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What's Happening to Africa's Rhino?
So many stories! Here's a quick look at the good, bad, ugly and encouraging RHINO NEWS
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THE MYTH: Tips to revitalize sex life after 50 with traditional Chinese medicine

THE MYTH: Tips to revitalize sex life after 50 with traditional Chinese medicine | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
eMaxHealthTips to revitalize sex life after 50 with traditional Chinese medicineeMaxHealthHowever, she feels that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an approach that has addressed these issues for centuries.

 

the MYTH PERPETUATED!

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Anthony Brown's comment, February 6, 2013 4:09 AM
Everyone men and woman must read this to enjoy sex life - http://www.rosebudmag.com/lifestyle/sex-advice/sex-orgasm-women-men-sexual-dysfunction
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Beyond biodiversity: Sustainable development implications of South Africa’s “rhino wars”

“Our rhinos are part of our valuable ecotourism and safari industries. Their very existence creates employment and generates important tourism revenue,” says Mike Rumble of the African Conservation Trust.

 

In 2011, South African President Jacob Zuma announced six priority areas to boost job creation in South Africa, tourism being one of them. According to Zuma, for every 16 tourists that visit the country, one South African job is created....

 

“Ecotourism has a far greater potential for contributing to income and livelihoods in poor rural communities than what is realised,” says Edgar Kaeslin, from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

 

Tourists from all over the world visit South Africa to observe the country’s rich natural environment and rare species. Black rhinos - considered one of the rarest rhinos in Africa - are a main attraction in South Africa and are responsible for driving much tourism in the region....

 

But these ecotourism spin-off benefits are in jeopardy. The recent drop in numbers of black rhinos due to poaching has caused a spike in the value of their horns which, in turn, is stimulating the black market....

 

 

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SOUTH AFRICAN CITIZENS ARE BEING DEPRIVED OF THEIR WILDLIFE HERITAGE

Investigation exposes serious problems in the Conservation & Wildlife Sectors

 

20th August 2012

 

Members of the Facebook Rhino activism group RHINO SOS S.A. are deeply concerned over recent revelations of irregularities regarding the conservation of wildlife and in particular the conservation of South Africa’s iconic Rhino species.

 

The illusions they once held of a well regulated and organized sector have been shattered with new information emanating from the recent Rhino Dialogue Workshops held by the Department of Water & Environmental Affairs (DWEA).

 

Minister Edna Molewa commissioned Mavuso Msimang, a former Cabinet minister and ANC stalwart, to consult with various stakeholders and submit a report to her by September.

To that end various Rhino Talks have been held in Johannesburg and Durban and the concluding workshop where the issues were summarized was held in Johannesburg on the 15th August.

 

Founder and spokesperson of RHINO SOS SA, Margot Stewart, says she felt privileged to be invited to some of the Workshops but sadly what she learned there only confirmed the worst fears that her research of the past 6 months had indicated.

 

This includes:

 

· ineptitude and mismanagement, including corruption with National Parks staff involved in wildlife crime

 

· old (& new) rivalries & feuds between stakeholders

 

· a lack of communication between the Government, conservation authorities and the private sector

 

· gross abuse of Wildlife including farmers staging their own “poaching’s” and canned hunting

 

· mishandling of the permitting system, smuggling and sales of animal parts to criminal syndicates

· non-compliance by many of the Wildlife ranchers and traders.

 

Even worse, Margot says, is the realization that the very same authorities that have the responsibility of making important decisions about the welfare of Wildlife are biased towards the creation of a Central Selling Organisation which is in danger of fostering a system of gradual domestication of wildlife.

 

It was found that the industry caters to the needs of hunters and ranchers rather than tourists and nature lovers. Pure conservation - for the sake of preserving wilderness areas and iconic wild animals - is not practiced anymore and has been replaced by a culture of “sustainable use” also known as “it stays only if it pays”.

 

This unacceptable state of affairs has been developing over the past 30 years or so. RHINO SOS believes that only an urgent, complete overhaul of the present system can put us back on the road of preserving wilderness areas and the wildlife it contains.

 

SOUTH AFRICA NOT IN TUNE WITH THE REST OF THE WORLD

 

*South African wildlife ranching is unique in the world with its exempted wildlife ranches, where the wildlife belongs to the owner of the land. The current Legal status of wildlife as Res Nullius (without owner) needs to be changed to something more protective.

 

*South Africa is the only country in the world where the big five can be legally hunted.

