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Fiendish wheat genome reveals grain's history

Fiendish wheat genome reveals grain's history | Wheat | Scoop.it

A draft genome sequence of wheat promises to speed efforts to breed new types of one of the world’s most important crops — and to reveal the tangled genomic history of an ancient staple. In a suite of papers published today in Science1–4, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium has unveiled initial portraits of the genome from Triticum aestivum, better known as bread wheat.


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Wheat Study Shows How Climate Change will lead to Low-Quality Food

Wheat Study Shows How Climate Change will lead to Low-Quality Food | Wheat | Scoop.it
A new study on wheat has shown that rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide will prevent plants from making proteins.

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Wheat evaluated for cereal cyst nematode - Capital Press

Wheat evaluated for cereal cyst nematode - Capital Press | Wheat | Scoop.it
Wheat evaluated for cereal cyst nematode
Capital Press
ANTHONY, Idaho — Researchers involved in a long-running evaluation of Pacific Northwest wheat varieties have made recommendations for growers coping with cereal cyst nematode infestations.
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Climate change will reduce crop yields sooner than we thought - University of Leeds

Climate change will reduce crop yields sooner than we thought - University of Leeds | Wheat | Scoop.it

A study led by the University of Leeds has shown that global warming of only 2°C will be detrimental to crops in temperate and tropical regions, with reduced yields from the 2030s onwards.

 

Professor Andy Challinor, from the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds and lead author of the study, said: “Our research shows that crop yields will be negatively affected by climate change much earlier than expected.

“Furthermore, the impact of climate change on crops will vary both from year-to-year and from place-to-place – with the variability becoming greater as the weather becomes increasingly erratic.”


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Growing use of drones poised to transform agriculture

Growing use of drones poised to transform agriculture | Wheat | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON --Drones are quickly moving from the battlefield to the farmer's field -- on the verge of helping farmers oversee millions of acres throughout rural America and save them big money in the process.

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U.S. wheat threatened by Arctic cold, dryness

U.S. wheat threatened by Arctic cold, dryness | Wheat | Scoop.it

CHICAGO, Jan 3 (Reuters) - Bitter cold temperatures across the U.S. Plains early next week will put some of the dormant hard red winter wheat crop at risk of damage, particularly in drier areas of the region, meteorologists and agronomists said on Friday.


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Marco Antonio Gonzalez's curator insight, January 7, 2014 4:28 AM

Wheat threatend by Atic cold, correction of forecast

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Agrokultura defends rapeseed in Ukraine portfolio

Agrokultura defends rapeseed in Ukraine portfolio | Wheat | Scoop.it

Agrokultura defended rapeseed, which has a patchy record in Ukraine, among its crop portfolio as the former Soviet Union farm operator revealed a jump to nearly 500,000 tonnes in its overall harvest this year.

The group said that, with 2,300 hectares to go out of a total of approaching 130,000 hectares, it had harvested 470,000 tonnes of grains, oilseeds and sugar beet, up 20% year on year.

The rise came despite some disappointment in in Ukraine where the group's grain yields, while above the national average, had risen by less than Agrokultura had hoped.

"We had targeted higher yields for Ukrainian grains, and we are making the relevant changes to input programmes and operating techniques to improve performance," said Stephen Pickup, who was promoted last month to the group's managing director from finance director.

The Agrokultura winter wheat yield rose just 2% to 3.8 tonnes per hectare, and the winter barley result by 12% to 3.7 tonnes per hectare, compared with a 27% rebound in the national result for grains overall, according to Ukraine farm ministry data.

'Well suited'

However, Agrokultura said that its winter rapeseed yield had soared 33% to 2.9 tonnes per hectare in Ukraine.

"Rapeseed has again shown it is well suited to western Ukraine with excellent yields which improved materially over 2012," Mr Pickup said.

The oilseed has a somewhat mixed performance in the country, with hail damage, pests and, in particular, cold winters reducing its popularity in many areas, and putting a stop to a run-up in area, on a harvested basis, from 54,000 hectares in 2003 to 1.38m hectares five years later, on US Department of Agriculture data.

That has fallen back to some 1.0m hectares this year, on USDA estimates.

Landkom lesson

Indeed, Landkom International, which Agrokultura acquired last year, and where Mr Pickup previously worked, had a difficult experience with the oilseed.

