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25 jaar na val van de muur is Duitsland nog steeds een tweedeling

25 jaar na val van de muur is Duitsland nog steeds een tweedeling | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.

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16s3d's curator insight, November 4, 2014 2:11 AM

On efface pas 40 ans d'histoire en 25 ans, ni même en 40...(?)

Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 6, 2014 11:43 AM

50 years of communist rule still affect opportunities in Germany today, as these maps show. What they don't show is the social mirror that each provides to the other and the rich discussions about social policy that result. Reunification has been an expensive exercise for Germany, however one that it is committed to.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 6:20 PM

Info for paper potential paper topic

 

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Kanaal door Nicaragua....doen?

Kanaal door Nicaragua....doen? | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Dwars door Nicaragua....van Atlantische naar de Pacifische Oceaan een kanaal aanleggen. Gekkenwerk? Slecht idee! Hier vind je redenen waarom je dat niet zou moeten doen. 


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 17, 2014 1:42 PM

In my opinion this shouldn’t be done because that lake is the source of the Nicaraguan drinking water. For the economy of the country this canal can be a big help as well as for china but if it mean taking away their water supplies then this is not a good idea. But I guess that the world is changing and china with a better route of shipping will be a good thing for our society.  

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 3, 1:50 PM

Just as I finished scooping the past article dealing with this topic, I scroll down and see this story. I had to read it. I wanted to learn more about such a disastrous plan to build a canal. In return I found out that the plan has yet to be revealed. I most certainly do not change my opinion which I firmly expressed in my last scoop, in regards to this canal being idiotic.

An issue that stood out in this article deals with the Nicaraguan government not holding bids for the job and HKND walking out on top. It seems as if a few backdoor deals concerning a lot of money were made. Bold assumption I know... but so is assuming a canal will be built in Nicaragua! Ba-Zing

I am also interested in learning the credibility of HKND. It seems like an interesting company which is most certainly intertwined somehow with the Chinese Government. How else would an individual, Wang Jing,  come up with the 40 billion dollar purse to pursue this project. 

The potential environmental issues are infinite and effect other environments, both near and far geographically speaking, in a variety of negative ways. Its good to see a team of experts coming together to investigate the canals effects on the area. 

Lastly, the article clearly states how there is no need for the canal due to the Panama Canals newest developments and improvements. The canal can accommodate larger barge's thus increase trade and revenue. 

THe Nicaragua Canal is not a good idea.  

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 6, 3:26 PM

The Chinese want to compete with the US on overseas trading and to do so they want to build their own canal through Nicaragua to rival the Panama Canal to the south.  This will lower the quality of Nicaragua’s drinking water but will greatly bolster the economy. If Nicaragua gets the opportunity to possess a major canal that can fit trader ships previously unable to fit through the Panama Canal this will be great for the people. Nicaragua has a very low country ranking so any economic support that this canal can generate will improve the living conditions of the inhabitants. 

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Mexico: immigratie nieuwe trend

Mexico: immigratie nieuwe trend | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Europa te lastig en China te duur is Mexico een alternatief."


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 1:01 AM

I just finished reading a scoop about how violence in Mexico is getting worse. Because of that, people choose to emigrate from Mexico. This is pretty accurate especially from Europe because most manufacturing experience come from Europe and the United States (at least the eat side). However, that doesn't stop a good amount of mexicans immigrating north to live a different economy.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 3, 12:25 PM

While reading this article I found it quite interesting to hear that Mexico is now where immigrants and others want to migrate towards. Prices are going up in China and other countries allowing for Mexico to become more competitive and attract more people towards it. Over the years migration has all been towards America but today the numbers are decreasing and more people are migrating towards Mexico because of the opportunities available there and the land that is emerging.

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 9:21 PM

Even though this article is now three years old, it is refreshing to see that Mexico is really making their mark on the global market. The Global North seems to be coming to a stalemate while "up and coming countries" like Mexico are becoming the perfect place for people to begin their businesses and have a fresh start on life. I can understand though, how it was mentioned on the third page of the article, that some locals may feel that foreigners, European especially, may be receiving some type of special treatment due to past colonialism. However, these entrepreneurs are shaping the economy of Mexico. This is Mexico's chance to advance in the world and increase its GDP. Young, aspiring moguls all seems to feel the same way about their homelands, "Europe, dying; Mexico, coming to life. The United States, closed and materialistic; Mexico, open and creative" and Diego Quemada-Diez, a Spanish director, was quoted in the article, "Europe feels spiritually dead and so does the United States...[y]ou end up wanting something else".  And apparently, Mexico has that "something else".

 

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Containerisatie vormde Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

 


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 1:58 PM

This video proves how a simple idea has the potential to change the world. The truck driver had the insight to notice when the current shipping system was not particularly effective and had the ingenuity to do something about it. Because of this man, containerization was allowed to change how goods could move around the world. As goods move, they also spread different cultures through food, ideas, technology, and beliefs. Without this process, globalization would not be at the level that it exists at today. . 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 7, 2014 5:26 PM

I always enjoyed TED videos. What really struck me was the opening sentence of the video, "everything is everywhere these days." This is so true in so many ways. The video uses different examples that you can find in different stores from places all over the world. How many things can you could in your bedroom that says "Made in China" or some other place other than the US? This is very common as we all know. Products and goods come from all over the world and even over seas. This is a process that we call globalization. However, the video introduces a process called containerization. This process saves an ample amount of time for the workers. The process was a success. "shrinking the world and enlarging human choice."