 

*Today the number of animals owned by the private sector is about 3 to 4 times more than the number in government protected areas – obviously all of these animals originated from the State owned parks that began to dispose of surplus wildlife on their reserves in the 1960’s.

 

*Wildlife ranching is the fastest growing agricultural activity in South Africa in the past three decades. [(In 1965 there were 4 fenced game ranches, today OVER 9,000 private game ranches OR 16.8% of total land area of SA is involved in the industry. (du Toit)]

 

The iconic Kruger National Park accounts for the largest section of land that has been set aside as wilderness area, but it is now under attack from a combination of:

 

· Armed insurgents from neighbouring countries like Zimbabwe and Mozambique – some fences between the KNP and these countries were dropped with the institution of the Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Park

 

· Local communities who have instituted land claims and who poach for bushmeat

 

· Farmers on the Western boundary have dropped the fences between them and the KNP and due to agreements with SANParks have free access to game that wanders onto their land.

 

Hunting and harvesting of animals occurs on some of these farms

 

· The Northern section of the KNP has substantial coal reserves and is being eyed greedily by mining interests already in the area.

 

· Current management of the KNP is opting for developing the Park with luxury hotels and a Casino has also been suggested.

 

A trend is developing where the KNP could be sliced up between the various interested parties and lose its original function which was for the “creation of the area ultimately as a great national park where the natural and prehistoric conditions of our country can be preserved for all time.”

Recently there has even been a land claim from the Kingdom of Swaziland over the southern section of the KNP.

 

Considering that only approx. 6% of South Africa is under conservation of which only half of that is Game Reserve these claims and attacks on the Kruger National Park are of great concern.

 

Another trend is that wildlife in the National Parks is moving at a rapid pace into the possession of private owners who offer luxury safari packages to wealthy tourists and/or hunters on their property.

 

The average South African citizen could find themselves deprived of affordable opportunities to enjoy nature and their wildlife heritage. At the Workshop on the 15th August, Margot asked Dr. Richard Emslie, a consultant to the Government and the Scientific expert on African rhino, if it wasn’t possible that eventually more rhinos would exist on rhino farms than in game reserves and if this wasn’t of concern to him.

 

His reply: “Then it would be a success!”

 

RHINO SOS does not consider domesticated, dehorned rhinos standing in paddocks eating hay a successful solution to the rhino poaching problem. Rhinos are not as Dr. Emslie claims: “just like any other investment.”

 

The pro – and anti – rhino horn issue has been debated in depth and more information on this can be found on the RHINO SOS Group on Facebook.

 

We call on the South African Government to institute an immediate over haul of the Wildlife and Conservation sector. South Africa cannot afford to delay this process because only 20,000 rhinos remain in the world and in 2011 three species went extinct in the wild, one of which (the Western Black) is now totally extinct.

 

RHINO SOS is not alone in thinking that WILDLIFE BELONGS IN THE WILD, in their natural habitat and free from abuse by humans. There are a multitude of organisations – mainly non-profit, that agrees. Rian Geldenhuys, founder of the 17,000 member strong STIR (Stop Trade in Rhino) www.causes.com/stir < http://www.causes.com/stir  >; says that South Africa will be short-sighted to sell bogus medicine to gullible cancer patients in SE Asia, as the total income that can be earned from that crime, is not even 0.3% of the GDP. It is therefore not worth becoming a pariah nation for.

 

The South African Wildlife & Conservation sector is on a slippery slope to destroying our heritage of Africa of old. We need assistance from all concerned Citizens of the World to stop the cruelty especially with regard to Rhino farming. It is NOT ACCEPTABLE for rhinos to be killed or maimed to obtain a product that is used for a spurious medical practice. With all respect to the Far Eastern nations who have superstitious beliefs in the power of rhino horn, there are other better and cheaper alternatives such as Willow Bark (Aspirin) or Amino Acid Supplements that should be utilized.

 

TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE EXTREME VULNERABILITY OF THE RHINOCEROS POPULATIONS OF THE WORLD, RHINO SOS PROPOSES THAT:

 

1. ALL RHINO HORN STOCKPILES BE BURNED

2. ALL RHINOS OF THE WORLD BE CLASSIFIED ON C.I.T.E.S APPENDIX I. THIS WOULD REQUIRE THAT THE RHINO POPULATION OF SOUTH AFRICA AND SWAZILAND BE RE-CLASSIFIED FROM APPENDIX II BACK TO APPENDIX I.