A disappointing crop in 2011, when the yield came in at 1.75 tonnes per hectare left Landkom unable to meet sales commitments, and prompted the group to warn on profits and reveal it was "now reviewing strategic options", which led to the takeover by  Agrokultura.

Agrokultura has this year been revamping its land portfolio with a focus on western Ukraine, where it says the climate is less volatile than eastern areas.

Russia results

In Russia's black earth region, where Agrokultura has harvested 69,100 hectares so far, with the 2,300 hectares outstanding, the group achieved "significant yield improvements", Mr Pickup said.

This year's crops "have benefited from the good weather conditions in Russia for most of the season although rain in the harvest time has delayed completion".

Yields were, in fact, a higher in Russia for corn and sunflowers than in Ukraine but, at 3.6 tonnes per hectare, a little lower for winter wheat.

Agrokultura shares, which are listed in Stockholm, rose 0.4% to SKE2.46 in morning deals.


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MPMI: A Bacterial Type III Secretion Assay for Delivery of Fungal Effector Proteins into Wheat (2013)

MPMI: A Bacterial Type III Secretion Assay for Delivery of Fungal Effector Proteins into Wheat (2013) | Wheat | Scoop.it

Large numbers of candidate effectors from fungal pathogens are being identified through whole genome sequencing and in planta expression studies. AlthoughAgrobacterium-mediated transient expression has enabled high-throughput functional analysis of effectors in dicot plants, this assay is not effective in cereal leaves. Here we show that a non-pathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens(Pf) engineered to express the T3SS of Pseudomonas syringae and the wheat pathogen Xanthomonas translucens (Xt) deliver fusion proteins containing T3SS signals from P. syringae (AvrRpm1) and X. campestris (AvrBs2) Avr proteins, respectively, into wheat leaf cells. A calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (Cya) reporter protein was delivered effectively into wheat and barley by both bacteria. Absence of any disease symptoms with Pf, makes it more suitable than Xt) for detecting hypersensitive cell death (HR) induced by effector protein with avirulence activity. We further modified the delivery system by removal of the myristoylation site from the AvrRpm1 fusion to prevent its localisation to the PM which could inhibit recognition of an Avr protein. Delivery of the flax rust AvrM protein by the modified delivery system into transgenic tobacco leaves expressing the corresponding M resistance protein induced a strong HR indicating that the system is capable of delivering a functional rust Avr protein. In a preliminary screen of effectors from the stem rust fungus Puccinia graminisf. sp. tritici, we identified one effector that induced a host genotype-specific HR in wheat. Thus the modified AvrRpm1:effector/Pf system is an effective tool for large scale screening of pathogen effectors for recognition in wheat.


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245732's curator insight, November 19, 2013 11:53 AM

Another cool article I think. I find all walks of life interesting, even microbial plant diseases. I believe that studying these and how they work is always cool.

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AgriNews: Study Temperatures to go off the charts around 2047

AgriNews: Study Temperatures to go off the charts around 2047 | Wheat | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON (AP) — Starting in about a decade, Kingston, Jamaica, probably will be off-the-charts hot — permanently. Other places soon will follow.

Singapore in 2028. Mexico City in 2031. Cairo in 2036. Phoenix and Honolulu in 2043.

And, eventually, the whole world in 2047.

A new study on global warming pinpoints the probable dates for when cities and ecosystems around the world will regularly experience hotter environments the likes of which they never have seen before.

And for dozens of cities, mostly in the tropics, those dates are a generation or less away.

“This paper is both innovative and sobering,” said Oregon State University professor Jane Lubchenco, former head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, who was not involved in the study.

 


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US/Mexico: K-State to lead effort to develop climate-resilient wheat

US/Mexico: K-State to lead effort to develop climate-resilient wheat | Wheat | Scoop.it
Kansas State University has been chosen to lead a new effort focused on developing wheat varieties that are resilient to the warming effects of climate change.

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U.S. Farmers Major Beneficiaries of China's Ag Import Boom

U.S. Farmers Major Beneficiaries of China's Ag Import Boom | Wheat | Scoop.it

Agricultural Economy

Fred Gale indicated in recent update at the USDA’s Economic Research Service Amber Waves webpage (“U.S. Exports Surge as China Supports Agricultural Prices“) that, “U.S. farmers have been major beneficiaries of a Chinese agricultural import boom that coincided with the growth in Chinese agricultural support. China is now the leading destination for U.S. agricultural exports (up from seventh in the early 2000s).

