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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


Via Seth Dixon
RobersonWG's insight:

The article and video clearly speaks for itself.  How would such a tragedy impact you, your family, and your friends?  Why do you think this is happening?  Why do you think it continues or will continue to happen in places throughout the world?  

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Evelyn's curator insight, January 14, 5:37 AM

Girls should not be gone just because they're girls. Boys and girls are equal, girls shouldnt be treated different than boys because we are both equal. if girls were gone completly then they wont be able to have kids and family. imagine if your mom was abandoned just because she is a girl. how would that make you feel? 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 7, 7:30 PM

The way the people of China and India treat baby girls is upsetting. India and China eliminate more girls than the number of girls born every year in America; that is disturbing to think about. When a couple decides to have a child they should own up to the responsibility and take care of the baby despite the gender. I know of several people who adopted Chinese female children, luckily they had a chance at life, unfortunately, not many baby girls in China or India have that chance.  

                                                                                 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

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Create your own Scoop.it account by "Sign Up" at the top.  Choose the line "I don't have a Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn account". Create your account by entering your real name (no nicknames or you will not get credit), your email address, etc.  Check your email to see if the email verification was sent to you by Scoop.it.  Once you receive it go ahead and set up your page. "FOLLOW" my page.  You are allowed to Scoop any of my articles.  Watch the tutorials and get familiar with how to Scoop articles.  

 

Your assignment for this week is to find two articles and Scoop them/add them to your page.  When you scoop them you are to add your own ONE PARAGRAPH (5-7 sentences) comment.  

 

Option #2 - If you have difficulties setting up your page you are to Scoop two articles from this page and email your one paragraph summary/comments to me at robersoner@lisd.net.  

 

Your page is to be set up/article comments emailed by Monday, January 13th (Silver) or Tuesday, January 14th (Maroon) including your two Scooped articles and comments.  

 

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Rescooped by RobersonWG from The Geography of Mexico
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Mexico City Wants to Become the Next Times Square

Mexico City Wants to Become the Next Times Square | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it
Mexico City's government is trying to transform one of the world's largest cities by beautifying public spaces, parks and monuments buried beneath a sea of honking cars, street hawkers, billboards and grime following decades of dizzying urban growth.

Via Tony Burton
RobersonWG's insight:

Mexico City is seeking to change.  Do you think it is possible for the city to experience positive growth despite the impact of the drug trade that has plagued its country for years?  Why?  Why not?

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Sherryn Kottoor's comment, January 13, 7:00 PM
I agree with @Vivica Juarez. This is a great opportunity to improve Mexico's infrastructure and show the beauty of the city. Although the drug war will continue, hopefully this will help decrease the amount of drug trade.
Isela Lopez's comment, January 13, 7:05 PM
I think this is great for Mexico. After so much time of struggling I think a change is needed. Making the scenery more pretty will definitely attract more tourists which will bring more money to the country, improving the Economy. Although I believe the drug trade really can't be stopped because of how dangerous it is, this could possibly be a new start and a distraction from all the bad things happening in the country.
Rachel Cho's comment, January 13, 9:21 PM
I agree with @Vivica Juarez because of the drug trade issue. People will never stop because they WANT to do it and they're addicted to this process by now, which is sickening.
Rescooped by RobersonWG from News on Latin America
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Colombians Take to the Streets to Support Ousted Leftist Mayor

Colombians Take to the Streets to Support Ousted Leftist Mayor | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it

December 14, 2013 — Thousands of people gathered in Bogota's main square on Friday night to support the Colombian capital's leftist mayor Gustavo Petro, who was ousted this week for trying to fire private contractors.

 

Petro, a former member of the M-19 rebel movement, has also been barred from elected office for 15 years by Colombia's inspector-general, a conservative ally of former President Alvaro Uribe.

 


Via meetAnthony.com
RobersonWG's insight:

What do you think?  How have the people exercised their right to protest the government?  Did it work?  Why or why not?

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Spencer Levesque's curator insight, January 13, 2:49 PM

The people have the right to throw out their maypr for trying to hurt their government. Imagine you parents are the mayor and you are the people. Your parents have hired people to help you get more money, then your parents try to fire them. You have the right to speak up to them. If you were the one of the people in Bogota, Columbia would you stand up to someone who is trying to ruin your economy? 

Rescooped by RobersonWG from News on Latin America
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Exposed: The CIA's Clandestine Operations in Colombia

Exposed: The CIA's Clandestine Operations in Colombia | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it

December 22, 2013 — Since the early 2000s, the CIA has been secretly helping the far-right Colombian government torture, spy on, and kill at least two dozen members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in a covert program with a "multibillion dollar black budget" approved by Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, according to aWashington Post investigative report published Saturday.


Via meetAnthony.com
RobersonWG's insight:

Why do you think this is happening?  If you lived in Colombia right now, how would you feel?  How could this impact you and your family?

