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Geographic Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2014 1:53 PM

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles, these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, “two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.” The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” (trailer) and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” (trailer) both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is not appropriate for the K-12 classroom viewing).


Tags: place, spacesport, California, landscapevideo, popular culture, music.

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NOVA: Earth From Space

NOVA: Earth From Space | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Gedetailleerde satelietbeelden ontsluiten het syteem van verbindingen die het leven op aarde in stand houden.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 17, 2013 4:34 PM

"Earth From Space is a groundbreaking two-hour special that reveals a spectacular new space-based vision of our planet. Produced in extensive consultation with NASA scientists, NOVA takes data from earth-observing satellites and transforms it into dazzling visual sequences, each one exposing the intricate and surprising web of forces that sustains life on earth."


This documentary shows something interesting for the physical geographer, human geographers, and geospatial technology specialists.  In other words, this touches on just about all things geographic (with cool images!).  The overarching theme is that so many things in this world that we wouldn't imagine are actually interconnected with excellent examples. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples, physical.

Kenneth Holzman's comment, February 17, 2013 7:37 PM
Thanks so much for this link! I'd completely missed this on PBS, and it is EXACTLY the kind of video I'm trying to get my AP Human Geography students to watch right now. This is getting shared with ALL my kids ASAP. :-)
dilaycock's comment, February 18, 2013 4:02 PM
I just love that Scoop.it allows resources to be shared so easily, and in a manner that is so accessible to students everywhere. Thanks Kenneth.
Rescooped by wereldvak from Edelin's Geaography
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Containerisatie vormde Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

 


Via Seth Dixon, Edelin Espino
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Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:45 AM

I believe this video is very interesting. It tells us that everything we have today is thanks to globalization and the reason we have it so fast is because of shipping containers! In the video it told me that before my time it was impossible to get swordfish from Japan or cheeses from France, but now thanks to globalization it is all possible. Globalization is even behind the reason how our phones were made! 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:28 AM

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today.  This is a very useful video.