“U.S. agricultural exports to China totaled $5 billion in 2003–the year before China began its direct subsidy payments. By 2012, U.S. sales of agricultural commodities to China had risen more than fivefold to nearly $26 billion per year. China now accounts for 18 percent of U.S. agricultural export sales, up from 8 to 9 percent during 2003-07″ [see related graph].

And a recent update from University of Nebraska Extension pointed out that, “Concomitant with China’s phenomenal economic growth is the livestock revolution, a demand-driven increase in meat consumption worldwide. Until the mid- nineties, the amount of meat consumed in developing countries grew three times as fast as compared to developed countries, lending support to Bennett’s Law (Pinstrup-Andersen, Pandya-Lorch and Rosegrant, 1999). Bennett’s Law states that if a country is developing, household income rises, and therefore consumption of starchy staples decreases. Conversely, there is an increase in the consumption of animal-products such as dairy or meat” [see related graph].

 

In a more detailed article trade issues, Doug Palmer reported yesterday at Politico that, “President Barack Obama was often criticized in his first term for moving too slowly on trade, but now his chief negotiator is pressing Congress to pick up the pace as the White House pushes to conclude a landmark trade deal in the Asia-Pacific by the end of the year.

“‘We think it would be good to get TPA [trade promotion authority] as soon as possible with as broad bipartisan support as possible,’ U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman told POLITICO in an exclusive interview this week.

“That legislation, also known as ‘fast track,’ would allow Obama to submit trade agreements to Congress for straight up-and-down votes without any amendments, giving other countries confidence that any deal they reach with the White House wouldn’t be picked apart by U.S. lawmakers unhappy with one provision or another.”

Meanwhile, University of Illinois Agricultural Economist Scott Irwin penned an update yesterday at the farmdocDaily blog titled, “Biodiesel Supply, Demand, and RINs Pricing.”

And an update yesterday at the National Drought Mitigation Center Online stated that, “Rain whittled away at the remnants of long-term drought in the Plains in the week that ended Oct. 22, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor map.  The only areas that got worse were in Texas, Oklahoma, Hawaii and Long Island.

“The proportion of the contiguous 48 states in moderate drought or worse fell to 35 percent from 36.71 percent a week earlier, down from a late-summer (Sept. 10) peak of 50.69 percent, noted Brad Rippey, meteorologist in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Office of the Chief Economist. Thirty-five percent represents the smallest U.S. drought area since May 15, 2012.”

In other news, Neil Munshi reported yesterday at The Financial Times Online that, “Thousands of US farmers will take to their fields this month for the main annual harvest on tractors equipped with cutting edge technology, as agricultural equipment makers increasingly incorporate elements of data analytics, GPS and remote sensing in a race to make farming more precise.

“At a time when carmakers are targeting 2020 for the first self-driving cars, a tractor that maps a field, drives itself and precisely calibrates its movements within inches to minimise wasted fuel, fertiliser or seed, is already almost standard.”

The FT article pointed out that, “Mark Rosegrant, of the International Food Policy Research Institute, estimates that the rigorous adoption of ‘precision agriculture’ technology could increase yield on any given farm by about 10 per cent, compared with average global annual crop yield increases of about 1 per cent.”

Also, Mark Peters reported in today’s Wall Street Journal that, “An analysis by the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire found 1,135 U.S. counties had more deaths than births last year, a nearly 30% increase from 2009. The number was the highest on record, with deaths outpacing births in nearly half of all nonmetropolitan counties.

“Kansas officials are trying to attract more residents and businesses to rural areas where population losses have been the steepest. But past efforts such as land giveaways in the Great Plains have struggled in the face of larger demographic forces.”

The article added that, “The Center for Economic Development and Business Research at Wichita State University forecasts through its model steady population declines in western Kansas for decades to come, with Greeley County predicted to be less than half its current size in 25 years. And while unemployment rates are low in the region, many counties lack the job growth needed to attract new residents, limiting the effectiveness of incentive programs, said Jeremy Hill, director of the center.”

Immigration

Michael D. Shear reported in today’s New York Times that, “President Obama on Thursday renewed his call for an immigration overhaul, telling an audience of activists at the White House that the fate of a bipartisan Senate bill now rests with Republicans in the House.