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Rescooped by RobersonWG from Geography Education
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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


Via Seth Dixon
RobersonWG's insight:

The article and video clearly speaks for itself.  How would such a tragedy impact you, your family, and your friends?  Why do you think this is happening?  Why do you think it continues or will continue to happen in places throughout the world?  

more...
Evelyn's curator insight, January 14, 5:37 AM

Girls should not be gone just because they're girls. Boys and girls are equal, girls shouldnt be treated different than boys because we are both equal. if girls were gone completly then they wont be able to have kids and family. imagine if your mom was abandoned just because she is a girl. how would that make you feel? 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 7, 7:30 PM

The way the people of China and India treat baby girls is upsetting. India and China eliminate more girls than the number of girls born every year in America; that is disturbing to think about. When a couple decides to have a child they should own up to the responsibility and take care of the baby despite the gender. I know of several people who adopted Chinese female children, luckily they had a chance at life, unfortunately, not many baby girls in China or India have that chance.  

                                                                                 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

Rescooped by RobersonWG from Geography Education
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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


Via Seth Dixon
RobersonWG's insight:

This is a VERY interesting article that correlates with what we learned about Spatial Inequality/Income Gap in Latin America.  In your summary take note of the drastic differences in the neighborhoods.  If you lived in those areas what would life be like for you, how would you adapt, how would this impact you and your family.

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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 4:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 5:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

Rescooped by RobersonWG from The Geography of Mexico
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Life expectancy and infant mortality: how does Mexico compare to other countries? » Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

Life expectancy and infant mortality: how does Mexico compare to other countries? » Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it

How long do Mexicans live? The 20th century brought dramatic increases in longevity. From under 30 years at the beginning of the century it rose to 38 by 1930.

From there it went up to 50 by 1950 and reached 62 by 1970. By 2000 it was 72, almost double the 1930 value. Women live longer than men. Life expectancy for Mexican women is about 78; that for men is roughly 73 years. In the future Mexican longevity is expected to increase at about 2.5 years per decade. This is not as rapid as in the past but still significant.


Via Tony Burton
RobersonWG's insight:

What does Mexico's growth in life expectancy and decline in infant mortality say about the country's infrastructure or lack thereof?  How has it changed over the years?  Do you think it will continue to increase or decrease?  Why?

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Ross Caddy's curator insight, January 13, 2:23 PM

I can't believe how young Mexicans were dying back in the early twentieth century.  I assume the population has increased along with the life expectancy.  Due to the fact that it is increasing by 2.5 years per decade, people are going to be living pretty long within a few decades.  I think that along with the life expectancy on the rise that Mexico's infrastructure is going to improve over the course of time.  This is a good thing for the people of Mexico and can be for the U.S. and Canada, because Mexico will be able to trade and purchase more goods.

Zarrin Bashir's comment, January 13, 6:35 PM
I think the country's infrastructure and the overall progress of Mexico is improving. Since the life expectancy has been getting higher there, it must mean that they are improving the living conditions of the country. In order for a country to have high life expectancy and less infant mortality , the country must have a lot more medical improvements and hospitals. According to the statistics in the article , Mexico's life expectancy and infant mortality changed for the better. I think it will continue increasing , since the conditions must be improving there.
Trinidad Millan's comment, January 13, 7:06 PM
The decline in infant mortality, and growth in life expectancy means that Mexico's infrastructure is improving. It has changed greatly over the years. Before, Mexico used to lack sanitary hospitals, and was very corrupt. Now, the rates of life expectancy have changed and less people are dying. As more people are born, the population of Mexico will increase. It will increase I'm size because, the better the infrastructure, the better the living conditions. Which in the near future, could mean lower death rates in the country.
Rescooped by RobersonWG from News on Latin America
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Venezuela Led Region in Poverty Reduction in 2012

Venezuela Led Region in Poverty Reduction in 2012 | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it

December 6, 2013 — The United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) reports that Venezuela and Ecuador led the region in decreasing poverty in 2012.


Via meetAnthony.com
RobersonWG's insight:

Would you want to move to Venezuel now?  Why or why not?  Use only evidence from the article?  Back your opinion up with facts. 

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Ross Caddy's curator insight, January 13, 2:36 PM

I would not move to Venezuela.  While it had the largest poverty reduction, the article still said that the poverty percentage is 23.9%, which is still high.  I like how the poverty is improving, but I have a good thing going here.  68 million people are still in extreme poverty in the region.  That is very high, and I wouldn't move to that type of place now or ever.