 

THE RE-CLASSIFICATION OF THE WHITE RHINO TO APPENDIX I WILL DISALLOW ANY TYPE OF TRADE AND AFFORD THE SPECIES THE HIGHEST FORM OF PROTECTION INTERNATIONALLY.

 

Margot Stewart

RHINO SOS

https://www.facebook.com/groups/rhinosos /

Durban

South Africa

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In Vietnam, Rhino Horn is the Drug of Choice at both Parties and Hospitals

In Vietnam, Rhino Horn is the Drug of Choice at both Parties and Hospitals | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
A new report issued by TRAFFIC issues the latest depressing statistics surrounding the epidemic-proportion illegal rhino horn trade between South Africa and Asia.
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TRAFFIC warns over 500 rhinos could perish this year

TRAFFIC warns over 500 rhinos could perish this year | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Global wildlife monitoring network TRAFFIC warned Tuesday that 515 rhinos could perish by the end of the year if no action is taken to stem the illicit trade in rhino horns....

 

South Africa, home to about three quarters of Africa's 20,000 or so white rhinos and 4,800 critically endangered black rhinos, has in recent years witnessed an unprecedented spike in sophisticated, violent and organised rhino-related criminal activities.

 

Last year 448 rhinos were killed compared to 13 animals in 2007.

South Africa has lately scaled up its fight against illegal poaching and trade in rhinos horns, arresting 176 suspects so far this year, more than the 165 arrested in the 12 months of 2010....

 

But she warned that even with the successful stories of high-value arrests the criminal syndicates appeared generally to be a step ahead -- better equipped, well funded.

 

"As anti-poaching security levels are stepped up, the poaching gangs become more aggressive and increasingly sophisticated," she said.

 

The report named Vietnam as the worst offender fuelling the trade in the black market for rhino horns.

 

"The bottom line is that we are not close to ending this crisis yet, we are probably going to get record numbers this year," warned the report's co-author Tom Milliken, who is also an expert on rhinos at TRAFFIC.

 

The grounded horn, which is believed by some to cure cancers, has taken on a new use and is now being pushed as a recreational drug mixed with drinks at elite "rhino wine associations" parties in the belief that it cures hangover.

 

The report says the only way to end illegal rhino hunting is to cut off the demand, by pushing Vietnam to boldly show commitment and decisively enforce laws that prohibit trade in the horns....

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IMAGE: Witness Protection for the Rhino

IMAGE: Witness Protection for the Rhino | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

From our friends at Wild at Heart

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Image: One by One, Until All Rhino are Gone!

Image: One by One, Until All Rhino are Gone! | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Thank you Ciske Kruger.

 

Every 18 hours a rhino is brutally killed for its horn. This years tally stands at 326.

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“Traditional” Chinese Veterinary Medicine – A Modern Fairy Tale

“Traditional” Chinese Veterinary Medicine – A Modern Fairy Tale | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

History is one of the things that I love. I think it’s really important. And I think it’s really sad when history gets misstated, or distorted, and especially so when that distortion is used to sell something to people....

 

Unfortunately, there’s a small subset of individuals that say that they are practicing what they call “Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine” (TCVM) on animals, including horses. They say that they’re practicing according to how the ancient Chinese practiced veterinary medicine on animals, practicing in a way that’s different from the unnatural, reductionist, drug- and surgery-filled “western” medicine that most veterinarians are taught. And in some sense, I’d say that they’re right; what they are doing is certainly different. And it also has essentially nothing to do with the way that the Chinese practiced veterinary medicine on animals throughout history.


Instead, what the “TCVM” advocates have come up is a modern fairy tale – loosely based on a selected few historical theoretical concepts, and fine-tuned for western sensibilities – that has no foundation in how veterinary medicine was actually practiced in China. Not only are these “TCVM” proponents inventing nonsense, but they’re trivializing, obscuring, and covering up a very interesting, real, and as yet largely undocumented, chapter in veterinary history....

 

Look, I’m not trying to say that the ancient Chinese people who treated animals were dumb or anything. The historical practitioners of Chinese medicine did the best they could. So did everyone else who treated animals – and people for that matter. However, in every historical culture who was trying to treat illness, the practitioners of medicine just didn’t have any idea what was going on, that is, they didn’t know the basis of real underlying causes of disease. It must have been very frustrating – even as veterinary medicine can sometimes be today.

