What's happening in higher education?
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Indicator B4 What is the total public spending on education? | OECD READ edition

Indicator B4 What is the total public spending on education? | OECD READ edition | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it
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UK remains below OECD average

 

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Universities are all 'internationalising' now

Universities are all 'internationalising' now | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it
Universities have always had roles that transcend national boundaries, says Peter Scott, but there is an ugly side to internationalisation
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Improving equity in higher-education attainment is imperative - The Hill (blog)

Improving equity in higher-education attainment is imperative - The Hill (blog) | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it
Leadership is required from policymakers at the federal, state and institutional levels.
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Working-class students: 'there's a constant feeling you don't belong'

Working-class students: 'there's a constant feeling you don't belong' | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it
Universities need to do more to make working-class students feel welcome at elite universities, writes a student blogger
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Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Domains

Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Domains | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Vladimir Kukharenko, Luciana Viter
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Paula King, Ph.D.'s curator insight, May 26, 2014 7:48 PM

Helpful explanation.

Bob Irving's curator insight, May 27, 2014 8:21 AM

Well worth a read.

Dean Mantz's curator insight, May 30, 2014 10:21 AM

Special thanks to @Ana Cristina Pratas for sharing Don Clark's original post on http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html

 

Don has shared a vast number of resources on this post ranging from a diagram showing the changes between the original and updated Blooms to ISD concept maps and instructional design toolkits.  

Here is a quote from Don's post explaining Solo Taxonomy - "...one model that might prove more useful is the Structure of Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO) taxonomy. It is a model that describes levels of increasing complexity in a learner's understanding of subjects (Biggs, Collis, 1982). It aids both trainers and learners in understanding the learning process. The model consists of five levels in the order of understanding..." - See more at: http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html#sthash.X2Mab2Ks.dpuf

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A Visual Primer On Learning Theory

A Visual Primer On Learning Theory | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it
A Visual Primer On Learning Theory (RT @poida: SUPERB! RT @TeachThought: A Visual Primer On LEARNING THEORY.
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Journal Articles - Cultivating Student Global Competence: A Pilot Experimental Study - Li

Journal Articles - Cultivating Student Global Competence: A Pilot Experimental Study - Li | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education - Vol 11, No 1, pp. 125–143, Jan 2013

Although student global competence has been recognized as an important learning outcome by more and more colleges and universities, campus internationalization efforts remain fragmented and largely ineffective. We proposed a pedagogical intervention that provided students from China and the U.S. with opportunities to establish virtual contact and to work collaboratively on international business related research papers. Then, we operationalized global competence as a three-dimensional concept and designed an instrument to measure student global competence. The results provided some initial evidence on American students’ significantly lower performance in global knowledge and attitude, and confirmed the proposed pedagogical intervention as an easy-to-use and effective supplement to develop student global competence.


Via Adriana Diaz
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JOURNAL - SPECIAL ISSUE - Contemporary issues on the internationalisation of higher education: critical and comparative perspectives

JOURNAL - SPECIAL ISSUE - Contemporary issues on the internationalisation of higher education: critical and comparative perspectives | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education: Vol.43, Issue 1, 2013 -

The internationalisation of higher education (HE) is a salient development

and is regularly discussed at both institutional and system levels. In recent
years, internationalisation has generated much policy-related, academic and
institutional research. In this special issue we present examples of how HE
researchers are beginning to undertake a broader range of studies related to
the internationalisation of their sector, going far beyond the traditional (and
much researched) focus on the commercial aspects of international HE (particularly international recruitment). Although the term ‘internationalisation’ means different things to different people. in different contexts, there is a growing recognition of the need to ‘rethink’ internationalisation to take account of these multiple perspectives and different meanings of the concept.


Via Adriana Diaz
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7.5 Quality assurance in transnational education: changing approaches to meet stakeholder needs?

7.5 Quality assurance in transnational education: changing approaches to meet stakeholder needs? | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

Transnational education (TNE) or cross border education is characterised by mobility of higher education students, programmes, providers and resources across national jurisdiction/borders. TNE represents an area of tremendous potential for countries, students and education providers. It is therefore an area that requires considerable scrutiny.

The session examines quality assurance in TNE and its impact. It also considers how, as TNE grows, approaches to quality assurance might change to meet the needs of difference stakeholders. Presentations include the UK Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) review of UK TNE in China; a Malaysian Ministry of Higher Education commissioned research project which examines the UK-Malaysian TNE experience; and research on TNE quality management and the student experience. The session asks:

• is the way that quality in TNE is currently measured fit for future purpose?

• what should the role of the host country be in assuring TNE quality in the future?

• to what extent can a model designed to meet student expectations in one country be effective in meeting the expectations of students studying in another?

The session provides an overview of the debate for newcomers, but will be of primary interest to practitioners, strategists, teachers, administrators and funding bodies.


Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris, Adriana Diaz
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Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris's curator insight, February 16, 2013 6:16 AM

Join me in this session where I will speak, together with other distinguished speakers, about quality in TNE.