“‘Anyone still standing in the way of this bipartisan reform should at least explain why,’ Mr. Obama said to repeated applause in the East Room. ‘If House Republicans have new and different additional ideas for how we should move forward, then we should hear them. I will be listening.’

“The Senate passed legislation in June by a vote of 68-32, giving a lift to Mr. Obama’s plans to improve border security, require employers to verify the immigration status of their workers, and provide a path to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants. White House strategists hoped that the vote would prompt action in the House, where Republicans had resisted similar calls for an overhaul of the system.”

Bloomberg writers Jim Efstathiou Jr. and Marvin G. Perez reported yesterday that, “U.S. fruit and vegetable growers say delays in processing visa applications during the government shutdown has left them so short of immigrant workers that crops may be lost if the process isn’t expedited.

“The 16-day shutdown that ended Oct. 17 has delayed the arrival of temporary workers needed to harvest Florida’s citrus crop, Mike Carlton, director of labor relations for the Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association, said.”

Farm Bill- Policy Issues

David Rogers reported yesterday at Politico that, “When the farm bill conference meets Wednesday afternoon, it will be on a grand stage: the gilded Ways and Means Committee meeting room in Longworth with its sculpted eagles and history of past bargains.

“The challenge for negotiators is to think as big and bold.

“The Agriculture Committees argue–somewhat defensively– that they have already taken major steps. Both bills end the current system of direct cash payments to producers–costing about $4.5 billion annually. At the same time, organic and specialty crops gain modest ground. Much tighter payment limits are imposed on future subsidies. More of an effort is made to help only producers who have put seed in the ground, put themselves at risk and experienced a loss.”

Mr. Rogers noted that, “What that ‘loss’ entails is still debated. The Senate’s ’shallow loss’ revenue protection program could end up distributing taxpayer funds to corn and soybean producers who are already making a profit. At the same time, critics would say the House goes off the deep end with a heavily subsidized supplemental coverage option– with only a 10 percent deductible.

“The next few days could be pivotal as the Senate responds to new options outlined by the House. Time is running short, and given the erratic legislative schedule this fall, neither side can afford to allow matters to drift.

“Most importantly, perhaps, the hide-bound commodity lobbies are under pressure to show more flexibility themselves. Fair or unfair, the disconnect surrounding the farm bill is real. And farm-bill advocates admit that new approaches are needed to expand their base of support in Congress.”

The lengthy and broad-based Politico article also indicated that, “‘The farm bill and the American consumer, it’s kind of like a bunch of high school kids,’ [House Ag Committee Chairman Frank Lucas (R., Okla.)] told POLITICO. ‘As long as the car’s out front, it’s full of gas, the insurance is paid, and you have the keys, the kids take it for granted.’

“‘I think my colleagues and the folks out in the countryside take it for granted that agriculture is always going to be there, it’s going to work. That said, somebody has to put gas in that car. Somebody has to buy that insurance. Somebody has to pass a farm bill. Somebody has to create a safety net.’

“‘We may not get the respect but nonetheless we’re still the defense between every consumer on this planet and hunger.’”

Meanwhile, Rep. Rodney Davis (R., Il.) discussed Farm Bill issues yesterday in an interview on WDWS radio (Champaign, Il.).  Rep. Davis is serving on the Farm Bill conference committee; a portion of his remarks from yesterday’s discussion can be heard here (MP3- 2:30).

In part, Rep. Davis noted that, “I think we in this country have a decision to make.  We can either pass a Farm Bill and create a long-term plan and give our agricultural producers and our family farmers the certainty they need; or, we can just get out of the farm program and become a food importer rather than a food exporter…”

Also, Nathaniel Shuda reported this week at the Wisconsin Rapids Tribune Online that, “In preparation for talks next week on the federal farm bill, Wisconsin’s junior senator made a stop Wednesday in south Wood County to learn more about the state’s largest fruit crop.

“U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin toured Fanning Cranberry Co. in Seneca, where she got the chance to experience firsthand what industry leaders are saying is one of the largest fall crops on record, followed by a tour of the Ocean Spray Cranberries processing plant in Wisconsin Rapids. It was Baldwin’s first publicized visit to the Wisconsin Rapids area since being elected last year to succeed retiring Sen. Herb Kohl.”

