What's Happening ...
Follow
Find
32.1K views | +6 today
 
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
onto What's Happening to Africa's Rhino?
Scoop.it!

Eyewitness News: Rhino poaching trial postponed

Police and the South African Revenue Service (Sars) have revealed more information in what is believed to be one of country’s most high-profile rhino poaching cases.

more...
No comment yet.
What's Happening to Africa's Rhino?
So many stories! Here's a quick look at the good, bad, ugly and encouraging RHINO NEWS
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Selling Nature: The Plight of the South African Rhinoceros

Selling Nature: The Plight of the South African Rhinoceros | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

How governments combat poaching as the nature of the crime changes.

 

A South African rhinoceros, once dead, can travel thousands of miles. Under some circumstances, its horn can trek to places as far away as Vietnam and China. Once there, it transforms into a product for spiritual medicine or a sign of wealth and class. Meanwhile, the rest of its body stays rotting in the grass, and its species inches closer to extinction.

 

In 2014, poachers killed a record number of the beasts for their horns, according to official numbers published by the South African government’s Department of Environmental Affairs. The number of rhinoceroses that were killed is triple that of four years ago, and the value of their horns by weight is now greater than that of gold. The complex spiritual roots of this illegal market make it difficult to pinpoint the source or perpetuating causes of it; thus, effective solutions increasingly require strong regulations and governmental commitment....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Zimbabwe: Poachers target rhino calves

Zimbabwe: Poachers target rhino calves | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Harare - Poachers in Zimbabwe are targeting small rhino for their horns, a ranger said on Monday.

 

Two rhino calves were among the five black rhino killed by poachers in the south of the wildlife conservation region Save Valley Conservancy last year, Bryce Clemence of Anti-Poaching and Tracking Specialists (ATS) told Sapa....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

To be successful, anti-poaching efforts must focus on reducing demand

To be successful, anti-poaching efforts must focus on reducing demand | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Although most Americans will never encounter a wild rhino in their lifetimes, the United States has recognized the global threat posed by poaching, the profits of which have been shown to support criminal networks and militant groups throughout Africa. A year ago, the Obama administration announced a "National Strategy for Combating Wildlife Trafficking."

 

The strategy is laudable. It calls for a three-part approach: enhanced enforcement of anti-poaching laws, better international collaboration on the issue and efforts to reduce demand for wildlife products like rhino horn. Unfortunately, this month when the administration announced its implementation plan for the strategy, it undermined its own goals.


The implementation plan calls for the U.S. to devote hundreds of millions of dollars to policing wildlife poaching and trafficking, but it provides virtually no funds for reducing demand, not even in the United States, which has been assessed by some as the world's second-largest market for illegal wildlife products.

 

I'm an economist by training, and I can tell you, if common sense doesn't, that trying to restrict supply without restricting demand is likely only to drive up price. That's how we have spent trillions on drug enforcement with little to show for it....


more...
8A Warit's curator insight, February 24, 8:31 AM

This article about rhino and elephant poaching was taken from MyBroadBand.co.za. It talks about rhino and elephant poaching and being sent to Asia to make medicine. The main idea of this article is about how local and foreign rangers are using drones (UAV) and satellites to take down local poachers which are exploring near the fence and then coming back to poach them after sunset. Also how the rangers are figuring out the poachers' tracks of when they come, kill and then leave. They estimate around 6:30pm to 8:00pm are prime time for killing. 

 

This article helps me understand that poaching is very common thing around the world, but most in Africa because they have a lot of wildlife. When I read this article it made me very sad because I saw this part where it said that approximately 3 rhinos are killed daily and an elephant is killed every 15 minutes(Worldwide). I think this is an excellent way to capture poachers, but I think it can also be improved.

Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Why Americans should care more about rhinos

Chances are a poor farmer in Africa does not care what we Americans think; his next meal is more important to him than racking his brain for an answer to a question of humanity. He needs sustenance, but more than that he needs an incentive. Tourism needs to somehow have a positive impact on his livelihood if we want the rhino to stay alive, if we want to stabilize the wealth of all these impoverished African nations.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

A Rhino's Prayer

A Rhino's Prayer | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Designed by Wendy Sotos a Nikela Volunteer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Rhino horn ‘smugglers’ tried this week

Rhino horn ‘smugglers’ tried this week | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Two Vietnamese nationals will appear in the Kempton Park Magistrate's Court on February 6 court on charges of illegal possession and smuggling.
more...
8B Charlie Capadona's curator insight, February 4, 9:35 PM

This article is about two men stealing a really expensive rhino horn. They were smuggling the horn at Tambo Airport. The police suspected that they were taken at Kruger National Park at the South Africa's border. The police thinks that they stole about 18 horns. Fortunately, they were arrested.

