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Rescooped by Maricarmen Husson from xposing world of Photography & Design
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How Magazine Covers Have Changed Over the Past 100 Years

How Magazine Covers Have Changed Over the Past 100 Years | What about? What's up? Qué pasa? | Scoop.it
How have magazine covers and their photos changed over the past century? The answer sheds light on not just the design and image choices of major media com

Via Xposedbydesign
Maricarmen Husson's insight:

 Portadas de revistas y sus  cambios a través del tiempo. La respuesta ilumina no sólo el diseño y la imagen.

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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

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This Louisiana radio station likes their news 'en Franglais'

This Louisiana radio station likes their news 'en Franglais' | What about? What's up? Qué pasa? | Scoop.it
For more than half a century, one small commercial radio station has been keeping French alive in the bayous of Louisiana.

Via Seth Dixon
Maricarmen Husson's insight:

Durante más de medio siglo, una pequeña estación de radio comercial ha mantenido el Francés vivo en los pantanos de Louisiana.

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Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 22, 7:24 PM

Unit 3

Since 1953, this small radio station located in Ville Platte has been working to make sure the French speaking population in Louisiana does not deplete anymore; going from about one million in 1960 to less than 200 thousand in 2010. The station is interactive receiving calls from people sharing stories of their childhood and old memories that relate to the word or phrase of the day.

 

I think this is a great way to preserve the culture and common language of a community in a fun, interesting way that will keep listeners "tuned in" for years to come.   

Alex Lewis's curator insight, March 23, 10:07 AM

This radio station is promoting the cultural history or Louisiana. Louisiana was originally French,  but was given to America in the 1700s. Most people in Louisiana could speak French fluently. Now, only roughly 175,000 native speakers are present. KVPI speaks in French and English, which keeps the French language alive in Louisiana.

                                        -A.L.

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, March 23, 11:47 PM

In Ville Platte, a small, most French speaking town in Louisiana, a radio station, called KVPI (Keeping Ville Platte Informed), is trying hard to keep the language alive. Since French was banned from the classrooms in the 1920s, the decline of the unique Louisiana dialect has increased. KVPI speaks in a combina of English and Louisiana French in hopes to fight the downward trend and pass on the language to many more generations.

 

This is article is related to cultural patterns and processes through folk culture and language, by addressing these issues and the attempts to solve them. The traditional language of the area, which is part of the folk culture, is being replaced by the common language of the country as a whole, English. The English language has been spread with pop culture across the world through globalization and the smaller languages and cultures are often lost in the switch. KVPI has made it their goal to defend against that, so the unique folk culture of Louisiana will continue.