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Groter dan het Empire State Building. Geen optie dus om door het Panamakanaal te gaan. Daarom gaat Venezuela een groter kanaal bouwen om schepen van deze omvang niet om te laten varen via de punt van Zuid- Amerika. Prachtig voorbeeld van de enorme schaalvergroting die plaatsvindt.


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 8, 2013 3:52 AM

The Worlds biggest ship to be launched soon by Shell is an amazing feat, created by human ingenuity. It is incredible that it is longer than the Empire state building. it is difficult to imagine how an object so long even moves by itself. Nicaragua is attempting to make a canal Bigger than Panamas to support a ship thate size of the prelude that will operate off the coast of Australia for the next 25 years. The fact that it needs to be towed to its destination makes one question if its really a ship or not. Regardless Shell will share the cost of the Oil vessell once its finished being built

Julia Rose Turco's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:02 PM

Wow, this is interesting! I can't believe its that long! I wonder how long it took them to build it? Also, where is it going?  Also, why would they need it to be so big? Why can't they just use a smaller ship and make more trips? But overall this is very cool.

Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:34 PM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.

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Wat er van Mexico te leren is

Wat er van Mexico te leren is | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics.


Via Seth Dixon
wereldvak's insight:

Er zijn meer Mexicanen die de VS verlaten dan er binnen komen. Het gaat goed met Mexico. De economische groei is groter dan die van de VS en Brazilië!

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:18 PM

The facts about the "new" Mexico help in reasoning why less people are migrating.  The new Mexico looks hopeful and prosperous but when you read about the affects of the drug wars and violence, we see that there is still room for progress for the country in order to keep their citizens from leaving Mexico.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 5:17 PM

A few weeks ago, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics. That’s how you work toward the building of agreements. Unfortunately, it wasn't Barack Obama. It was Mexico’s Enrique Pena Nieto. One of the first things Pena Nieto did after assuming office was to announce a pact for Mexico, an ambitious set of reforms to raise taxes, increase competition and take on the teachers’ unions. While the world has gotten used to a torrent of images and news of drug-related violence from Mexico, another side of this country has been quietly developing. What we can learn from Mexico is that they are quite successful.  Mexico’s GDP is expected to grow by nearly 4 percent this year, twice as fast as Brazil or, for that matter, the United States. It is riding a manufacturing boom. Mexico is now the world’s fourth biggest producer of cars, according to the World Trade Atlas. Starting next year, new taxis in New York City will carry a “made in Mexico' label.” Mexico is also the world's top exporter of flat screen TVs. In fact, Mexico exports more manufactured products than all the other countries in Latin America combined. A major factor that comes into play is geography.  Sharing a border with the United States means heavy products are cheaper to transport across than if they were manufactured in, say, Asia. Nieto continues to inform us what we can learn from Mexico.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 8:37 PM

The title of this article was what enticed me as I was hoping to find an actual answer. However, based on this article alone, I don’t actually think there is much the United States can learn from Mexico about politics or economics.

 

This author failed to mention that a difference in political systems could also attribute to the new Mexican leader’s ability to obtain “endorsements from across the spectrum.”  Unlike the United States, Mexico has a “spectrum” of political parties because of the proportional representation in their legislative branch. Under this type of system more than two political parties emerge as dominant and as such the candidates can run less on party line and more on what the candidate believes. Our system, the “winner take all system,” elicits a more polarized two party system.  The fact the Mexican government doesn’t have to deal with such staunch party lines (which have become ridiculously polarized over the past few years) is a huge reason for why the new leader can actually get things done and Obama can’t.  (Robert A. Daul, “How Democratic is the American Consituation?,” 103-118).

 

I also see little to glean from the manufacturing route that Mexico is on at the moment. I will admit that the projected GDP growth of 4% mentioned in the article is impressive. However, thinking that the key to economic growth in the United States is through a similar “manufacturing boom” is just out of touch with the times. As stated in class our wages can’t keep up with the cheaper wages of developing countries (a point the author eluded to in the section discussing “the three main factors at play,” factor number three). Thus, doing what Mexico is doing doesn’t fit the American economy. What the United States might try doing is finding a manufacturing niche that no one has a market on in order to obtain more jobs. Maybe something higher end or medically related would be of benefit to the United States. Even these jobs would end up comprising a small part of the United States economy because the United States is more of a white collar economy. As such, more should be done to protect that sector of our economy given its relevance to our modern economy.

 

 Overall, I think the media’s quick comparisons of other countries falls under the bad category of globalization. A fair amount of people would just use this article to say things like, if Mexico’s leader can do X Y & Z than so should Obama. Yet, many of those people wouldn’t actually think about all the differences or reasons why Obama can’t compromise or revert the economy backwards. Am I saying Obama shouldn’t try more or that I am happy with the lack of compromise by all, no. However, I think it is dangerous for journalist to gloss over the situation since many people will take them as a credible source to cite. Mind you not all journalism is bad though. The Scoop.It article I read this week regarding Walmart is a great example of how investigative journalism can have positive consequences. The major difference being one actually did their homework that cited concrete specifics, while the other made a flimsy analogy.  

 

* Apparently the theory of Mexico's government may not be as simple as I though given our class discussion. Still the politics of Mexico is clearly different given how long the state was under a one party system.