What are some of the effects of internet piracy?
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What are some of the effects of internet piracy?
Piracy has always been a problem for property holders, but especially over the past decade. “Since the inception of the law regulating creative property, there has been a war against ‘piracy.’(Ch.4 Piracy)” It seems as though every few weeks we see something in mainstream media about piracy and how rights holders are trying to protect their hard work. In fact, just recently Sony and Disney decided to legally stream movies that were still in theaters in order to slow down piracy of some of their films. They only decided to do this in some parts of Asia, so it is yet to be seen how it will influence audiences in the US. Though, one thing that can be certain about piracy is it takes away money from content creators and many others. The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) has found extreme losses in jobs and money because of online piracy. They completed a study finding piracy causes the loss of over 373,000 jobs and $16 billion dollars in employee earnings (IFPI publishes Digital Music Report 2013). Another study by the Institute for Policy Innovation found “annual harm at $12.5 billion dollars in losses to the U.S. economy as well as more than 70,000 lost jobs and $2 billion in lost wages to American workers (Who Music Theft Hurts).” The number of jobs lost by piracy stands out to me as the most amazing statistic. However, those statistics can be difficult to report accurately, so it is important to take that information with a grain of salt. The video game industry and music industry are also greatly affected by piracy. However, last year, a report by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) found the overall music industry revenue rose by 0.3 percent in 2012 (IFPI Publishes Digital Music Report) despite piracy. The numbers would probably be higher if it weren’t for piracy, but it’s still nice to see an increase in revenue despite how easily one can pirate music. Piracy has become such an issue for some businesses that many have been pushing for multiple bills, mainly SOPA and PIPA, to be passed by Congress which would give the copyright holders extreme power over their work. SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) was in the news about a year ago, and although it failed to pass the House, many are still pushing for the bill to be reintroduced to Congress. However, right now it seems the bill would need more steam to pass, despite support from companies like Time Warner, CBS, and Viacom. If businesses want to stop piracy of their content, they are probably going to have to figure out something unique. When websites like “thepiratebay” make it so easy to pirate content, it really is hard for companies to stop piracy. Whatever approach they may take, it should be in their best interest not to make the consumer’s angry. After all, they are the ones who purchase the products, and if they don’t like what businesses are offering, then they support them by buying their merchandise.
Curated by Matt Mochol
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Sony and Disney begin streaming movies still in theaters in a bold move against piracy

Sony and Disney begin streaming movies still in theaters in a bold move against piracy | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it
In a bid to limit movie piracy in Asia, Disney and Sony have quietly begun testing a bold new on-demand service in South Korea which offers movies to rent while they are still playing in theaters....
Matt Mochol's insight:

Recently, two big film studios have tried a new idea to help stop piracy of their movies. Being able to watch a movie via stream that is still in theaters is a big move for these companies, even if it is just in some parts of the world. Although theaters are still relevant today, what would happen to them if movie studios decided to use this model in the US? More than likely less people would go to theaters, and then they would start to lose money. Piracy could destroy the movie theater business, and thousands of people would start to lose their job. This is certainly not going to happen anytime soon in the US, but it shows how far companies will go to maximize thier profit. Legally streaming movies online can certainly be the way of the future for some companies.

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Unlocking Your Cell Phone Shouldn't Be a Crime! - Reason.com

Unlocking Your Cell Phone Shouldn't Be a Crime! - Reason.com | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

"American consumers should not face jail time for unlocking their cell phones. This should not be a matter of criminal or copyright law. Instead, it should be addressed by contract law. If a consumer is not bound by a contract, he or she should be able to unlock his or her phone. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), as it pertains to this issue, unnecessarily restricts consumer choice and is a case of the government going too far. Fortunately, there’s a simple solution: a permanent exemption from the DMCA for consumers who unlock their mobile devices.”

Matt Mochol's insight:

Over the past few years, the ability to unlock one's cell phone has been fiercely protested by the media and cell phone users alike. Unlocking a cell phone gives the user the ability to use it on a different carrier than it was meant to be used as. However, it also allows the phone to download many applications for free, usually including a free music application. It seems as though one should be allowed to use a phone on whatever carrier they choose, but certain carriers won't allow this. Downloading applications for free is the main cell phone pirating action. It is a big reason why carriers and phone providers don't allow for the unlocking of cell phones.

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How YouTube Fights Copyright Infringement

How YouTube Fights Copyright Infringement | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

"So how accurate is the system? According to a 2009 study of YouTube's audio fingerprinting technology, it's quite robust. While Content ID doesn't work in all cases (though we should stress that is has been improved upon over the last three years), it is quite adept at identifying content from various reference files.

