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The Future Librarian
Anything and everything about new trends in librarianship and learning through libraries.
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The Survey of Academic Library Subject Specialists: Biology & Medical Sciences

The Survey of Academic Library Subject Specialists: Biology & Medical Sciences | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

This study looks closely at the collection development and spending plans of library specialists in medicine and biology, predominantly from medical schools and PhD-level or research universities in the United States, Canada, the UK, and Australia/New Zealand. Participants include Carnegie-Mellon, Harvard University, Rice University, McGill University, Sanofi-Aventis, University of Auckland, University of Manitoba, University of Pittsburgh, and many others.

 

The study also looks at medical and biology subject specialist perceptions of materials price increases, spending on e-books, information literacy requirements in medicine/biology, contributions to the materials budget from academic departments, book and monograph purchases, database preferences and renewal plans, use of university presses, use of institutional digital repositories, trends in budget and staffing, relations with library patrons, monitoring of faculty publications as an aid in collection development decision-making, and other issues in medical/biology librarianship.

 

Read some of the summary of its significant findings here: http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/2dp84h/the_survey_of

 

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Pew Study Suggests Libraries (And Print) Still Have A Future In An E-Book World

Pew Study Suggests Libraries (And Print) Still Have A Future In An E-Book World | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it
A new study from the Pew Internet and American Life Project looks at the future of libraries.

 

The study, titled “Library services in the digital age,” doesn’t include anything particularly shocking or revelatory, but it suggests that many people still value the role of libraries, and that librarians are thinking about how their services can evolve.

 

The new survey finds that many library patrons are eager to see libraries’ digital services expand, yet also feel that print books remain important in the digital age.

 

It also explores the changing world of library services by exploring the activities at libraries that are already in transition and the kinds of services citizens would like to see if they could redesign libraries themselves. It is part of a larger research effort by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project that is exploring the role libraries play in people’s lives and in their communities. The research is underwritten by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

Read the full study here: http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/Library-services/

 

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Academic Librarian Research: A Survey of Attitudes, Involvement, and Perceived Capabilities

Academic Librarian Research: A Survey of Attitudes, Involvement, and Perceived Capabilities | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

One of the interesting articles in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries (September 2012) is this article on the development and results of a recent survey of academic librarians about their attitudes, involvement, and perceived capabilities using and engaging in primary research. The purpose of the survey was to inform the development of a continuing education program in research design.

 

"This article contributes a new perspective on the topic of how librarians think of their own abilities to conduct research with the introduction of a confidence scale and opens a line of inquiry for possible future research activities related to self-efficacy and research productivity..."


"Two other potentially profitable research agendas are identified in this article: defining a research culture in a library setting and performing a systematic review of published academic librarian practitioner-researchers to learn how to replicate their success."

 

The article (as well as all the articles in this issue) are available for download in pdf and html here: http://crl.acrl.org/content/73/5/431.full.pdf+html

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Survey Findings from UK Reveal Librarians Second Only to Doctors in Public’s Trust | LJ INFOdocket

Survey Findings from UK Reveal Librarians Second Only to Doctors in Public’s Trust | LJ INFOdocket | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

Internet users trust library staff more than most other providers of online support and information, and public library staff are second only to doctors in terms of the trust placed in them by seekers of information, according to an evaluation commissioned by the UK Society of Chief Librarians and supported and funded by Arts Council England.


80% of the users surveyed through the Public Libraries Information Offer said that the support provided in libraries improved their level of understanding of online information and 70% said that it had improved their online knowledge and skills. Users said they would overwhelmingly recommend their public library’s online information to other people.

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Survey Says Library Users Are Your Best Customers

Survey Says Library Users Are Your Best Customers | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

In the Internet age, there’s been no shortage of talk about the future of libraries, and much speculation about where libraries fit in the increasingly digital-rich media market.   This groundbreaking new study shows value of libraries to the book—and the e-book business.

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Bring back shushing librarians

Bring back shushing librarians | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it
Library users plead for quiet places to read, write and study — but is anybody listening?

 

Librarians hate to be depicted as bun- and glasses-wearing shushers, hellbent on silencing any and all noisy activities within their sacred domain. Fair enough: Librarians are highly skilled, well-educated and socially aware as a rule, and should not be reduced to a cultural stereotype.  Nevertheless, there’s a lot to be said for that shushing.