A news release yesterday from Sen. Kay Hagan (D., N.C.) stated that, “[Sen. Hagain] is leading a bipartisan group of 12 Senators in urging the Senate Agriculture Committee to include a provision in the 2013 Farm Bill that eliminates a duplicative Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulation on pesticides. A copy of the letter to Agriculture Committee Chair Debbie Stabenow and Ranking Member Cochran is available here.

“‘This redundant regulation creates unnecessary liability and paperwork burdens on farmers, state and local governments, public health officials and small businesses,’ Hagan said. ‘This is not about whether pesticides should be regulated, but rather it is about eliminating an unnecessary and duplicative regulation that wastes taxpayer dollars and provides little to no environmental or public health benefits. Agriculture is our state’s largest industry, and we need to be breaking down barriers that keep farmers from growing jobs, not adding more paperwork. I am hopeful that Agriculture Committee leaders in both the Senate and the House will remove this burdensome requirement in the final 2013 Farm Bill.’”

Andrea J. Cook reported yesterday at the Rapid City Journal (S.D.) Online that, “Three weeks after a blizzard killed thousands of cattle in western South Dakota, nearly 50 ranchers told Sen. John Thune about the problems confronting them while asking about the farm bill’s future at a Wednesday meeting in Hermosa.”

The article noted that, “Several ranchers encouraged Thune to support an increase the $100,000 payment cap for the Livestock Indemnity Program because their losses will far exceed that cap.”

And Dave Gallagher reported recently at The News Tribune (Tacoma, Wash.) Online that, “As Congress gets back to the business of passing legislation, several local farmers are hopeful that a proposed farm bill is one that will offer a long-term solution for research in specialty crops.

“U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., toured BelleWood Acres on Tuesday, Oct. 23, an event that included a discussion about the farm bill and about specialty crop research. The bill expired Sept. 30 and Cantwell said a new bill needs to be passed by the end of the year to ensure that block grants for specialty crops are not put in jeopardy.”

With respect to the executive branch, in remarks delivered yesterday at the Center for American Progress, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew indicated that, “As we move forward, we should make a pro-jobs, pro-growth agenda our focus. And we can advance this agenda by taking bipartisan action to replace sequestration, fix our broken immigration system, and pass a farm bill.”

Sec. Lew added that, “Another bipartisan bill that can strengthen our economy is the farm bill. Bipartisan legislation that has already passed the Senate is designed to protect America’s farmers and ranchers and provide a safety net for America’s most vulnerable children. The farm bill conferees have an opportunity to work together to develop a bipartisan package that promotes economic growth and job creation while protecting the most vulnerable. It is time to get a bipartisan farm bill signed into law.”

Also yesterday at a news briefing, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney indicated that, “We’re focused on, you know, making progress with Congress and addressing the very important issues that the American people care about and want us to address here in Washington, including growing the economy, creating jobs, passing comprehensive immigration reform, passing a farm bill which is so vitally important to rural areas of this country. That’s what we’re working on.”

A news release yesterday from the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives (NCFC) noted yesterday that, “The [NCFC] today sent a letter to the leaders of the House and Senate conference committee on the farm bill outlining the top recommendations of America’s farmer-owned businesses in the legislation.

“‘Of primary importance, the farm bill must preserve the long-standing rural-urban alliance that reinforces the fact that food security, investment in rural America and a safety net for those in need are priorities benefitting the entire nation,’ the letter states.”

A recent update at the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) Online stated that, “NAWG wrote House and Senate agriculture leaders and farm bill conferees this week to stress wheat growers’ priorities going into the official conference process. The letter urged conferees to maintain a strong federal crop insurance system and explicitly opposed provisions in the Senate-passed bill to link conservation compliance requirements or apply means testing to the insurance program. NAWG supports establishing farm-level protection within Title I and urged committee members to ensure that any reference price does not distort the market or impact planting decisions.”

An update yesterday at the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition Blog stated that, “As House and Senate farm bill conferees prepare for their first official public meeting next Wednesday, a group of bipartisan Representatives and Senators delivered two ‘Dear Colleague’ letters to House [letter here] and Senate leadership [letter here] earlier today.