Likewise, with its video fingerprinting technology, YouTube tends to identify and assign policies to lots of content very quickly.

In December 2010, YouTube announced that more than 100 million videos had been claimed under Content ID and that more than 4 million reference files existed to identify content."

Matt Mochol's insight:

YouTube has too become affected by online piracy because it is such a popular website. People can easily download music or other videos straight from YouTube, so the site has to start fighting back. Thousands of videos are uploaded to the site everyday, so the odds of one of some of them being copyrighted is probably going to be high. When YouTube does check videos, it has to make sure it is accurate in taking down the copyrighted content. YouTube has been the center of lawsuits before, and I think I speak for everyone when saying it is almost always best not going to court.

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The Battle Over Music Piracy

The Battle Over Music Piracy | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

"Can consumers be trusted to control their own music without pirating the record labels and the artists they produce right into the ground? The answer is yes. People have been buying and selling music for years without DRM, in a form you may have heard of called the compact disc. CDs have never had DRM attached. Off the record, most executives--on the technology side at least--will tell you that DRM is a dinosaur that's waiting for the asteroid to hit. It's just a matter of when the music industry will stop assuming its customers are all criminals."

Matt Mochol's insight:

The music industry definitely doesn't trust the customers as much as they used too, but they have a reason not to. It's hard to trust the consumers when piracy is as prevalent and as easy as it is. That's a big reason why online music stores, like Apple's iTunes, issued DRM (Digital Rights Management) on its music. About five years ago one wouldn't be able to play music bought on iTunes with anything but an Apple product. Apple has obviously changed their perspective on DRM, but with piracy becoming such an issue other companies may look to DRM for their piracy answers.

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Antonio Abbatiello's curator insight, October 11, 2014 12:00 PM

I liked this article because it speaks about peoples responsibilities and why the music industry has to stop assuming that all consumers are criminals. This is a reliable source because it was published in Time magazine and the author has not only written for Time magazine, he also has written for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and many others. 

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What Is SOPA?

What Is SOPA? | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it
If you hadn't heard of SOPA before, you probably have by now: Some of the internet's most influential sites—Reddit and Wikipedia among them—are going dark to protest the much-maligned anti-piracy bill.
Matt Mochol's insight:

Piracy has begotten to be such a big issue that a serious piracy bill has been brought up and introduced in Congress multiple times over the past couple of years. So far it hasn't been passed, partly because big websites like Reddit and Wikipedia have voiced their displeasure for it. One of the big concepts in the bill is the ability of the copyright holder to tell the government to take down a website that holds their movie, music, or whatever copyrighted material. Opponents say the bill limits freedom of speech and also limits flow of information on the internet.

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In Piracy Debate, Is the Sky Falling?

In Piracy Debate, Is the Sky Falling? | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

"In a letter in December [2011] announcing its support for stronger antipiracy legislation, the motion picture association said that “$58 billion is lost to the U.S. economy annually due to content theft, including more than 373,000 lost American jobs, $16 billion in lost employees’ earnings, plus $3 billion in badly needed federal, state and local governments’ tax revenue.” A spokesman for the association, Howard Gantman, said the $58 billion figure came from an economic model that estimated piracy’s impact on a range of tangentially related industries — florists, restaurants, trucking companies and so on."

Matt Mochol's insight:

Some of these numbers that the MPAA found out may seem a bit ridiculous and unrealistic, but I think the point they are making is piracy is taking away bunch of money from a lot of different people. Although, I don't really think the MPAA should be giving information like this to Congress or businesses to persuade to stop piracy, because it is extremely hard to get accurate data on some of these issues. Although, this is what they have found when they conducted their research, they the right to publish their data. The MPAA is affected so much by piracy, and they don't feel it is fair, which it really isn't.

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Pirate Bay Celebrates 9th Anniversary, a Brief History | TorrentFreak

Pirate Bay Celebrates 9th Anniversary, a Brief History | TorrentFreak | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

"Despite numerous court cases, court-ordered blockades by ISPs and two full trials at the Stockholm Court, The Pirate Bay remains one of the 100 most visited websites on the Internet. Quite a remarkable achievement.

As for the future? It is expected that legal pressure will continue. It wouldn’t be a surprise if The Pirate Bay’s domain names are seized in the coming year. But whether that will bring the deviant site to its knees is doubtful."

Matt Mochol's insight:

Without a doubt the most well-known website to pirate content from is none other than thepiratebay. It has repeatedly overcome legal pressure to shut down its domain, and is well known throughout the world. It has been kicked out of numerous countries and yet it is still one of the most visited websites in the world. It really shows the will of "pirates" especially if they site goes down. If it does, one will almost instantly learn about it if they are active on social media because people will surely be talking about it. The pirate bay can be viewed as the hub of piracy. If one needs to find something, people all over the globe have the ability to help out.

