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The Future Librarian
Anything and everything about new trends in librarianship and learning through libraries.
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IFLA Trend Report

IFLA Trend Report | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it
In the global information environment, time moves quickly and there's an abundance of commentators trying to keep up. With each new technological development, a new report emerges assessing its impact on different sectors of society. The IFLA Trend Report takes a broader approach and identifies five high level trends shaping the information society, spanning access to education, privacy, civic engagement and transformation. Its findings reflect a year’s consultation with a range of experts and stakeholders from different disciplines to map broader societal changes occurring, or likely to occur in the information environment. The IFLA Trend Report is more than a single document – it is a selection of resources to help you understand where libraries fit into a changing society.
Fe Angela M. Verzosa's insight:
The IFLA Trend Report identifies five top level trends which will play a key role in shaping our future information ecosystem. Download the Insights Document which serves as the conversation starter for the library community.
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Deborah Welsh's curator insight, August 28, 2013 5:10 PM

Essential reading for those who believe in the value of libraries.

Dawne Tortorella's curator insight, August 28, 2013 8:21 PM

New technologies, online education, privacy & data protection, hyper-connected societies, global information - same trends, more accelerated?

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The digital age is forcing libraries to change. Here’s what that looks like.

The digital age is forcing libraries to change. Here’s what that looks like. | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it
The new Digital Commons shows how libraries are responding to the needs of their patrons in the modern age.
Fe Angela M. Verzosa's insight:
Libraries are transforming themselves into technology hubs since the Internet became the primary way of gathering information~as a community space that enables access to technology and a source of digital literacy. Read more: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-switch/wp/2013/08/07/the-digital-age-is-forcing-libraries-to-change-heres-what-that-looks-like/
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Kris McGlaun's curator insight, August 19, 2013 5:21 AM

Libraries are evolving to meet its patrons needs

Freek Kraak's curator insight, August 22, 2013 4:51 AM

Natuurlijk moet je alle moderne middelen gebruiken, maar m.i. toch een eenzijdig tech-verhaal. Misschien daarom zo provocerend...!

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In Praise of Traditional Libraries

In Praise of Traditional Libraries | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

Some librarians like to disparage something they call the “traditional library.” The reasons vary depending on circumstances, and understanding the criticism is made more difficult because no one seems to agree on what a “traditional library” is.

 

This article speaks of traditional libraries rather than “the traditional library” because libraries vary widely, and the only fair way to discuss academic libraries is in generalities. There might be one single library somewhere that would embody everything “traditional,” but most libraries are amalgamations of changes over time. It’s only by looking at the whole that we can make such general statements about libraries.

 

Traditional academic libraries discovered problems and solved them, adapting to the demands of new scholarship, embracing new media of communication, and developing appropriate organizational and cooperative schemes, in a steady march of progress over the course of the twentieth century away from the tiny, inaccessible, and inadequate historical libraries that had preceded them.

 

Perhaps, as some now say, the traditional library is dead, which is not so, given the enormous benefit traditional libraries have provided for research and education in the country over the past century. If it is so, whatever replaces them is as successful at collecting information, organizing it, and making it as accessible and useful as possible to scholars and students as traditional libraries were. They were good things, traditional libraries, and we will miss them when they’re gone.

Fe Angela M. Verzosa's insight:

Some librarians like to disparage something they call the “traditional library.” The reasons vary depending on circumstances, and understanding the criticism is made more difficult because no one seems to agree on what a “traditional library” is. This article speaks of traditional libraries, rather than the traditional library. 

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Defining “Transformation”

Defining “Transformation” | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

"The very nature of what we do and how we do it is undergoing fundamental changes"

 

While the dramatic growth in the use of ebooks and other digital content has attracted the greatest media attention regarding library services in the past couple of years, equally dramatic changes are occurring in almost every dimension of our work.

 

The reality is that libraries are experiencing a number of transformations. These include fundamental changes in our:

communities

community relationships

user expectations and user services

collections

physical space

library workforce

library leadership

Fe Angela M. Verzosa's insight:

Visit the newest ALA website, the Transforming Libraries portal (http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/) where "the digital content and leadership areas are shaping up as significant resources for libraries looking to learn about—and share—innovative and transformative ideas."

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Academic Libraries Should Give Up Book-by-Book Collecting

Academic Libraries Should Give Up Book-by-Book Collecting | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

To stay robust and relevant, academic libraries may need to abandon hands-on collection development and big deal subscription packages in favor of patron-driven acquisitions (PDA), open access, and curation of campus specialties.

