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Hoeveel Europese landen passen er in Brazilië?

Hoeveel Europese landen passen er in Brazilië? | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 11, 6:56 PM

This is a funny map to look at. It takes the country of Brazil and places all of Europe inside of it! I never realized Brazil was so big and it puts that into perspective when its equivalent to all of Europe like this. You do not think about Brazil being this big just because it is on a different continent than Europe but I liked looking at it this way.

NatalBrazil's curator insight, February 17, 10:53 AM

Interesting Graphic about Brazil and Europe

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 19, 8:53 PM

That is a whole lot of potential culture in one country.  

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22 Internationale grenzen

22 Internationale grenzen | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Brazilië (boven) en Bolivia (beneden)."


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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:52 PM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 2014 10:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:11 AM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

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Mooie foto's van onze aarde

Mooie foto's van onze aarde | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, June 15, 2014 8:58 AM

Amazing.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:33 AM

unit 1

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Meanderende rivier

Meanderende rivier | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?