within each month.  As workers are continuously using this equipment and the potential injury caused is extreme, assessing electrical risks is imperative.

 

Tripping hazards are also commonly seen in the construction environment.  Tools and materials are piled in places that workers may not be aware of and without efficient signs or barriers the risk of causing an injury is greatly increased.

 

Tsk, tsk! Have a look at the picture, no hard-hat Steve!  The construction industry is well known for objects to fall off buildings, machines or vehicles and therefore hard-hats are a must have and must be worn. 

 

It is widely known that the construction industry is an environment where hazards thrive.  With health and safety continuing to become more and more important in the industry it is my goal to work in this industry and make an impact on the health and safety of workers in construction.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Kristen cares about safety in school...

Kristen cares about safety in school... | Who cares about safety? | Scoop.it

Kristen is a high school teacher at St. Catherine's Catholic school in Proserpine, North Queensland.  This is her first year in full-time teaching after graduating from the University of Queensland in 2013.  Kristen is responsible for not only her health and safety, but also a classroom filled with children eager and some not so eager to learn.

Nicholas Rowland's insight:

Classrooms contain a variety of hazards all of which have the potential to injure teachers and students if health and safety procedures are ignored.

 

Hazards that can be identified within a classroom may include:

 

Manual handling

As teachers are required to lift and carry textbooks, equipment and possibly move furniture with certain activities.  Moving from classroom to classroom with a bag of heavy books can be quite strenuous.  Kristen highlighted that on arrival to the school she was informed on the procedures needed for heavy lifting.

 

Hazardous Chemicals and Equipment

The science lab involves the use of many chemicals and hazardous equipment which have the potential to cause damage such as burns.  Teachers and students are required to wear PPE including safety glasses, gloves, lab coats, enclosed shoes etc. In regards to the operation of equipment, for example bunsen burners, teachers are firstly required to complete their training in all scientific equipment and earn licenses to operate the equipment.  Students are then required to do the same.

 

Germs and Bacteria

Working in an environment surrounded by teenagers is the perfect breeding ground for germs and bacteria.  Sick leave is a regular occurrence in the teaching industry and in order to maintain a healthy and hygienic classroom, Kristen is required to wipe down tables and chairs at the end of each day.

 

The teaching industry requires all staff to implement efficient health and safety procedures to create a healthy learning environment.  They are responsible for the health and safety of children whilst under their care and thefore must always be aware of surrounding hazards and maintain the risk to a minimal level.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicholas Rowland
Scoop.it!

Wade cares about safety in motorsport...

Wade cares about safety in motorsport... | Who cares about safety? | Scoop.it

Foot to the floor and racing up to speeds over 200km an hour with cars side-by-side around some of Australia's toughest tracks, it is obvious Wade's passion is living on the edge.  By participating in one of the most dangerous sports, Wade must apply and abide to many health and safety regulations to ensure he and other drivers are able to step out of the car at the end of the day...

Nicholas Rowland's insight:

At only age 20, Wade knows all about the importance of health and safety and the requirement to adhere to many, many regulations.  While most things seem quite obvious when it comes to safety in motorsport... Just don't crash!  The amount of health and safety systems in place within the motorsport industry extends much further than preventing crashes.

 

As you can see in the image, Wade's PPE includes a full racing suit, boots and the helmet and gloves to go with it.  But it's what you can't see that also plays a vital role in protecting Wade from a fiery situation.  Everything from head to toe (literally everything including socks and underwear) must be of Nomex material which is able to protect drivers from fire for a longer period of time.  Underneath the helmet Wade wears a balaclava of Nomex material to also protect his face.  The helmet must comply with racing standards as debri can impact the head at devastating speeds.  A HANS device (head and neck support) must be worn in case of frontal impact, this resticts the head and neck violently jerking forward upon impact and is made of carbon fibre material.  Everything Wade puts on before entering the car plays a vital role in protecting him from many consequences.

 

Every millimetre counts in this sport as Wade describes the engineering requirements of the car to comply with regulations.  Each and every part of the race car is designed to bend and break at certain points to ensure parts don't protrude the cockpit and absorb the maximum amount of energy possible in a crash.  All electrical equipment must be tested and tagged, including chargers, extension leads, power boards, drill guns, power tools and pretty much anything that requires power basically! At anytime where fuel is being used a 4.5kg fire extinguisher must be held present.  Wade exclaims the importance of comlying with fuel safety procedures as teams can't have more than 20L of fuel in the garage at any time and needs to be stored in a designated area.

 

Wade described to me that the list of procedures require to follow is endless, everything you see in the garage, on the car or on me has a health and safety background.  So I asked the question, are the regulations too excessive? He answered, "sometimes you think they are excessive, but no, they are definitely suitable and 100% necessary.  Safety is a huge part of motorsport and regulations are always changing to try and improve it".  The most important message that Wade takes from health and safety in motorsport is, "at the end of the day, the regulations are there to help save your life in the event of an incident, and when there is one, you are thankful for all the rules and regulations that need to be followed".

more...
No comment yet.