 

When I read this article I thought it was horrible that they stole so many horns on lots of rhino's. I also was kind of mad because the just stole the horn from a national park and that the park should be more protected. But luckily, the two men were arrested. 

 

 

Julia Lee's curator insight, February 8, 9:55 PM

This article is about two Vietnamese who were going to be appear in the Magistrate's court because of illegal possession and smuggling. They caught by the magistrate because of that. This artilcle made me to understand about Afirca more. The reason is, I didn't know that people want rhion's horn. I heared that there are some people caught by illegal possession of ivory, but this is the first time that I heard about rhino. 

Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

A new recipe for saving rhinos: Mix one 8-year-old, 2 dogs, and lots of chocolate

A new recipe for saving rhinos: Mix one 8-year-old, 2 dogs, and lots of chocolate | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Even two-tonne, spike-horned, armor-skinned rhinos need a helping hand sometimes.

 

Fortunately, they can rely on one committed defender: eight-year-old Alyssa Carter.

 

"When I heard that rhinos were being killed, they were my favorite animals and I wanted to start this," says the elementary school pupil. Her campaign, Alyssa's Save the Rhinos, has raised thousands of dollars to protect her favorite animal -- South Africa's poacher-threatened rhinoceros -- and fund an innovative scheme aimed at tracking the hunters who would do them harm....

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Way to go Alyssa!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Namibia Courts to Deny Bail to Rhino Poachers, Minister Says

Namibia is to crack down on illegal rhino and elephant poaching and the country’s courts will deny bail to suspects, Environment and Tourism Minister Uahekua Herunga said.
more...
Sabine Anderson's curator insight, January 29, 11:43 AM

And now for South Africa........!!!?????

Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Namibia to beef up rhino, elephant protection

Namibia to beef up rhino, elephant protection | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
The Namibian government will beef up protection for rhino and elephants and tighten laws to curb increased poaching, which suddenly surged last year, it says.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Make or break year for South Africa’s rhinos after poaching hits record high

Make or break year for South Africa’s rhinos after poaching hits record high | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Despite increased efforts to tackle the surge in rhino poaching, a record 1215 rhinos were killed in South Africa in 2014.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Help Kids Save Wildlife with T-shirts

Help Kids Save Wildlife with T-shirts | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Double Your Donation! Transformation is what best describes what happens to Sheila's Kids. Help provide reward t-shirts to save wildlife.
more...
Sabine Anderson's curator insight, January 24, 8:35 AM

Sheila you are amazing! Thank you!!

Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Suspected rhino horn smugglers arrested in Kruger Park

Suspected rhino horn smugglers arrested in Kruger Park | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Two suspected rhino horn smugglers were arrested inside the Kruger National Park on Tuesday morning, the Hawks said. "[The Hawks] have arrested two suspects allegedly involved in the transportation of stolen vehicles across [the park], smuggling of rhino horns and explosives," said Brigadier Hangwani Mulaudzi. A large sum of money was seized from the men, aged 36 and 39, who were thought to be part of a syndicate. Both men were out on bail for crimes in Mpumalanga and the Eastern Cape. They would appear in the Phalaborwa Magistrate's Court on Wednesday.  -Sapa 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Make poachers pay a high price for slaughter of wildlife

Make poachers pay a high price for slaughter of wildlife | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Bella could be anyone. Bella could be a young girl named after the lead character in the popular Twilight movies, but she is not.

 

Bella is a northern white rhino in Uganda's Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary and she is every bit as popular as the Twilight character, only with all the wrong people.

 

No one wants to follow Bella on Facebook or Twitter, ring her name in bright lights, or shower her with awards; instead, poachers want her dead, so they can harvest her priceless rhino horn....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Biologist aims to grow rhino horns to save animals from poachers

Biologist aims to grow rhino horns to save animals from poachers | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Seattle-based biotechnology startup that hopes to grow rhino horns in a laboratory says it has already produced a batch of rhino horn powder.

 

The first batch of powder was primarily protein-based and didn’t have any genetic components of a rhino, said Matthew Markus, a biologist and CEO of Pembient.

 

He took some of the chalky, greyish powder to Vietnam, a major consumer of rhino horns and its products, to see how regular users react to it. “I wanted to see whether or not (the powder) matched with what they were using for smell and texture … people were generally receptive.”...

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Hmm! Could this be the long term solution to save the rhino from poachers? Moving on to elephants and even lions?

Would put a real damper on those who'd like to see the trading of rhino horn legalized.... not to mention lion breeders/canned hunting industry who sell lion bones!

more...
Sabine Anderson's curator insight, February 28, 1:32 PM

Wouldn't that be fantastic?

Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Drones, satellites, and maths take down poachers in South Africa

Drones, satellites, and maths take down poachers in South Africa | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
drones, combined with other more established technology tools, can greatly reduce poaching — but only in those areas where rangers on the ground are at the ready to use the data gathered
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Journalists Reporting on Rhino Poaching in Mozambique Charged with Trespassing, Invasion of Privacy

Journalists Reporting on Rhino Poaching in Mozambique Charged with Trespassing, Invasion of Privacy | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Mozambique filed charges against a pair of international journalists in connection with an investigation into the poaching of rhinoceroses.