 

Still, historical medical practitioners had to have something with which to explain the scary processes of disease, illness, and death. So, people believed in things like evil spirits and bad humours. The Chinese thought that your dead ancestors were very influential on your health. People prayed, sacrificed, burned, purged, bleed, poked, ate plants, sat in salt mines, and did myriad other wild, crazy, and sometimes desperate things to try to improve their health and cure disease (the history of medicine is really quite eye-opening)....

 

 

 

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SA, Vietnam partner against rhino poaching

SA, Vietnam partner against rhino poaching | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
South Africa and Vietnam have vowed to work closer together to prevent the illegal trading of rhino horns. 

 

The two countries held bilateral talks in Pretoria yesterday. According to the Department of Environmental Affairs, South Africa has already lost more than 240 rhinos to illegal hunting since the beginning of the year....

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Rhino poaching toll rises

Rhino poaching toll rises | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
KwaZulu-Natal - In just four days, between Sunday and Wednesday, three more rhinos fell victim to poachers at Hluhluwe and Imfolozi, bringing the year’s provincial tally to 32, and to 319 nationally.

 

“One animal lost is one animal too many. (This) is a disappointment and has saddened us all here at Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife,” said Jabulani Ngubane, the head of rhino poaching investigations for Ezemvelo.

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SA uses high-tech to protect rhinos

Sea Shepherd’s O.R.C.A. Force, in collaboration with South Africa’s anti poaching specialists SPOTS (Strategic Protection of Threatened Species) is using high tech equipment, working day and night to enforce anti-poaching law, guiding the rhino through the full moon cycle.

 

The full moon period each month is the most dangerous time for the critically endangered rhino. While the golden orb, floating over the African wilderness, creates an amazing panorama for tourists, it also illuminates the bush making the rhino a very easy target for illegal poachers to track down and kill for its immensely valuable horn.

 

“Over the last few days three rhino have been horribly killed in the surrounding reserves”, says South African team member Dinielle Stöckigt. “We are here to do whatever is needed to protect Africa’s natural treasures in this area.”

 

During the day O.R.C.A. Force team members assist in armed patrols, checking the perimeter fences for breaches and illegal intruders. At night we use high tech night vision, thermal imaging and UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) equipment to search for the criminals plundering South Africa’s natural resources.

 

Just the other night the team responded to three gunshots heard in close proximity to their encampment. Immediately the combined Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) team of SPOTS and Sea Shepherd launched UAS equipped with thermal imagery to search for movement on the ground.

 

“This is better than any volunteer experience I can imagine”, says UAS expert Jake Weber, ex Black Hawk and drone pilot for the US Army. “Having a 7.62 FN rifle in one hand, a pair of night goggles in the other, driving at 2 AM on rough tracks that can barely support a vehicle and flying Unmanned Aerial Systems to prevent endangered animals from extinction is not the typical safari experience– this is the real salt-of-the-earth stuff.”

 

WildlifeMargrit:

Way to go Peter and team! 

You can donate to help these high tech efforts to save the last rhino via Nikela (100% of your donation, minus bank fees, goes to protect rhino)

http://www.Nikela.org 

 

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Eleven suspects arrested for rhino poaching |

Eleven suspects were arrested on Tuesday in connection with rhino poaching in the Borakalalo and Madikwe Game...

 

The reports follow incidents in Borakalalo Game Reserve near Brits, where the Anti Poaching Unit rangers responded to a gunshot on August 7, after which a thorough sweeping of the area, 5 rhinoceros were found killed and dehorned, according to the board....

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Rhino poachers sentenced to 28 years

Rhino poachers sentenced to 28 years | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Newcastle, KwaZulu-Natal - The prospect of making a substantial amount of money was what attracted two KwaZulu-Natal farmers to the illegal hunting of rhinos.

 

Ewart Potgieter, 34, of Louwsberg, and Riaan Vermaak, 32, of Newcastle, pleaded guilty in the Vryheid Regional Court this week to charges of conspiracy to hunt rhino and attempting to hunt rhino and the possession of illegal firearms and ammunition.

 

Potgieter was sentenced to 18 years’ imprisonment – six years for conspiracy to hunt rhino and attempting to hunt rhino, 10 years for possession of illegal firearms and two years for possession of illegal ammunition.

 

Vermaak received 10 years and six months – six years for for conspiracy to hunt rhino and attempting to hunt rhino, four years for possession of illegal firearms and six months for possession of illegal ammunition.

 

They will serve an effective 11 years and seven-and-a-half years respectively....

