What's up Health?
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What's up Health?
An up to date overview of what's hot in health innovation
Curated by Valeria Duflot
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Mental Health Hackers | LinkedIn

Mental Health Hackers | LinkedIn | What's up Health? | Scoop.it

I just created a space for patients, caregivers, and professionals interested in MentalHealth. I hope for this group to become a space where people across the spectrum of Mental Health can find a well-meaning community to connect, discuss and collaborate with. Feel free to join in :)

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Why patient-generated health data is critical to the process of care

Why patient-generated health data is critical to the process of care | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
While some providers fear the volume of data generated by patients outside of office visits, others are demonstrating how it can be integrated into clinical workflow through tools like Apple HealthKit and integration companies like Validic.
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Startup gets $7M Series A, GE partnership to apply machine learning to medical imaging

Startup gets $7M Series A, GE partnership to apply machine learning to medical imaging | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
A lot of money and energy is being invested in improving upon and supplementing the analysis conducted by radiologists of medical images. The expectation is that computers will offer a more precise and consistent inspection than practiced human eyes that will be applied to ever more sophisticated, timely and complex medical images.
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NHS hooks up with dating app Tinder on organ donations - BBC News

NHS hooks up with dating app Tinder on organ donations - BBC News | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
The UK's health service is working with Tinder to persuade more young people to donate organs after death.
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10 Ways to Address Data Security Challenges in Healthcare -Vigyanix

10 Ways to Address Data Security Challenges in Healthcare -Vigyanix | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
Digital health has empowered us to manage and monitor our well-being. but has generated challenges for healthcare organizations on data security & privacy..
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“Unsexy Plumbing,” Integrated Data And The Future Of The Healthcare System | TechCrunch

“Unsexy Plumbing,” Integrated Data And The Future Of The Healthcare System | TechCrunch | What's up Health? | Scoop.it

economy, is being transformed by technology. The changes are most obvious at the front end of healthcare, where health payment solutions, data analytics tools, telehealth, wearable devices and other products and services are addressing the needs of both businesses and consumers.

But just as important is what’s happening behind the scenes, in the healthcare system’s back-end infrastructure. This “unsexy plumbing,” as it has been called, makes the front-end advances possible. For technology innovators, this plumbing also presents myriad opportunities: to reduce costs, streamline processes and shape the future of an industry that touches all Americans.

Despite its importance, the plumbing isn’t working particularly well. Healthcare information remains largely siloed and unintegrated, resulting in reduced efficiency, higher costs and poorer outcomes. According to a survey of IT leaders by MeriTalk, poor data integration is responsible for $342 billion in lost benefits every year as government health and human services agencies struggle to manage different datasets.

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Harnessing the power of digital health to eliminate mother-to-child HIV transmission | Devex

Harnessing the power of digital health to eliminate mother-to-child HIV transmission | Devex | What's up Health? | Scoop.it

Every year in Uganda, nearly 91,000 babies are born to HIV-infected mothers and risk starting their lives with a deadly disease. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV accounts for 21 percent of the total HIV transmission cases in the country.

Despite these figures, it’s important to remember that mother-to-child transmission is entirely preventable. In fact, simply through monitoring and tracking the delivery of a proven set of health interventions, the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV is very possible.

Digital health tools are helping to make eMTCT not just possible but also likely. Last week’s World AIDS Day marked a critical moment to explore how digital health can build essential connections among pregnant women, health facilities, health providers, and stewards of national health systems to ensure no newborns fall through the cracks.

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People don't use health apps until they get sick

People don't use health apps until they get sick | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
Back in March 2013, Research2Guidance counted in the neighborhood of 100,000 health, fitness and wellness apps in the Apple App Store and Google Play. That number almost certainly has increased since then.

Today, consumer health engagement company HealthMine said that while 64 percent of Americans own smartphones, just 18 percent of the general population enjoy learning health, wellness and lifestyle information via mobile apps. That’s based on a survey of 1,200 people by the Dallas-based company.

And then comes the money quote from the HealthMine press release: “Mobile health is still far from broad engagement—unless you are sick.” That’s because another HealthMine survey of 509 people with diabetes or pre-diabetes from August found that 42 percent manage their condition with mobile blood-sugar monitors, while 39 percent use mobile monitors for blood pressure.