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, Batholomaeus Grill, a correspondent for the German weekly Der Spiegel, and Torbjoern Selander, a Swedish freelance photographer, were apprehended while reporting in the village of Mavodze on Feb. 16. Villagers accused to two of being spies, taking them to a police station where they were held for hours...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Teams unaware of wildlife smuggler tactics

Teams unaware  of wildlife  smuggler tactics | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Bangkok  - Front-line transport workers largely lack awareness on how criminal networks disguise illegal wildlife products, it emerged at a summit in Bangkok. Customs officials and wildlife trade experts say that educating freight forwarders and handlers of air, ship and land cargoes could
more...
8A Warit's curator insight, February 10, 8:23 AM

This article about elephant and rhino poaching was taken from BBC. This article talks about how poachers and smugglers sneak wildlife into Asian countries such as China, Vietnam and Thailand, etc.. This article also talks about how many Rhinoceros and Elephants die each year in the world(mainly Africa). The South African government say that poaching of Rhinos have reached 1,215 last year. Wildlife organisation say around 35,000 elephants are killed every year just for their tusks.


This article helps me understand that animal poaching is increasing rapidly and how much profit these poachers and smugglers are receiving. African countries and the world are losing these near-to-extinct animals. When I read this I felt hatred in my heart as well as sadness because animals are dying for only their horns and tusks while these heartless poachers are happy with their money. I wish they would find a better job than this, even though I know that this gives them quick money, there are better jobs out there.

Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

KZN would-be rhino poachers arrested

KZN would-be rhino poachers arrested | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Two suspects have been arrested after an intelligence-driven operation by Durban Organised Crime Unit and Special Task Force in KwaZulu-Natal.
more...
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Conservationists meet in Kenya to discuss rhino protection

Only five white rhinos remain on the planet, three in Ol Pejeta Conservancy in central Kenya and two in zoos in the Czech Republic and the United States.

 

"The battle is to work out what is feasible scientifically in the short time still available to us," Ol Pejeta Conservancy chief executive officer Richard Vigne told AFP.

 

The five remaining northern white rhinos are all elderly or incapable of natural reproduction, so artificial reproduction offers the only hope of preventing extinction....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

S. Africa moves 100 rhinos in fight against poaching

S. Africa moves 100 rhinos in fight against poaching | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
South Africa said that it had moved around 100 rhinos to unspecified neighbouring states as part of efforts to stem the illicit slaughter of the animals for their horns.
Home to around 80 per cent of the global rhino population, South Africa is at the epicentre of a poaching crisis. Government...
more...
Sabine Anderson's curator insight, January 29, 11:41 AM

If this is true it might be a good thing but where have they gone are these animals actually going to a safer place? Will their survival be guaranteed?

Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Botswana leader blames Asian market for increase in animal poaching

Botswana leader blames Asian market for increase in animal poaching | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Botswana President Ian Khama on Monday said that the Asian market was to blame for increase in poaching activities in the Southern Africa region. Speakin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Second South Florida man nabbed in illegal trade of rhino horns

Second South Florida man nabbed in illegal trade of rhino horns | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
An antiques dealer has agreed to pay $1.5 million in fines in hopes of winning a lighter sentence for trafficking in endangered rhino horn, elephant ivory and protected coral.
more...
Sabine Anderson's curator insight, January 24, 8:32 AM

If he can pay so much in fines how much is he making.........he needs to face the full might of the law and be locked up for good!

Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Rhino poaching hits record high in South Africa... again!

Rhino poaching hits record high in South Africa... again! | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Driven by unquenched demand for horns, illegal gangs are gunning down rhinos in some of the country's best protected parks
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

VIDEO: Will cycles 15,000 miles in aid of rhino charity

VIDEO: Will cycles 15,000 miles in aid of rhino charity | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
A Ballymena man has cycled 15,000 miles over a 184-day period to raise money and awareness for wildlife charity Save the Rhino.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Could Kunene rhino deaths be Symptomatic of Namibia's bigger problem?

Could Kunene rhino deaths be Symptomatic of Namibia's bigger problem? | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
The Save the Rhino Trust (SRT) has launched an internal investigation after the Board was presented with a letter mid-December outlining possible collusion between some staff members and poachers who have killed at least 17 critically endangered Kunene black rhinos since late 2012. The crisis at the SRT is, however, just part of a larger one in anti-poaching law enforcement and natural resource management in the so-called ‘Big Three’ communal conservancies - Palmwag, Abenab and Sesfontein - in Namibia's southern Kunene. By JOHN GROBLER.
more...
No comment yet.