“Thanks to the leadership of Representatives Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE), Chris Gibson (R-NY), and Chris Collins (R-NY) in the House and Senator Al Franken (D-MN) in the Senate, dozens of members of Congress have joined together to call for a farm bill that invests in the next generation of farmers and breaks down barriers that many new farmers face when starting out.”

In developments on the crop insurance program, a news release yesterday from USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) stated that, “Agriculture Secretary Vilsack today announced that the [USDA's] Risk Management Agency will support crop insurance education and outreach in 45 states to ensure that small and underserved producers get the information they need to effectively manage risk and ensure their businesses are productive and competitive. Cooperative agreements totaling nearly $10 million from two RMA programs– The Targeted States Program and The Risk Management Education Partnership Program–will support thousands of American farmers, ranchers, and producers during a successful yet challenging period for American agriculture.”

In more specific Farm Bill program developments, Alexandra Wexler reported yesterday at The Wall Street Journal Online that, “U.S. sugar processors defaulted on more than half of the outstanding federal loans that came due at the end of last month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Thursday.

“The defaults bring the total cost of the U.S. sugar program, a complex collection of loans and import restrictions that guarantee a minimum price to processors, to about $325.2 million this year, including defaults on loans that came due in August.”

Ms. Wexler noted that, “Good weather and a surge in Mexican imports have boosted domestic sugar supplies this season, weighing on prices, which have tumbled about 50% over the last two years.”

Also this week, the Dallas Morning News editorial board indicated that, “It’s the food stamps piece that has gummed things up. The House voted last month to cut $40 billion over 10 years from food stamp spending. The Senate prefers a $4.5 billion reduction over the next decade.

“The Senate has it right. Undoubtedly, there are ways to wrangle savings out of the food stamp budget, which has doubled since the economy tanked in 2007. The number of recipients has jumped from 26 million in 2007 to 47 million in 2012.

“But taking $40 billion out of food stamps, known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, would hammer deserving families. The Congressional Budget Office reports that most beneficiaries are children, the disabled or those over 60 years of age.”

An update yesterday at the USDA’s Economic Research Service Chart Gallery webpage stated that, “Children accounted for 45 percent of SNAP participants in 2011.”

In other policy related news, Bloomberg writer Alison Vekshin reported yesterday that, “Monsanto Co. and DuPont Co., among the biggest makers of bioengineered crop seeds, are persuading Washington state voters to change their minds about a proposal to require labels on genetically modified food.

“The companies are backing an anti-labeling campaign with $18.1 million – twice that of advocates for a ballot measure next month. The labeling proposal had a 45 percentage-point lead among registered voters five weeks ago that has narrowed to 4 points since opponents began advertising, the independent Elway Poll showed Oct. 21.”

Budget

Kevin Cirilli reported yesterday at Politico that, “Treasury Secretary Jack Lew said on Thursday that Congress should replace the across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration with ‘commonsense’ spending reductions while a broader budget deal is considered.

“Lew said sequestration is weighing on the economy and needs to be addressed.”

And David Rogers reported yesterday at Politico that, “House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan said Thursday he is encouraged by his early talks with Senate Democrats and hopes the two parties can skip past ‘grand bargains’ and focus on ‘achievable’ goals such as substituting entitlement reforms for sequestration cuts this winter.”

- See more at: http://agfax.com/2013/10/25/keith-good-u-s-farmers-major-beneficiaries-chinas-ag-import-boom/#sthash.b4ADsZPO.dpuf


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World wheat crop could hit record levels

World wheat crop could hit record levels | Wheat | Scoop.it
At this early stage in the marketing year, it is unknown how overall supply factors will turn out and influence the wheat market.

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From bushel to bread: How Canada’s wheat feeds the world

From bushel to bread: How Canada’s wheat feeds the world | Wheat | Scoop.it
The Globe and Mail plans to spend the next few months following a bushel of hard red spring wheat grown in Alberta until it is turned into bread by a foreign buyer

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Winter wheat variety selection tool helps production - Tri-State Neighbor

Winter wheat variety selection tool helps production - Tri-State Neighbor | Wheat | Scoop.it
Winter wheat variety selection tool helps production
Tri-State Neighbor
Variety selection is one of the important decisions any crop producer makes, and one that is critical for successful winter wheat production.
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Key to feeding the future may be found in wheat's distant relatives ...