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Lost Page Restored: Direct Wire Donation Option Now Available | Nikela

Lost Page Restored: Direct Wire Donation Option Now Available | Nikela | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
You asked for options to donate to Nikela Projects. Use your credit card, make a bank transfer or direct wire to save endangered and threatened African wildlife.
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Winners: Picture the Change in rhino poaching and SA’s inequities

Winners: Picture the Change in rhino poaching and SA’s inequities | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

The winners of the Picture the Change photographic competition have been announced. The winner in the media category was Michael Raimondo, founder and director of film production company Green Renaissance, which captured the translocation of 19 rhino to a safer locality as part of WWF’s Black Rhino Range Expansion Project.

 

The second award of the evening went to Durban photographer Rob Greaves. Captioned “some sacrifices in life are hard to understand”, it depicts a nanny carrying a white child on her back, while her own toddler walks alongside her.

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COMACO turns poachers into farmers and conservationists

What would you do to survive?

It was a bad season for crops. Your food harvest was too little to carry your family through to the next harvest. The time you devoted to growing cotton kept you from growing more food and the money you earned from the cotton company is still not enough to meet your needs. You were desperate then and you're desperate now. You have a family of 6, you have no money and no food. How are you going to feed your family? Today you don't have any other crops to sell, so you have to find another way to survive... You take actions into your own hands and go out and kill an elephant so your family can survive. Conservationists around the world now hate you. They call you a greedy, selfish, inhumane poacher without even knowing the whole story... Watch the video below and see how COMACO figured out this crucial connection between poor, hungry people and conservation of animals and ecosystems.  

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A call for Tanzania to make saving the #rhino priority one

Tanzania which leads in Africa and in some cases in the world in offering a rich variety and abundance of wild life, faces the risk of losing it all, if it does not seriously face up to and remove the threats to the survival of the species....

 

For a long time now, we have been reading about the efforts being made to protect the rhino, now under the threat of extinction, though it once boasted of a population of over 70,000 on the continent.


Indeed statistics given by the Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism, Khamis Kagasheki show how difficult it has been for authorities to put a stop to the massacre of the animal, hunted mainly for its horn, highly sought after in the oriental world for traditional medicine.


Kagasheki explained that during the 1960s, it was estimated that there were about 70,000 black rhinos in Africa, of which 10,000 were in Tanzania, the largest concentrations in the continent....

 

It is true that Tanzania is not alone in the near-impossible battle to save the rhino hunted down by criminal gangs backed by oriental groups with big money....

 

Given their low birth rate and the threat of its most deadly predator – the poacher - their continued existence at best lies in the artificial, but hopefully a more secure environment of the zoo, as recommended by Prof Kayumbo.

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VIDEO: South Africa's Rhino Orphanage

VIDEO: South Africa's Rhino Orphanage | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Video on TODAY.com: A five-month-old black rhinoceros is the first resident at a center in South Africa that takes in rhino orphans whose parents have died from poachers. TODAY.com's Dara Brown reports.
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Rhino horn use slammed by Chinese traditional medicinal practitioners

Rhino horn use slammed by Chinese traditional medicinal practitioners | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Another important body in the Chinese medicinal community has come out strongly against the use of rhino horn in traditional remedies.

 

WildlifeMargrit:

So why, a year later is the rate of rhino poaching still escalating?

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Thanks Angie
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A practical move for our first Chinese medicine hospital

Most people have misread the new Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying. The newly-announced high-powered body to advance development of Chinese medicine is by no means intended to rebuild the Chinese medicine hub in Hong Kong. In fact, the new leader did not make any strategic advances to build a Chinese herbal trade center. What Leung announced earlier this week was an intent to boost the development of the Chinese medical profession and Chinese medical services in the city.


The new government is pragmatic and rational. Past lessons are too bitter and horrifying. The publicly-funded Hong Kong Jockey Club Institute of Chinese Medicine was disbanded last year after standing for a decade. Its closure exposed its poor planning, unclear direction and heavy administrative cost, despite its lavish annual budget of HK$500 million. It also revealed the lack of commitment and determination among the local Chinese medicine industry to inject heavy investment on scientific research and testing. Although official efforts continue to support a sustainable development of Chinese medicines through the Innovation and Technology Fund, the new ruling team is not convinced it should go for an unattainable goal.

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'Scamsters put SA rhinos at risk'

'Scamsters put SA rhinos at risk' | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Scamsters who pretend to be raising money to help fight rhino poaching are putting conservation efforts at risk.