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Video game piracy: Is it good for business? - CNN.com

Video game piracy: Is it good for business? - CNN.com | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

"What's changed is simply the scale of the problem and the increasingly desperate measures publishers are taking to halt piracy's spread.

For software creators, stemming the tide of online downloads is a mounting concern. In the old days, precious few could access "elite" bulletin board system dial-ups or FTP online download sites full of pirated software. Today, the Internet provides millions with instant access to new, and in some cases unreleased, titles for all game systems on demand."

Matt Mochol's insight:

As technology and internet users become more "tech-savvy", one of the biggest industries affected by piracy is video games. People that play their video games on the PC are more exposed to piracy because it is easier for them to share their games as opposed to people who play on Xbox or Playstation. It's harder for players on the Xbox to pirate games than PC players. Wherever one chooses to play their video games, piracy is still going to hurt the publishers of the video game. That's why popular multiplayer video game titles often come with online codes. The initial purchaser of the game has an online code, but if they choose to sell their game to someone else, they would have to repurchase an online pass to get the most out of their video game. This ensures some profit for the publisher if one decides to sell their video game to someone else.

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NQ Logic: Content vs. Platform: The Battle of the Titans

NQ Logic: Content vs. Platform: The Battle of the Titans | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

"Many studies have pointed out that piracy has been driven essentially by three main factors: scarcity, price, and cheap alternatives. Delaying legal availability of the content outside the US drives overseas consumers to piracy [Wellesley College, Department of Economics, Jan 16, 2012], but more importantly universally fixed prices are deterrent in general [Would you pay US$136 for a Tron Legacy DVD in Mexico?]."

Matt Mochol's insight:

The intuitive reason why people pirate is because of price. No one wants to pay for something that they can get for free. It's relatively easily, and it seems harmless doing it. No one thinks they are going get arrested or sent to jail for pirating a movie or a song. Another popular item to pirate is video games, especially when they aren't yet available in the US, but they are in other regions of the world. Maybe if video game companies decide to release games on the same date worldwide, their overall piracy number would go down.

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Internet Pirates Will Always Win

Internet Pirates Will Always Win | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

"In the arcade version of Whac-A-Mole, the game eventually ends — often when the player loses. In the piracy arms-race version, there doesn’t seem to be a conclusion. Sooner or later, the people who still believe they can hit the moles with their slow mallets might realize that their time would be better spent playing an entirely different game."

Matt Mochol's insight:

When will piracy end? Can it ever end or just be slowed down? It really doens't seem to be ending anytime soon, so the question is how can it be slowed down? Different companies have different attitudes when it come to slowing down piracy, but it seems as though "pirates" always find a way to get what they want. Whatever direction the music industry, movie industry, or any another media industry goes by when they think about stopping piracy, they should realize that it is nearly impossible too eliminate it completely.

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TV and Film Piracy: Threatening an Industry?

TV and Film Piracy: Threatening an Industry? | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

“Would the college student watching the pirated movie download have otherwise seen the movie in the theater, subscribed to Netflix or bought the DVD?” Rose told Forbes. “Would the person buying a pirated DVD at a Chinese market actually have bought the genuine article otherwise?  The answers to such questions are hard to determine.  But it does seem fair to assume that not every pirated copy of an audiovisual work represents lost revenue to the content producer.”

Matt Mochol's insight:

A common argument of pirates is that they wouldn't have bought the item anyways even if they couldn't have pirated it. It's hard to tell what people would do if they can't pirate music or movies, but it's difficult to say that they would for sure purchase the item legally. Maybe they would go to a friend's computer who did purchase it, and get it from them. Whatever they may do or not do, industries have a hard to reporting figures from piracy because of this.

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IFPI publishes Digital Music Report 2013

IFPI publishes Digital Music Report 2013 | What are some of the effects of internet piracy? | Scoop.it

"Global recorded music industry revenues rose by an estimated 0.3 percent to US$16.5 billion in 2012, the first year of industry growth since 1999. Digital revenues saw accelerating growth for the second year running, up 9 percent, with most major digital revenue streams - downloads, subscription and advertising-supported - on the rise."

Matt Mochol's insight:

Despite all of the articles, reports, and information from the media about music piracy, the music industry still saw a global increase in revenue in 2012. Albeit, if there was no piracy of music at all, then we would probably see higher revenues and more artists would be making more money. But, this can probably be seen as great news for the music industry in general. The music industry is still making a profit despite how easily people can pirate music. 

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