Communicates the importance of past and present people, days and events in their life, in the lives of family and community members and in other communities. "/>
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Stage 1 HSIE: When the old becomes something new
Educational resources for teachers teaching K-6 HSIE (Stage 1).
Change and continuity (CCS1.1): Technologies, both past and present.
Providing opportunities for children to compare and discover old technologies, how it was "then" and what it is "now".
Communicates the importance of past and present people, days and events in their life, in the lives of family and community members and in other communities.
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Toy Stories | gabriele galimberti

Toy Stories | gabriele galimberti | Stage 1 HSIE: When the old becomes something new | Scoop.it

Explore the concept of 'technologies: both past and present' by relating to students' personal experiences with change and continuity, using their toys. Discover children's favourite toys from around the world whilst having a global perspective.

Bonny Zacharia's insight:

The compilation of pictures of children around the world with their toys is a great resource to introduce the subject matter of ‘change and continuity' and explore the concept of 'technologies; both past and present’ as teachers can engage students with something they are familiar with - toys. In the classroom students can construct a T-Chart of their favourite toys when they were younger and their current favourite toy - 'My toys: Then and Now'. The later Stage 1 students could also be introduced to do a chronological timeline of their toys from when they were a baby until now. This engages their numeracy skills in knowing how to collect, organise and display data about themselves (DS1.1) (NSW BOS, 2002, p.91).

Students can also write a short description of their toys and reasons why they were their favourtie toys at the time. They can then read to the class their descriptions by bringing their toys and old photographs. This activity will encourage students to activate their literacy skill in reading and writing a description exploring verbs, tenses and adjectives (WS1.9) (NSW BOS, 2007, p.36).

 

The students' responses will differ on a personal level, however the teacher can assess student's understanding about past and present through different modes of assessments such as oral presentations and speeches of comparing their favourite toys as well as seeing whether students are able to comprehend the process of change and continuity in their own lives through the simple representation in the T-Chart. 

 

Children and Youth in History; http://chnm.gmu.edu/cyh/

Additionally, this is a great resource for teachers to look into the history of children and youth over time, especially challenging the idea of childhood, and how that has changed over time. Teachers can introduce this idea that every child is different all over the world, and just like them, as they get older, they too will find new interests and discoveries. 

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Reference:

Board of Studies, NSW. (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2007). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

McIntosh, J. & New South Wales. Multicultural Education Centre. (1984). Taking stock : assessing teaching-learning materials for cultural bias -- some guidelines and strategies. N.S.W. Dept. of Education, Directorate of Special Programs, Multicultural Education Centre, Sydney.

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Australian Indigenous tools and technology - australia.gov.au

Australian Indigenous tools and technology - australia.gov.au | Stage 1 HSIE: When the old becomes something new | Scoop.it

Discover traditional Aboriginal technology in different communities as well as gain an Indigenous perspective of how Australian Aboriginal use technology in the modern world. 

Bonny Zacharia's insight:

This resource is provided by the government of Australia can be useful to traditional Aboriginal technology regarding the use of message sticks for communication, canoes as transport and weapons such as spears and boomerangs. Teacher can discuss what students think of technology, "Is it all about computers?" "What technology do they use at home?" Sequentially, after reviewing some of the traditional Aboriginal hunting technology, teachers can construct a classroom mindmap, prompt and assess student’s understanding by asking "What were the traditional hunting tools used?" "How was food obtained?" As a follow up activity, students can make their own boomerangs and present to the class what boomerangs are used for and how it works. To further their understanding ask "What kinds of technology Aboriginal people today?” These community websites work hand in hand with the government resource regarding the subject matter of 'change and continuity'. It provides a holistic approach tackling the view of Aboriginal people as the "other" and challenges the stereotypical idea that “one culture is considered as the ideal and all the other cultures are judged in relation to it” (McIntosh, 1984, p.8). 

- Tobwabba Arts http://www.tobwabba.com.au/ :

(online store offering a collection of original works of Aboriginal artists; i.e paintings, ceramics, clothing).

- Bush Mechanics http://www.bushmechanics.com/home.htm :

(the ingenuity of the Indigenous mechanics - students can also listen to an audio recording of an Aboriginal person of how technology has progressed throughout time, in regards motorcars and mechanics).

 

Hence, teachers are to be inclusive regarding Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and comprehend that “the role of the hidden curriculum in schools needs to be acknowledged to ensure Indigenous knowledge is not trivialised” (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 392). Use the resources with care and acknowledge contributions being aware of the historical context and the different community groups. Perhaps teachers may consult with the Aboriginal support staff to organise an incursion of an Aboriginal elder to share the history of Indigenous Australians in their community (CCS1.2) representing an Aboriginal perspective on technology.

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Reference:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

McIntosh, J. & New South Wales. Multicultural Education Centre. (1984). Taking stock : assessing teaching-learning materials for cultural bias -- some guidelines and strategies. N.S.W. Dept. of Education, Directorate of Special Programs, Multicultural Education Centre, Sydney.