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5 fashion labels working with digital health companies

5 fashion labels working with digital health companies | What's up Health? | Scoop.it

Polar Loop CrystalFitness device maker Polar recently launched a new wristworn activity tracking device, called Polar Loop Crystal, in partnership with Swarovski.Loop Crystal offers the same functionalities and software available in Polar’s Loop 2 band, which tracks steps, distance, sleep, and inactivity, but the Loop Crystal is embedded with 30 Swarovski crystals. While the Loop 2 costs $119.95, the Loop Crystal costs $159.95.Polar is just the latest wearables maker to partner with a designer to create a sleeker, more fashionable offering. Because wearable devices are often worn like accessories, the question of whether these devices are fashionable has been discussed for a number of years.


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Microsoft throws down gauntlet in health wearable sector

Microsoft throws down gauntlet in health wearable sector | What's up Health? | Scoop.it

New products will take health monitoring to new levels and even save livesMicrosoft intends to become the leader in advanced wearable technology for healthcare and medicine, according to Leila Martine, Microsoft product marketing director of New Device Experience.Speaking at the Mobile News ‘Wearables and Accessories’ conference held in London last week, Martine said:“[Microsoft chief executive] Satya Nadella was in London last week and brought us back to our heritage about helping every person and company to achieve more.”Microsoft, she said, was designing wearable devices which could take advanced biometrics to a new level and monitor complex cardio functionality such as VO2 max – the maximum amount of oxygen that can be removed from circulating blood and used by the body during a specified period.


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Assessing the Fitness of Wearable Tech

Assessing the Fitness of Wearable Tech | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
Older adults are among those who could benefit most from fitness trackers, but some experts caution that the devices may have a dark side.
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A Tiny Pill Monitors Vital Signs From Deep Inside The Body

A Tiny Pill Monitors Vital Signs From Deep Inside The Body | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
Sensors that work inside the body are gaining new skills. The latest version can track heart rate and respiratory rate, as well as temperature, as it travels through the digestive system.
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12 Things We Can 3D Print in Medicine - 3D Printing Industry

12 Things We Can 3D Print in Medicine - 3D Printing Industry | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
Dr. Bertalan Meskó gives a list of twelve phenomenal things that can already be 3D printed in medicine, with exciting implications for the future of medicine
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2,000 people a month sent far from home for NHS mental health care

2,000 people a month sent far from home for NHS mental health care | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
Former health minister Norman Lamb attacks ‘discrimination at heart of NHS’ that in bed shortage prioritises patients with physical over mental health problems
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The world’s first urine-powered wearable is here

The world’s first urine-powered wearable is here | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
We call it human waste, but thanks to a newly invented wearable, there's nothing wasteful about your urine.
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Startup gets $7M Series A, GE partnership to apply machine learning to medical imaging

Startup gets $7M Series A, GE partnership to apply machine learning to medical imaging | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
A lot of money and energy is being invested in improving upon and supplementing the analysis conducted by radiologists of medical images. The expectation is that computers will offer a more precise and consistent inspection than practiced human eyes that will be applied to ever more sophisticated, timely and complex medical images.
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Meet Oscar, The Health Insurance Startup That Wants To Revolutionize Healthcare

Meet Oscar, The Health Insurance Startup That Wants To Revolutionize Healthcare | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
Oscar, expanding to California and Texas, could be a model for the future of health coverage. Like Uber, it uses technology to enhance its services.
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Stanford scientists reveal artificial skin device for prosthetics

Stanford scientists reveal artificial skin device for prosthetics | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
Scientists at Stanford University are developing a synthetic skin that can detect pressure and send signals to living brain cells, a big step forward in the field and a potential boon for the creation of wearable electronics and implantable devices.
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MIT created an electronic bandage that heals wounds faster

MIT created an electronic bandage that heals wounds faster | What's up Health? | Scoop.it

At some point in the future, your bandage might do a lot more than just cover up your wound. Researchers at MIT have developed a malleable hydrogel that they can embed with sensors and apply to injury sites.

Xuanhe Zhao, an associate professor in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, has been working on creating a hydrogel that could be stretched and fitted to bond to other surfaces.

"Human tissues are soft and wet, but electronic devices are mostly hard and dry," Zhao told the Daily Dot. "We propose to use hydrogels with similar mechanical and physiological properties as human tissues to form long-term high-efficacy interfaces between human body and electronics."

This presented a challenge, as most common hydrogels are brittle and inflexible and don't adhere to electronic materials. Zhao's development of a stretchable, biocompatible hydrogel—consisting mostly of water and selected biopolymers—means that other researchers can utilize use the material in previously unimagined ways.

The material achieves a stiffness of between 10 to 100 kilopascals, essentially the same range as human soft tissue, which is crucial for its medical applications.


