What Librarians Need to Know
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Educational Leadership:Reading: The Core Skill:Every Child, Every Day

Educational Leadership:Reading: The Core Skill:Every Child, Every Day | What Librarians Need to Know | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner. Our 175,000 members in 119 countries are professional educators from all levels and subject areas––superintendents, supervisors, principals, teachers, professors of education, and school board members.
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What is Education 3.0

Education 3.0

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page . Education 3.0 describes a level of transformative capabilities and practices for education in the 21st century. The work of Prof. James G.

Education 3.0 is a term that has been used to describe a level of transformative capabilities and practices for education in the 21st century.

 

Professor Derek Keats, of the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa,[1] and his co-author Jan Philipp Schmidt, FreeCourseWare Manager at University of the Western Cape, South Africa, used the term in 2007 to apply to the use and impact on education of collaborative and personalized learning, reusable learning content, and recognition of prior learning (RPL) whether by formal or informal means.

 

Keats' explorations were focused on higher education.[2] Dr. John Moravec at the University of Minnesota broadens this view, and describes Education 3.0 as a product necessary to support what he labels "Society 3.0" - a near future paradigm of social co-constructivism, ambient technology, and propelled by continuous innovation at all levels of society.[3]

 


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Jillian Zuber's curator insight, May 2, 2013 12:57 PM

Interesting...

Bill Weigall's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:38 PM

One possible imminent future...

Jeffrey Miles's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:01 PM

The idea of web 2.0, and education 3.0 is interesting to me... what will they be called in the future if they are to become the norm?

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This Is What Happens When A Kid Leaves Traditional Education

Please subscribe us and Fallow at https://www.facebook.com/realwomanrealman/ Logan Laplante is a 13 year-old boy who was taken out of the education system to...
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Has Education arrived in the 21st Century yet?

Has Education arrived in the 21st Century yet? | What Librarians Need to Know | Scoop.it

This interesting table, comparing 20th and 21st Century learning, was conceived by William Rankin, a well credentialed doctor of Education from ACU, Texas.

 

This graphic, which I found on Educational Technology and Mobile Learning, was originally published on iThinkEd in 2007, where you can read Rankin’s full thoughts that led to his creation of this table.

 

What’s fascinating for me is the fact this was written 7 years ago. It doesn’t date the message. It challenges us as educators to reflect on how far we have actually progressed.

 

I started hearing the talk about 21st Century Learning back in the 90s and here we are in 2013 and, looking at this chart from Rankin, we have to ask ourselves; for all the talk and planning, have we really moved out of the 20th Century and embraced what this nebulous concept of 21st Century is really about?

 


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Chelsie DeBus's comment, May 8, 2014 4:35 PM
I do agree with Katie that is it scary that education as we know it is going to start changing. It is really scary to think that the American people don't like change but it is happening all the time with education. There are pros about this education change and there are cons. Let's take the cons and turn them into pros.
Alex Salazar's curator insight, May 12, 2014 9:09 AM

This is an article about whether education has made it online.

Fiona Free's curator insight, June 16, 2014 6:49 AM

might be interesting 'work' to get staff to do the research and come up with their own table and add a third colunm.....what they do or could do...

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Online Education Infographic - Computers or Campuses?

Online Education Infographic - Computers or Campuses? | What Librarians Need to Know | Scoop.it

It is not surprising that more and more schools are offering degrees earned entirely online, or that more and more university students are enrolling in web-based courses. The Computers or Campuses? Infographic displays the growth and statistics of online education and presents the pros and cons... http://elearninginfographics.com/online-education-infographic-computers-or-campuses/


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Kyle Kohn's curator insight, May 7, 2014 9:20 PM

It is not surprising that more and more schools are offering degrees earned entirely online, or that more and more university students are enrolling in web-based courses. 

Margaret Silhasek's comment, May 9, 2014 3:12 PM
This is kind of sad. I feel like half the point of college is the experience, and it is sad knowing that colleges and students are starting to turn to web based learning now. I prefer the face to face classroom and lectures and it's scary thinkingr that my college experience may not include that.
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A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: 22 Great Places If You Teach Research Skills

A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: 22 Great Places If You Teach Research Skills | What Librarians Need to Know | Scoop.it
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Top 10 Future Technology That Exist Today

You can watch Top 10 Future Technology That Exist Today videos from my channel address. If you enjoyed this just click the subscribe button for more videos r...
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Skills matter but we mustn't neglect the education in further ...

Skills matter but we mustn't neglect the education in further ... | What Librarians Need to Know | Scoop.it
Diminishing the focus on education in favour of skills to plug economic needs will do long-term damage to the young people we serve, says college principal Ian Pryce.
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The concept of special education

The concept of special education | What Librarians Need to Know | Scoop.it
Special education teachers teach students who have physical or mental disabilities and thus have special needs.

 

Special education teachers teach students who have physical or mental disabilities and thus have special needs. They are a lifeline to children with special needs since children with special needs are constrained in their learning process because of their disabilities. It is just because of the special education teachers that they acquire the basic skills in education and life overall, and may learn to live independently. Special education teachers adapt the general education curriculum to suit the unique needs of each student. 

 

Thus, special education is a lifeline for those students who have special needs. They personally take care of the special needs of the students by modifying or changing the curriculum accordingly to the extent of disability, wether mild or moderate. With students having severe disabilities, they tend to teach such students basic skills so that students with disabilities can lead their lives independently and teach them basiccommunication skills and mathematics. 

Special education teacher assess the strengths and needs of each student and set their teaching goals accordingly. They help develop Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), which outlines the kind of education each student with special needs will receive. Special education teachers need to be calm, patient, organized, inspiring and accepting. Special education students can come with a varying degree of disabilities and from various backgrounds.

Special education teachers, hence, have to be understanding and have very effective communication skills, as special education students have difficulty in conveying their needs and ideas. Special education teachers help the students with special needs to feel comfortable in social situations and be aware of socially acceptable behaviour. 

Preparing the special education students for life after school is an important part of the work of special education teachers as they teach their students some basic skills which help them to live independently. Thus, special education teachers are doing a great service to the nation by catering to the needs of students with disabilities and help them live a near normal and dignified life. 

For More Information on Special Education,
http://www.schoolanduniversity.com/articles/special-education ;


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Michael Sigrist's curator insight, May 8, 2014 11:34 AM

It is great to have special education teachers and you can't thank them enough for the job they do in turning around somebody's life. Education is a big part of kid's future, and special education teachers give everyone a fair chance to succeed in life. 

Michael Carl's curator insight, May 11, 2014 8:27 AM

This article talks about the importance of special education teacher.

Luke French's comment, May 11, 2014 9:07 PM
Special education teachers are, as Michael said, invaluable. These teachers make nigh-unfathomable differences in these children's lives, and, in my opinion, do not receive due credit.
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Webinar - Staff Technology Skills: Creating a Learning Environment - 2013-10-31

How can you foster an environment in which staff have the technology expertise necessary to help patrons achieve their goals? Watch as we talk with Mick Jaco...
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