Ana Camila Bravo's curator insight, January 13, 3:25 PM

      Thanks to this article, I now don't want to move to  Venezuela.  I thought this country was a nice place to go to ,but now know about the infant mortally rate..From the article it says a way of how they are trying to fix it.  As well as simply reducing poverty, the GM Hijos de Venezuela reduces gender inequality. 98 percent of the recipients of the program were women, who are in many countries in Latin America overrepresented among the poor. It can be reasonably hypothesized that this high level of targeting is likely to increase the economic independence of women, reducing the frequent economic imperative for women to stay in disadvantageous relationships.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 4:56 PM
I definitely wouldn't move to Venezuela now, due to the facts from this article. Although I am impressed that they are trying to reduce the level poverty, it is still too high to take chances. There is still 28% of the regions population that is considered poor. "Out of those, 68 million of them are in extreme poverty." This is crazy to think that so many people are living in such horrible conditions. A lot of the people they helped in the mission trips were woman, 98% to be exact. Who knows if one of them could be me if I were to move there?
Rescooped by RobersonWG from News on Latin America
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San Salvador from the Air (Photos)

San Salvador from the Air (Photos) | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it

December 16, 2013 — The online periodical El Faro today published a collection of 48 photos of San Salvador and surrounding municipalities taken from the air.


Via meetAnthony.com
RobersonWG's insight:

As you view the images of San Salvador, use what you learned in Human Geography to explain what their life is like.  I should only see terminology from our unit on Human Geography (i.e. overcrowded, formal region, functional region, overpopulation, life expectancy, population pyramid, etc.)

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Daniela salinas's curator insight, January 9, 4:22 PM

San Salvador has many pretty nice and clean places. But others aren't so pretty. Their sewage drains in some parts aren't connected so all the dirty water is just flowing down in some kind of polluted waterfall, full of garbage sitting there destroying the soil. It's infrastructure is highly developed in certain areas but in others its very low. It's packed in some places  home made of scrap metal, then in others it's a beautiful green scenery.  

Jessica ❤️'s curator insight, January 12, 1:32 PM

I think life expectancy will be low for the people on the side where is poor. Since the government doesn't do anything on trying to help them out. there is over population as you can see in the picture. People walking around where they have to go.  It's a less developed place since there is  building but it seems that there isnt enough space for people.

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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.

Via Seth Dixon
RobersonWG's insight:

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:38 AM

Over time you can see some countries population increase, decrease, and stay about the same over the years. As more countries develop population increases in these areas. Some data showed Nigerias population to increase along with the United States. It also showed Japans to stay about the same or even decline. 

CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2013 8:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 2:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

Rescooped by RobersonWG from Geography Education
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Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it

"For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life.There are over 7 billion people on the planet, a massive number that paints an image of human life sprawling densely over the planet...humans are unevenly distributed across the planet, leaving some areas that are densely populated and others that are largely void of life."


Via Seth Dixon
RobersonWG's insight:

As you review the resource map noting the locations of the emptiest and most crowded places on Earth, take note on where these places are located.  What do you see?  Why do you think they are crowded or uninhabitable?  What are your thoughts?  What amazed you?

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Samantha Tovias's curator insight, January 12, 11:39 PM

What this article states is that in some places of the world it's crowded with a lot of people and there's not much space. People struggle to find places to live without being really close to ones neighbor. They also have to struggle over  job opportunities. Due to this they struggle with poverty and the places they are at aren't so clean. This is because people make a lot of trash and where there's many people there is a lot of trash. Therefore it's not so sanitary and they have to deal with lack of space and sanitation.

 

On the other hand, in some places of the world, there is much space to be inhabited by humans. But it's basically free land because no one lives there and there's no building occupying it. But this land could be used for many things such as building neighbor hoods, buildings, and business. Sometimes it's good to have that land free from everything because that way when there's really a reason to use it we can just go back to it with no worrys. Just as long as we don't use up too much land it should be fine. We also need to know how to control how much nature we use up. Because its also not healthy to have a lot of pollution with no trees to cleanse our oxygen. That's a hazardous precaution us humans should take.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 13, 3:30 PM

The most amazing conversation I had in Jamaica was with a musician who had traveled the world as I have. He worried about the crowding in Asia. We talked about the uneven distribution of space. I like peering down from a plane while traveling over the west ( in America) lots of white spaces on the map.

Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 4:18 PM

Well some places, such as deserts, are really hot, dry, barren and devoid of life; mostly because it's impossible to build anything on such soft ground. While places such as Texas has really dry and hard ground perfect for building foundations.  Then there's the amount of resources in that area, I.e. Water, food, tree, etc.,  and many other factors that contradict if it's inhabitable.

Rescooped by RobersonWG from Geography Education
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Santas Around the World

Santas Around the World | Pre-AP World Geography | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.

Via Seth Dixon
RobersonWG's insight:

Check out this map and article to see how the rest of the world views Santa Claus!

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Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 5:10 PM
This was definitely an interesting reading. I believe @Spencer Levesque had a very good point. They all have similar features, but are different in little ways. And who would of thought someone came on New Years too?
Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 7:23 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries precieve Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country perceives him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 7:28 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries perceive Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country precieves him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.