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Graduate Attributes and the Internationalized Curriculum: Embedding a Global Outlook in Disciplinary Learning Outcomes

Internationalization of the curriculum attracts considerable interest, yet often remains in the hands of enthusiasts or is relegated to the periphery of personal skills modules. While academics may be “happy to ‘tinker around the edges’ of their course content and classroom pedagogy” they still frequently ask, “What does it really mean for me and my classroom?” This article outlines the experience of one U.K. university, which has been seeking to internationalize the curriculum through two phases. The overarching development framework of the first phase (Jones & Killick, 2007) is now being embedded through the university’s adoption of a global outlook as a graduate attribute. This attribute interlinks inclusivity and global relevance and connects equality and diversity with internationalization to form a cohesive construct for graduate development. The authors describe the process of working with academics across the institution to design and implement learning outcomes at modular and program levels within disciplines, to support student achievement of this attribute through the process of constructive alignment.


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UNESCO - Intercultural Competences - Conceptual and Operational Framework


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JOURNAL ARTICLE - Strangerhood and intercultural subjectivity

JOURNAL ARTICLE - Strangerhood and intercultural subjectivity | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

"Strangerhood and intercultural subjectivity. Language and Intercultural Communication" (Simon Coffey - 2013) - Language and Intercultural Communication Journal - ABSTRACT - An increasingly salient justification for the study of foreign languages is the value of language learning for developing intercultural competence, and in particular for showing how interculturality meshes with widespread aims of equity and acceptance of the stranger in new contexts of global diversity. In this article I consider intercultural experience of language learning through the model of strangerhood, a concept first advanced by Simmel as a necessary marginality in society (the stranger as a social type) and later developed by Kristeva (drawing on Freud) as an internalised feature of late modern individuals which requires us to live with the ambivalence of different subject positions, each of us carrying strangerhood within us. A key but under-examined aspect in the development of intercultural competence is understanding our own (inter)subjective predispositions which we bring to intercultural encounters, and how these mediate our sense of belonging or, conversely, of alienation, a major trope of narratives of mobility and language learning. Presenting extracts from language learners’ autobiographical data I examine how individuals position themselves as strangers, set apart from the mainstream, and how this trope constructs narrative worlds of outsiderness. Autobiographical narration offers a discursive space for developing our understanding of the social world, with the potential to take us beyond realist descriptions towards an enquiry into how language and place are symbolically appropriated in our lives. Sociological frames (e.g. as proposed by Bourdieu or Wenger) have extended our understanding of inequity and assumptions of power in intercultural settings and this paper contributes further by proposing strangerhood as a psychological disposition requiring language learners to observe beyond themselves while also apprehending one's own image as this refracts and changes shape through the lens of others.


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Acting as Global Citizens: A challenge to U.S. colleges and universities


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The war against humanities at Britain's universities - The Guardian

The war against humanities at Britain's universities - The Guardian | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it
Our universities are squeezing every ounce of efficiency out of lecturers and focusing on the ‘profitable’ areas of science, tech and maths. Could the humanities be wiped out?
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The majority of international students studying across the UK feel unwelcome and a significant amount would not recommend the UK as a place to study, new NUS research has found.

The majority of international students studying across the UK feel unwelcome and a significant amount would not recommend the UK as a place to study, new NUS research has found. | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

Via heather dawson
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heather dawson's curator insight, February 12, 2015 7:51 AM

Download the survey from the NUS which focuses on the impact of immigration bill

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Online universities post huge profits as more students move online

Online universities post huge profits as more students move online | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

Online universities will earn $4.9 billion in the 2014-15 financial year, as more tertiary students study for degrees over the Internet.


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Developing the Global Student: Higher education in an era of globalization (Paperback) - Routledge

Developing the Global Student: Higher education in an era of globalization (Paperback) - Routledge | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it
Developing the Global Student addresses the question of how students of higher education can emerge from their university life better equipped to dwell more effectively, ethically, and comfortably amidst the turmoils of a globalizing world. It does this...
David Killick's insight:

Would value feedback on my new book

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The Myth of Learning Styles

The Myth of Learning Styles | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it
For many years educators were under the false notion that there were learning styles, and recent research from Howard Gardner, John Hattie and Gregory Yates shows there isn't such thing as a learning style.
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Freire, MOOCs and Pedagogy of the Oppressed

Freire, MOOCs and Pedagogy of the Oppressed | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it
An email notification of a forthcoming conference at the University of Central Lancashire (uclan) - Paulo Freire and Transformative Education: changing lives and transforming communities (28th Apri...
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The Internationalisation of UK Universities – a progress report

The Internationalisation of UK Universities – a progress report | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

Philip Warwick, Senior Teaching Fellow at Durham University Business School, UK, writes at guest blog on the state of internationalisation in British universities. Professor Warwick has been studying the international strategies of a number of universities in the UK and in other countries. He has found that approaches vary across countries. Within the UK he has identified four specific strategies to international development within the group of universities he studied. 


