What are the effects of parents who push their child into sports
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Deranged Social Identity

Deranged Social Identity | What are the effects of parents who push their child into sports | Scoop.it
Dylan Scales's insight:

When children recieve tons of good feedback from parents and coaches, they begin to feel they have to excel in their sport even if they are disinterested in it. So, pleasing the parents is the childs main goal. This mindset begins to make the child believe that his athletic performance and achievement defines himself as a person. Now, after this mindset has been program has been wired intp the child's brain, any minor mistakes are servere blows to the childs self-esteem and how he looks and feels about himself. They believe pleasing their parents and having outstanding performances are more important than enjoying the game itself. Kids can enjoy sports and other activities competitively but, when a child comes home crying because he made his first error of the year in his baseball game, that is when a parent should step in and resolve the problem their child is having. 

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Injuries

Injuries | What are the effects of parents who push their child into sports | Scoop.it
With more kids than ever in organized sports,  experts in sports medicine and youth athletics say they are increasingly concerned about the pressures put on young children to excel at sports.
Dylan Scales's insight:

Putting aside psychological effects, physical injuries are becoming a bigger problem in sports, especially with children. A recent survey stated more sports related injuries are being reported more than car accident injuries. Americans ages five to twenty-four are most likely to be treated by a health professional. Children five to fourteen have the highest risk, 59.3 injuries per one thousand people. That is slightly higher than people ages fifteen to twenty-four. But, significantly different from people ages twenty-five to  fourty-four and fourty-five and up. A fifth of kids have missed one or more school days, because of sports related injuries. When children know their parents will feel proud of them when doing well in sports, they may go past their limits and hurt themselves just to gain the approval of their parents. Some injuries children can develop are things like "Little League" elbow from overthrowing and stress fractures from so much training.

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Heidi Moreno's curator insight, December 2, 2015 8:53 AM
This article raises a lot of questions about who much is too much for kids?
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Prevention of Negative Effects

Prevention of Negative Effects | What are the effects of parents who push their child into sports | Scoop.it
Dreams of multimillion-dollar contracts, Olympic glory and college scholarships have many parents pushing their children harder than ever to play sports.
Dylan Scales's insight:

When Parents Push their children to participate in sports, it has long term effects on them. In order to prevent this from happening, you have to let your child decide what they want to participate in. If your child has a passion for a sport, make sure you go easy on them and let them quit if they feel it is not an enjoyable activity for them anymore. Also, to prevent the long term effects on your child's health, it is imperative to provide guidence for your kid by listening to and observing their needs while showing them a huge opportunity for other activities as well. Parents need to make sure they stay away from seeing their child as their own personal achievement, because they are gifted at a sport. This will cause you to want them to keep playing reguardless of them having fun while doing it. let children follow their own path of interests.

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Altered Parent-Child Relationship

Altered Parent-Child Relationship | What are the effects of parents who push their child into sports | Scoop.it
'No nagging' and other helpful rules for parents
Dylan Scales's insight:

A good parent-child realtionship is key for a child to be sucessful in life. So, when kids are always traveling to get to their next sporting event, their relationship with one or both parents may become distant. This could be the saddest and most significant of all of the problems with pushing your child in sports. These problems will cause children to become less apprecaitive of their parents and not seek them for advice. Also, kids become less motivated when a parent who they have not built a strong relationship with is not around. Being less motivated could possibly make the child disinterested in the sport, so they give it up, because they don't have that drive inside of them anymore. Parents should cheer on their child and hope the best for them, but not take it too far that their child want's to avoid them and become disinterested in the sport.

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Self-Esteem Issues

Self-Esteem Issues | What are the effects of parents who push their child into sports | Scoop.it
Dylan Scales's insight:

When parents push their children too hard, they develop self-esteem issues. Them most important thing to children is to hear posotive feedback from their parents in anything. So, when parents keep doing this, children start to feel that the only thing that matters is how they perform on the field. As they go through high school, children start to believe that the only thing that matters in your social identity is how they perform on the playing field. When children feel that the only thing that matters is doing well on the playing fields, they begin to gain a drive to be in the limelight and stay there. So, the child may start to play the games as if it is only about them, not about the team. This could lead to a disastrous turnout of them developing problems with their teammates. All of this will lead to a big frown on your childs face when playing sports.

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