 

David W. Lewis, dean of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) University Library, in his article entitled "From Stacks to the Web: the Transformation of Academic Library Collecting", predicts that the academic library world will radically restructure itself in the next eight years. He forecasts that by 2020, effectively all content delivery will have become digital. 

 

He suggests,  "If academic libraries are to be successful, they will need to: deconstruct legacy print collections; move from item-by-item book selection to purchase-on-demand and subscriptions; manage the transition to open access journals; focus on curating unique items; and develop new mechanisms for funding national infrastructure."

View/download his article here:

http://crl.acrl.org/content/early/2012/01/09/crl-309.full.pdf+html

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Library futures: University of Oxford

Library futures: University of Oxford | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it
We need to shape the skills of library staff to meet user needs while maintaining specialist knowledge, says Richard Ovenden
Fe Angela M. Verzosa's insight:

The Bodleian's problems and its great strengths both stem from the reality of its vast scale: maintaining major collections, buildings, skills, and scope of activity requires equally considerable resources to sustain and develop them – financial, human, and intellectual. As higher education becomes increasingly global and connected, and as the use of digital media expands and changes so rapidly, keeping pace with the demands of users at all levels is a major challenge for the Bodleian, especially when graduate students and researchers come with high expectations from their previous institutions which may have libraries which are better resourced.

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The Future of Libraries: Short on Books, Long on Tech

The Future of Libraries: Short on Books, Long on Tech | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it
“There’s a lot of talk about how libraries should change, but very few ideas of how they should be shaped,” said Vaughn Tan, a member of the Harvard‘s University Library project. “Every library should figure out what they want to be and just do that.” Some may think libraries a dying relic, but surprisingly, people still go there to use computers, often to look for work or beef up their tech skills. Small businesses and community organizations also use study rooms for office and meeting spaces. And according to a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation report, nearly half of Americans living below the poverty line access e-mail and the Web from libraries, highlighting how they’re still an important staple in the community. Technology crippled libraries, but they’re also helping them keep apace, as more people pick up e-readers at the cost of physical books. In the past year, a quarter of Americans read an e-book, and as of November, about one-third reported owning an e-reader or tablet, according to a Pew survey. “It is a most exciting time for libraries. Books are still important, but libraries are also delivering content and experiences to their communities in new, very different and exciting ways.” A shift is needed. To move libraries from places where you look up facts to those where you learn skills and engage in new experiences. Instead of “shushing” librarians and stilted study rooms, libraries often have integrated art galleries, coffee shops and even cafeterias. Read more: http://techland.time.com/2013/06/25/the-future-of-libraries-short-on-books-long-on-tech/
Fe Angela M. Verzosa's insight:
Libraries are doing what they’ve always done: adapting to technology.
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Libraries of the Future [VISUALIZATION] | LibraryScienceList.com

Libraries of the Future [VISUALIZATION] | LibraryScienceList.com | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

This infographic shows the evolution of information search and usage, and the evolving roles of the future librarian.  It was adapted from PewInternet.com, from a keynote address for the 2012 State University of New York Librarians Association Annual Conference.

Fe Angela M. Verzosa's insight:

This infographic shows the evolution of information search and usage, and the evolving roles of the future librarian (as evaluator, filter, certifier, aggregator, organizer, networker, and facilitator).  Click here to view the infographic: http://librarysciencelist.com/libraries-of-the-future-visualization/

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2012 Top Ten Trends in Academic Libraries

2012 Top Ten Trends in Academic Libraries | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

The Association of College & Research Libraries continuously scan for trends in academic librarianship and higher education. To do this they attend conferences, review the literature and contact experts in the field. Recently, they held a discussion forum to discuss these trends and come up with the most important trends affecting academic libraries today:  http://www.libfocus.com/2012/09/2012-top-ten-trends-in-academic.html

 

The complete article can be found here: http://crln.acrl.org/content/73/6/311.full

 

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2012 top ten trends in academic libraries

2012 top ten trends in academic libraries | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

The ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee responsible for identifying the ACRL “top ten trends” for release every two years has just released the 2012 top ten trends in academic libraries. These top trends are listed alphabetically. Each trend includes a brief discussion and references to the literature. These trends focus on the following issues:

*Communicating value

*Data curation

*Digital preservation

*Higher education - rise of online instruction

*Information technology - access to social media and networks anytime/anywhere

*Mobile environments

*Patron driven e-book acquisition

*Scholarly communication

*Staffing

*User behaviors and expectations

 

Download the article here : 

http://crln.acrl.org/content/73/6/311.full.pdf+html ;

Read a related post here: http://mhpbooks.com/the-challenges-facing-academic-libraries-in-the-21st-century/

 

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