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Customer Journey Mapping -- the heart of Digital Transformation

Customer Journey Mapping -- the heart of Digital Transformation | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
Customer Journey Mapping is at the heart of Digital Transformation.
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FCC + FDA: Working together to regulate digital health

FCC + FDA: Working together to regulate digital health | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
How is medical device interoperability regulated? And, when it comes to mobile health apps, what should be regulated?

As medical devices converge with wireless technologies, the FCC along with the FDA is beginning to take an active role in regulating mobile health and device interoperability. This relationship between the two agencies was discussed at this week’s AdvaMed 2015 conference in San Diego.

The fact remains, after all, that the government must provide regulatory oversight for medical devices that communicate remotely – to preserve users’ privacy and security, and to ensure these devices actually work. And it’s a constant question over what should be regulated, and what should not.

“We make choices about which products to scrutinize, and which to not scrutinize,” said Bakul Patel, associate center director for digital health at FDA.  “That comes from the inherent heterogeneity of medical devices.”

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58% of Smartphone Owners Download & Use Mobile Health Apps

58% of Smartphone Owners Download & Use Mobile Health Apps | What's up Health? | Scoop.it

The findings from this study illustrate that mHealth app developers will need to consider some of the consumer concerns regarding the products such as excessive data entry requirements and the associated costs.Smartphone users seem to have a high regard for mobile health apps, especially those focused on providing diet and fitness support. A study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research shows that 58 percent of surveyed mobile phone users have downloaded at least one mobile health app onto their device.


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Jim Murphy's curator insight, November 8, 2015 2:43 PM

Takes more than just the app  #userexerience #value #care

Angelina Anzalone's curator insight, November 27, 2015 6:02 PM
This article discusses the somewhat of a decline in mobile health apps. Mobile health apps ted to cost a pretty penny and require users to enter a lot of information/data when using the apps. This has caused a slight decline in those who want to purchase these apps and users who don't want to waste so much time entering information. 

I personally feel that these two factors that are turning people away from these apps is a huge concern when it comes to the internet and these types of technologies. Apps should be constructed to be cost efficient and user friendly so that people will be more likely to partake in them. This in turn will allow for more people to partake in internet usage. 
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Health data from wearable devices could be restricted under new EU regulation

Health data from wearable devices could be restricted under new EU regulation | What's up Health? | Scoop.it

Law firm Osborne Clarke has called on regulators to rethink the implication of the future European General Data Protection Regulation on health informationA law firm has called on EU regulators to rethink the impact of the forthcoming European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) on data generated by health trackers and other wearables, including the Apple Watch, Fitbit and Garmin fitness bands.


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Brand-Name Drugs Can Raise Costs Without Boosting Patient Satisfaction

Brand-Name Drugs Can Raise Costs Without Boosting Patient Satisfaction | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
The website Iodine has collected data about consumers' experience with prescription drugs that show generics scored highest among people who take medicines in three popular categories.
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Evidation Health teams with Ochsner to study digital health efficacy | MobiHealthNews

Evidation Health teams with Ochsner to study digital health efficacy | MobiHealthNews | What's up Health? | Scoop.it

Evidation Health, a company launched by GE Ventures and Stanford Health, which works with various companies working in healthcare to develop a body of robust clinical evidence for digital health interventions, has announced a partnership with Ochsner Health System.

Ochsner Health, based in New Orleans, wasone of the first hospitals to work with Apple’s HealthKit and is known for creating a genius bar-style health app engagement center called the O Bar. Ochsner also has an innovation lab and accelerator called innovationOchsner (iO), focusing on developing “entirely new ways for healthcare providers to dramatically improve the quality of care by managing patient conditions more effectively and efficiently and for patients to be empowered to take an active role in monitoring, maintaining and enhancing their own health.”

Evidation Health will work with Ochsner on digital health interventions the health system is already testing as well as new efforts, according to Amy Belt Raimundo, chief business officer at Evidation.

“What we will be doing together is working on the studies of digital health solutions, both externally generated and internally generated,” she told MobiHealthNews. “To understand what matters, what has an impact, what can be implemented broadly. The kind of robust evidence that is traditional within healthcare, but that has been missing in a lot of the dialogue to date around digital health. Because there’s a lot of promise with a lot of solutions and the ability to collect data directly from patients, but you need to structure it in such a way that you can demonstrate that it’s meaningful.”

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"Molecular Tweeting" Could Hold the Key to Busting Superbugs

"Molecular Tweeting" Could Hold the Key to Busting Superbugs | What's up Health? | Scoop.it
A broader understanding of bacterial social networks might help scientists combat antibiotic resistance
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