Via Adriana Diaz
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Internationalisation begins with the curriculum - University World News

Internationalisation begins with the curriculum - University World News | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

“You can’t have comprehensive internationalisation without internationalisation of the curriculum,” said Professor John Hudzik to a diverse gathering of academics and managers at a recent International Education Association of Australia (IEAA) event in Brisbane, Australia. 


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Internationalizing the Curriculum in the Disciplines—Imagining New Possibilities

Internationalizing the Curriculum in the Disciplines—Imagining New Possibilities | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

Internationalization of the curriculum provides challenges and opportunities for academic staff and institutions. This article reports on research undertaken in 2010-2011, which engaged academic staff in different disciplines and universities in the process of exploring and making explicit the meaning of internationalization of the curriculum in their disciplines. One of the outcomes of the research was a five-stage model of the process of internationalization of the curriculum. A critical part of the process involved small groups of staff discussing existing paradigms within their disciplines, questioning “what we believe” in relation to the curriculum and student learning and imagining and negotiating new possibilities. The article argues that internationalization of the curriculum should be a planned, developmental, and cyclical process and that employing the imagination is an essential part of the process of internationalization of the curriculum in any discipline.


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Applying Quality Principles to Australian University Transnational Teaching & Learning

Applying Quality Principles to Australian University Transnational Teaching & Learning | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

This collaborative research project focused on embedding principles of quality into practice to enhance learning and teaching quality in Australian transnational higher education. Building on a successful ALTC-funded projectwhich developed key quality principles for transnational learning and teaching, this project enabled and encouraged the application of these principles to educational delivery.

 

Full texts here http://transnationalquality.curtin.edu.au/ ;


Via Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris, Adriana Diaz
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Dr Vangelis Tsiligiris's curator insight, May 9, 2013 7:17 AM

This is a very interesting project which provides a valuable set of outcomes for the management of educational quality in TNHE.

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Journal Article: Swimming in the deep end: transnational teaching as culture learning? (HERDSA - Lynnel Hoarea)

Journal Article: Swimming in the deep end: transnational teaching as culture learning? (HERDSA - Lynnel Hoarea) | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT: Drawing upon the experiences of a group of academics who were responsible for the teaching and coordination of a newly established offshore program, this study considers intercultural learning during transnational education (TNE) sojourns and demonstrates that the personal and pedagogical adaptation required of academics is significant. The study combines data from pre-, during- and post-sojourn interviews with detailed observations of offshore teaching. This ethnographic methodology provides a detailed account of the TNE experience that is rare in the literature. The study adds support to the contention that the acknowledgement of cultural distance, rather than the adoption of a universalist mindset, is a precondition for development of intercultural competence through transnational teaching. The reflections of the respondents indicate that when transnational educators are prepared to learn from the ambiguity encountered during offshore teaching, they have the capacity to experience personal growth and to add significantly to their university's human capital. The paper argues that this ‘preparedness’ to learn should not be left to chance lest it does not eventuate and that the responsibility for development is shared between transnational educators, who must be open to change and prepared to engage in self-reflection that can be confronting, and universities, who must formally recognise the need to provide time, resources and quality, ethical learning interventions in order to facilitate the development of intercultural competence in all staff, especially those who teach overseas.

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cher20/current#.UcYbgPlkPng


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Cultivating Cosmopolitanism for Intercultural Communication Communicating as a Global Citizens By Miriam Sobré-Denton, Nilanjana Bardhan - Routledge

Cultivating Cosmopolitanism for Intercultural Communication Communicating as a Global Citizens By Miriam Sobré-Denton, Nilanjana Bardhan - Routledge | What's happening in higher education? | Scoop.it

This book engages the notion of cosmopolitanism as it applies to intercultural communication, which itself is undergoing a turn in its focus from post-positivistic research towards critical/interpretive and postcolonial perspectives, particularly as globalization informs more of the current and future research in the area. It emphasizes the postcolonial perspective in order to raise critical consciousness about the complexities of intercultural communication in a globalizing world, situating cosmopolitanism—the notion of global citizenship—as a multilayered lens for research. Cosmopolitanism as a theoretical repertoire provides nuanced descriptions of what it means to be and communicate as a global citizen, how to critically study interconnectedness within and across cultures, and how to embrace differences without glossing over them. Moving intercultural communication studies towards the global in complex and nuanced ways, this book highlights crucial links between globalization, transnationalism, postcolonialism, cosmopolitanism, social injustice and intercultural communication, and will help in the creation of classroom spaces devoted to exploring these links. It also engages the links between theory and praxis in order to move towards intercultural communication pedagogy and research that simultaneously celebrates and interrogates issues of cultural difference with the aim of creating continuity rather than chasms.  In sum, this book orients intercultural communication scholarship firmly towards the critical and postcolonial, while still allowing the incorporation of traditional intercultural communication concepts, thereby preparing students, scholars, educators and interculturalists to communicate ethically in a world that is simultaneously global and local.


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