Key to feeding the future may be found in wheat's distant relatives ... | Wheat | Scoop.it
By Meghan Eldridge CIUDAD OBREGON, Mexico — The perfect variety of wheat for a particular environment may be a combination of genes from the past and present. The Wheat Improvement Strategic Programme began in ...
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Midwest soil not recovered from drought

Midwest soil not recovered from drought | Wheat | Scoop.it
A University of Missouri researcher says that soil in the Midwest has not recovered from the recent two-year drought despite significant precipitation this winter. Randal Miles, an associate professor of soil science at the MU School of Natural Resources, says the inadequate soil is hurting farmers.“The soil in Missouri is still dry about 4 to 5 feet down where crop roots live,” says Miles. “This is an improvement from a year ago when two years of drought left many prime growing areas bone dry down to almost 6 feet. However, without enough moisture and nutrients, crops will produce poor yields resulting in a loss for farmers.”In order for soil to be suitable for crops, the soil moisture must recharge. This is a process where water from rain and snow moves downward from the surface and fills in the spaces found in soil. A soil moisture recharge normally comes from snowmelt and rainfall in winter and early spring.“Much of the moisture this winter was slightly below normal with enough running into the streams and rivers and little soaking into the earth,” says Miles. “Missouri needed a long-term drizzly type of rain or snow to replenish the soil for it to have enough residual moisture available for use at planting and harvest, but most of the precipitation this winter came in heavy doses.”Miles says even with heavy amounts of snow and rainfall, moisture near the surface can evaporate with just a few days of high winds, higher-than-normal temperatures, low relative humidity, or a combination of the three. This prevents moisture from having a chance to move deep into the soil where it is needed.“People think that the problem is solved if we get a few good rains or some significant snowfall,” adds Miles. “We’ll need extraordinarily persistent rains for the moisture to get down 5 feet where the roots of mature plants live. It could take weeks or months for water entering the soil surface to move into the 3- to 5-foot depth.”Miles says that it could take another year of solid rain and snowfall for the soil to get back to normal moisture levels.

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Wheat Breeder Cimmyt Works on Heat-Tolerant Crop for South Asia

Wheat Breeder Cimmyt Works on Heat-Tolerant Crop for South Asia | Wheat | Scoop.it
Grain breeder Cimmyt will use genetic mapping to develop heat-tolerant wheat for South Asia, in a project funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture aimed at boosting the crop’s resilience to climate change.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 21, 2014 8:42 PM

This article I find to be both good and bad.  Good because people are developing crops that will  be heartier as the climate changes, bad because it makes it seem like we are adjusting the crops to fit the temperature instead of trying to fix the temperature to better suit the crops we already have.  I see the good, I see that we have accepted climate change as reality and need to find a way for food to be able to still grow in the amounts that are needed to feed the seven billion people on this Earth.  Having the capability to genetically modify wheat so it can continue to grow in areas of south Asia is certainly a plus, without this technology we would be facing in the coming years major wheat shortages around the world, contributing even more to the problem of feeding everyone.  The bad side though, it's nice that we can adapt to the changing temperature but I feel like this is another way to just push global warming to the side.  The 'oh well we can change our food so nothing else matters right now'.  Well what happens when it comes to the point that we can't change our food anymore.  This is beneficial for the time being, people are hungry now and we need to do what we need to do to feed people, but the bigger picture of the fact that Earth's temperature is rising still needs to be in people's minds about how we are going to fix this problem.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:22 PM

With the rise in temperatures and global warming effects, the crops that were thriving in this once rich atmosphere has not been producing what it used to. With the help of genetic engineering, agriculture is now able to grow without limit in these high temperature areas. A staple for crop production in South Asia has been wheat, but one day they discovered it wasn't producing what they expected it to. Witnessing the weather and climate change they began pointing fingers. So to cope with the issue, seeds were modified to become heat-tolerant and in turn make use of the extra energy from the sun to sprout into crops larger than they were before without the expense of lower nutrition 

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Could Wheat Farming Return To West Of The Cascades? - OPB News

Could Wheat Farming Return To West Of The Cascades? - OPB News | Wheat | Scoop.it
Could Wheat Farming Return To West Of The Cascades?
OPB News
When you think of Northwest wheat, you probably picture the rolling golden carpet of Eastern Washington and the vast fields of Eastern Oregon.
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Research Report on China Wheat Industry, 2013-2017

Research Report on China Wheat Industry, 2013-2017 | Wheat | Scoop.it

Wheat is one of major grain varieties around the world, and an important grain crop in China. In 2012, the planting area of wheat in China was 24.139 million hectares, decreasing by 131,000 hectares YOY; the output volume per hectare was 4,995kg, increasing by 158kg YOY; the total output volume of wheat was 120.58 million tons, increasing by 3.18 million tons.