 

This is the warning from environmentalists who are worried about the mushrooming of organisations claiming to be on the side of the endangered species. The public is being confused by all the projects meant to help rhinos and there is a risk of donor fatigue.

 

Keyrings, T-shirts, hand chains, CDs, plush toys, and even rhinos as wedding gifts can be bought to save SA’s endangered rhino population. According to experts there are now at least 260 new NGOs.

 

Last week retired Proteas cricketer Mark Boucher became the latest celebrity to throw his weight behind the anti-rhino poaching campaign.

 

Boucher, together with SAB, launched the SAB-Boucher Non-Profit Company with the aim of raising R1 million to register SA’s 18 000 rhinos on a DNA database.

 

At the last count, according to Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, the number of rhino poached since the beginning of the year is 219, with 32 in KZN.

 

While money is needed for anti-rhino poaching initiatives such as increased border control measures and sniffer dogs at international airports, some of the country’s leading NGOs are concerned.

 

Jabulani Ngubane, anti-rhino poaching co-ordinator at Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, said having so many projects could be confusing to the average citizen. And with increasingly simpler ways to make a contribution, such as buying a hand chain, and constantly being bombarded with the “save the rhino” message, the public are at risk of being “rhino-ed out”.

 

Kirsty Brebner, rhino project manager at the Endangered Wildlife Trust, said at their last count there were 260 new NGOs raising money for rhinos.

 

“This is of great concern as it contributes to donor fatigue,” said Brebner.

 

She said there were fake organisations raising money, and this tarnished the image of legitimate NGOs. She urged people to ensure that they donated to, and purchased items from, legitimate NGOs, by asking questions about their work and financial statements. - Saturday Star

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Poachers kill eight rhinos in Brits reserve

Poachers kill eight rhinos in Brits reserve | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

The Borakalalo Game Reserve near Brits has lost eight rhinos to poachers and two young calves that died due to natural causes and starvation respectively in the past week.


Ms Mamaki Phoolo of the North West Parks and Tourism Board told Kormorant that rangers of the Anti Poaching Unit responded to a gunshot fired in the reserve on 7 August, a thorough sweep of the area lead them to five rhinos, dead and dehorned. The matter was promptly reported to the SAPS who collected forensic material for further investigation.


The second incident was reported on Sunday during the annual game count. Five more rhino carcasses were found, including two calves. Two of the rhinos were adult males. One still had his horns while the rest had their horns hacked off. It is presumed that the one with the horns intact was shot, wounded and ran away from the poachers. the rhino then died later due to injuries.

 

Borakalalo Game Reserve has lost twelve rhinos to poaching from the beginning of the year.

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Dutch vet fights South African rhino poachers

Dutch vet fights South African rhino poachers | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Every day in South Africa, a rhinoceros will bleed to death after its horn has been hacked off by poachers. The horns are sold on the black market in Asia, mostly in Vietnam, where they’re believed to have powerful medicinal properties. Dutch veterinarian Martine van Zijl Langhout works together with local wardens to try and protect this threatened species.

 

Van Zijll Langhout stalks as quietly as possible through the tall grass at Mauricedale Park in the east of South Africa near the famous Kruger Park. She pulls back the trigger on her special tranquiliser rifle, takes aim and fires. The rhinoceros in her sights wobbles groggily for a few minutes before sinking onto its knees and rolling unconscious onto its side. Van Zijll Langhout and her team, carrying a chainsaw, approach the animal cautiously....

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Keep endangered rhinos in zoos not parks-Prof Kayumbo

Renowed zoologist and conservationist Prof Hosea Kayumbo has recommended that rhinos present in the country will disappear in the near future if they are not kept in zoos to protect them.


Speaking to journalists yesterday Prof Kayumbo said the birth rate of the species was low thus threatening their existence in the future, recommending that they be kept in zoos rather than in parks....

 

In June this year Minister of Natural Resources and Tourism Khamis Kagasheki said that the history of black rhino population in Tanzania and Africa in general has been one of a disappointment, explaining that during the 1960s, it was estimated that there were about 70,000 black rhinos in Africa, of which 10,000 were in Tanzania, the largest concentrations in the continent....

 

He said by 1984, it was estimated that Tanzania's rhino population had been reduced from 10,000 in 1960 to around 3,000. Worse still, said Ambassador Kagasheki, by 1990 black rhino numbers in Tanzania had been reduced by over 97% to less than 100 animals....

 

 

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