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Hornsby Shire Historical Society Museum

Hornsby Shire Historical Society Museum | Stage 1 HSIE: When the old becomes something new | Scoop.it

“What was life like for your great-grandparents living in Australia? What games did they play? How did their mothers cook and wash? Did they shop at…”

Bonny Zacharia's insight:

This is an excursion idea for teachers to bring students as an excursion. Students engage in participatory learning as they are immersed into the world of the 1930s. A visit to the museum a very valuable experience for students as they explore "living in the past and find things to excite them" (Yılmaz, 2007, in Doğan, 2010, p.145) such as different clothing, school systems, households and entertainment. Through this experience, students learn about the different cultural values and customs from the past and realise that 'change and continuity' is inevitable within the society that they live in. 

 

Following the excursion to the museum, teachers can use the experience to engage students to identify and classify the differences between the 1930s and the present era by constructing a table and pictorial evidences. As a follow up activity they can do a personal recount of their their favourite object or experience in this museum, expressing how they felt as they participate in the activities foreign to them. As a Creative Arts link, students use their literacy skills to do an enactment living in the 1930s – how they would walk and talk, what they wear and displaying unique individual traits. Also doing a 'role walk' (Ewing & Simons, 2004, p. 75) to help think about a particular person who would live in the 1930s, what they will be doing in this context. The teacher tap into different characters to unfreeze them, by asking quetions such as where they are going, what they are wearing and why they are walking like this. 

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Reference:

Doğan, Y. (2010). Primary school student’s benefiting from museums with educational purposes. International Journal of Social

Inguiry, 3(2), 137-164.

 

Ewing, R & Simons, J. (2004). Beyond the Script Take 2: Drama in the Classroom. (Vol. 1), Newtown NSW: Primary English Teaching Association.

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Who are the families of the world | Global Education

Who are the families of the world | Global Education | Stage 1 HSIE: When the old becomes something new | Scoop.it

Encourage children to gain a global perspective by exploring the lives of children around the world, including the games they played and jobs they had to do. Create an awareness of the reality of the world by challenging their perspectives and see the advancement of technology in Australia in comparison to the third world or developing countries.

Bonny Zacharia's insight:

This website provides teachers with ample teaching resources across the curriculum and stages in regards to different global issues. As a standard for an 'authentic pedagogy', this resource will aid teachers to provide meaningful classroom experiences for students, to promote a sense of "connectedness to the world" (Newmann and Wehlage, 1993, cited in Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 143). This involves exploring real world issues and allowing students to relate to the issues with their personal experiences through having substantive class discussions as well as within peer groups.

 

After viewing "A Day in the Life of Lucy film clip" students are able to engage with a personal testimony of Lucy living in Uganda, covering themes of family, chores, transport and home. Addressing literacy outcomes, students develop identifying and classifying skills, as they gather meaning from images, stories and videos. Have a class discussion with teachers prompting questions such as, Lucy had to 'fetch water for cooking and drinking', what do we do at home to get water to cook and drink? Instead of 'bicycles to carry the load', what do we use to carry heavy loads to different places? http://www.worldvision.com.au/Learn/SchoolResources/Content.aspx?id=a7ae2556-76de-468d-a073-8d8eb1808dc7&

Additionally, students also create a piece of writing about their own testimonies regarding their way of life. 

 

To extend their global perspectives on technology, students can also learn about the different farming technologies used around the world such as what farmers use in South East Asia differ from what Australian farmers use. Teachers can use this image to compare the different technologies used as well as comparing the advancement of technology in Australia in comparison to a developing country. 'Rice growing in Indonesia' :

http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/107.3_GI_Foodsecurity_TractorSekong.jpg

and Rice growing in Australia 

http://www.aboutrice.com/facts/fact04.html

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Reference:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Old School

Old School | Stage 1 HSIE: When the old becomes something new | Scoop.it
Have you ever wondered what school was like in the olden days? How different the classrooms, teachers and lessons were...and what the punishment was if you were bad?
Bonny Zacharia's insight:

Teachers can use this video to engage students in thinking about the subject matter of change and continuity within the Stage 1 HSIE syllabus, especially in terms of the school setting, of how the education system differs in the 19th Century and now. Prior to watching the clip, brainstorm student's views on what they think schools in the olden days are like, what do we have now that are not used in their schools, what sort of technologies were used back then and now in schools. This can act as an assessment tool for teachers to gather student's prior knowledge and understanding. 

 

Through this video, teachers may also organise a class excursion to the Rouse Hill House and Farm and experience the olden day schooling. This online resource also provides learning resources for Stage 1 students learning HSIE. 

http://www.hht.net.au/education/browse_by_stage?queries_stage_query=Stage+1

 

As a follow up activity, teachers can engage students in a class discussion with similar questions such as how would you feel if you went to the olden schools like in the video and what are used then and not anymore in today’s classroom. A group presentation in speech and making a poster to reflect what they have seen will also be beneficial as students engage in reflective discussion linking back to the source and working collaboratively with peers to gather their arguments. Scaffolding is crucial to guide students in their zone of proximal development with an appropriate level of difficulty to the task (McInerney and McInerney, 2010, p.54), this includes breaking the tasks into smaller goals for students to achieve step by step.

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Reference: 

McInerney, D. & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson Education Australia.

 

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