 

A recent survey by the Pew Research Center, “Library Services in the Digital Age,” polled a nationally representative sample of what people really want from their libraries.

 

“Quiet study spaces for adults and children” is considered to be a very important element by 76 percent of the population, only one percentage point less than the value given to computer and Internet access. A relatively silent place to read is almost exactly as valuable to these people as the Internet!

 

Almost nine in ten blacks (89%) and Hispanics (86%) consider libraries’ quiet study spaces to be “very important” to the community, making them significantly more than whites (71%) to say this. Additionally, women (81%) are more likely than men (70%) to consider this resource “very important,” as are Americans who have not graduated from college (78%) compared with college graduates (69%). Adults ages 50-64 are also somewhat more likely than other age groups to consider quiet study spaces “very important,” although Americans under the age of 50 are most likely to consider these areas important overall.

 

Those living in urban areas (81%) are also significantly more likely than those living in suburban (73%) or rural (73%) communities to say quiet study spaces are “very important.”

 

According to the Pew study, quiet matters more to library patrons than special programs for kids or job-search resources or access to fancy databases or classes and events or spaces for public meetings. It matters more to them than the ability to check out e-books or engage in “more interactive learning experiences” — areas that many library experts seem to regard as top priorities for the libraries of the future.  More here:  http://www.salon.com/2013/01/31/bring_back_shushing_librarians/

 

You can read more (and download) about the study here:

http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/part-4-what-people-want-from-their-libraries/

 

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GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, March 23, 2013 4:06 AM

bring back 'shusshing" in libraries!!

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Assessing Campus Libraries

Assessing Campus Libraries | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

Students are satisfied overall with the role academic libraries play in their lives, but more than a third of them do not see the libraries as crucial to their academic success, according to a new survey.

 

The study, conducted by Library Journal, gathered data from 2,516 students at four- and two-year colleges about their opinions and habits in relation to their campus libraries and online library portals.

In many respects libraries fared well.

 

The survey found that more than half (55 percent) of students typically find what they are looking for on a typical visit to either libraries or library portals.

 

“Of notable concern is the decrease in assurance that the academic library helps students understand what is being learned in class and offers unique support,” write the authors of the report, which is not freely available.

 

Read more:  http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/11/30/survey-suggests-students-feel-satisfied-not-escstatic-about-library-services

 

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GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, March 23, 2013 4:13 AM

libraries - best practice, comparative

toddsvec's curator insight, October 12, 6:01 PM

What are the libraries of the future going to look like?  Do we really need them?

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Library Journal survey on etextbook collections in academic libraries

Library Journal survey on etextbook collections in academic libraries | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

Library Journal is conducting a survey about etextbook collections in academic libraries. Participation in this study will help identify the scope of etextbooks on college campuses–how popular they are and who is selecting them. Participation is encouraged even if your library does not currently have an etextbook collection. All participants will be entered into a drawing to win a $100 American Express gift card.  Results from this survey will be revealed in an upcoming issue of Library Journal and some of the results will be shared at the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit on October 17th.

 

Please click on the link below to take a brief survey:  http://fluidsurveys.com/surveys/laura-z/2012-lj-etextbook-survey/

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New survey confirms librarians’ commitment to protecting privacy rights

New survey confirms librarians’ commitment to protecting privacy rights | The Future Librarian | Scoop.it

A new survey measuring librarians' views on privacy rights and protecting library users' privacy, which builds on an earlier 2008 survey assessing librarians' attitudes about privacy, provides important data that will help ALA evaluate the state of privacy in the United States and libraries' role in protecting library users' privacy.

 

The 2012 Survey indicates that librarians remain concerned about privacy and individuals' desire to control access and use of personal information. Ninety-five percent agree or strongly agree that individuals should be able to control who sees their personal information.

 

Nearly 100 percent of respondents agreed that “Libraries should never share personal information, circulation records or Internet use records with third parties unless it has been authorized by the individual or by a court of law,” and 76 percent feel libraries are doing all they can to prevent unauthorized access to individual’s personal information and circulation records. Overall, nearly 80 percent feel libraries should play a role in educating the general public about privacy issues.

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