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Why the relationship between water and agriculture needs to change

Why the relationship between water and agriculture needs to change | Wheat | Scoop.it
One-fourth of the world's crops are grown in water-stressed zones. Here's a closer look at the tension between food and water.

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A quarter of global agriculture is grown in water-stressed regions

A quarter of global agriculture is grown in water-stressed regions | Wheat | Scoop.it
The tension between food and water will only intensify, according to a new report

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Black Sea wheat exports to fall as Russian farmers hold back

Wheat exports from the Black Sea countries could be modest in November as Russian farmers withhold crop in expectation of higher prices and as Kazakhstan needs more time to get a clear estimate of the quality of its harvest, traders said.

Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan, which are major global wheat exporters via the Black Sea, ship the main volumes during the first half of the marketing season between July and December.

But they become less competitive in the second half against wheat exporters such as France that sell to North Africa, and Australia, Canada and Germany, which ship to the Middle East.

Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan were expected to boost their combined crop by 36 per cent to 87 million tonnes and exports by 22 per cent to 30 million tonnes during this 2013/14 season, according to the latest Reuters poll in August.

But exports have been curtailed by low stocks, government restocking, and concerns over lack of high-quality wheat.

"Farmers are not selling now as they are anticipating further global price growth," one trader in Moscow said. The bullish view among farmers is supported by rising global prices and delayed winter grain sowing in Russia.

The picture of Russian farmers withholding sales contradicts the usual official view that the sector is burdened with heavy debts and thus there is rush to sell at the start of the season. Holding back from selling wheat, farmers sell sunflower seeds to secure working capital, according to SovEcon.

Russia has already harvested 53.3 million tonnes of wheat by bunker weight from 95.4 per cent of sown area. After cleaning and drying, harvest figures would be about 5 per cent lower, according to the ministry.

It is officially expected to export about 15 million tonnes of wheat in 2013/14, of which 8 million had already been shipped between the start of the season on July 1 to Oct. 10.

"Russia has already exported at least half of its wheat export potential in three and a half months. The slowdown in exports is already there and it is something that is going to continue," Olivier Bouillet, manager of the Kiev office of French grains consultancy Agritel, said.

SovEcon expects October wheat export at 2.1 million tonnes, down from 2.4 million tonnes in September. A trader expects October exports to be below 2 million tonnes and sees it declining further in November and December.

Lower quality in Kazakhstan

Expectation of modest wheat exports from the Black Sea region in November is also supported by dwindling exportable surplus of Ukraine, Romania and lower quality in Kazakhstan.

The Asian country has harvested 20 million tonnes of grains, of which 76.5 per cent was wheat, from 97 per cent of the sown area and expects to get a final estimate of crop volume and quality in November, Nurlan Ospanov, the Board Chairman of Kazakh state grain trader Food Contract Corporation, said.

"The quality of grain is lower, there is more grain of the fourth and the fifth class," Ospanov, whose quotes were passed to Reuters by the corporation, said. "The grain is damp, the harvesting was tough."

Late harvesting will also cause Kazakhstan, Central Asia's largest grain producer, to start main export towards winter, SovEcon said. Its exportable surplus is seen at 9.5 million tonnes of grain and flour, of which 2.2 million tonnes were shipped between July 1 and Oct. 20.


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UK: Researchers tackle weeds, pests and diseases

UK: Researchers tackle weeds, pests and diseases | Wheat | Scoop.it
Chemistry will continue to play a key role in fighting weeds, pests and diseases for years to come, but legislation coupled with new diseases, weeds and pest threats means finding new approaches will become crucial for UK arable farming to remain...

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Genetic research could stem spread of fungus that threatens wheat crops

Genetic research could stem spread of fungus that threatens wheat crops | Wheat | Scoop.it
Scientists have been hard at work in recent years combating a significant disease of wheat. Stem rust is caused by a group of nasty fungal organisms that can infect wheat plants and devastate yields.

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