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25 jaar na val van de muur is Duitsland nog steeds een tweedeling

25 jaar na val van de muur is Duitsland nog steeds een tweedeling | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 8:05 PM

These two maps (unemployment on the left and disposable income on the right) are but two examples in this article that highlights the lingering distinctions between the two parts of Germany that were reunited 25 years ago.  The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin  Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 


Tags: Germany, industry, laboreconomichistorical, politicalborders.

16s3d's curator insight, November 4, 2:11 AM

On efface pas 40 ans d'histoire en 25 ans, ni même en 40...(?)

Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 6, 11:43 AM

50 years of communist rule still affect opportunities in Germany today, as these maps show. What they don't show is the social mirror that each provides to the other and the rich discussions about social policy that result. Reunification has been an expensive exercise for Germany, however one that it is committed to.

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2e WO zorgde voor een cartografische revolutie

2e WO zorgde voor een cartografische revolutie | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."


Via Seth Dixon
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 10:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:59 PM

APHG-U1

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2:06 PM

Whenever there is war, Americans want maps.  They want to know about where conflict is, how far away from home it is, and why people are being sent to the places they are being sent.  With the new map ideas in World War II from Harrison maps were made to better display distance and direction to people.  He used different projections in areas.  He also drew maps from different places, for example what does Japan look like when you are in Siberia.  Transforming flat maps back to having some sort of global shape was exactly what we needed to get away from the old outdated unreliable style of maps.

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Grenzen binnen en van de VS in animatie

30-seconden animatie van de historische grenzen van de VS, 1629 - 2000. .


Via Seth Dixon
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Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 6:36 PM

This video does a fantastic job of showing how the United States has expanded and grown since its original 13 colonies. While many today might imagine that our nation was simply always this size in fact over many years of colonization, land purchases and land grabs America has eventually become what it is today.

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Wereld: cultuur verspreiding vanaf 600v Chr, in 5 min

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


Via Seth Dixon
wereldvak's insight:

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

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Hongsheng Li's curator insight, August 11, 3:47 AM

5分钟讲述文化历史

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 10:47 AM

APHG-U3

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

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Holland vs the Netherlands

"What's the difference between Holland and the Netherlands?"


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Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 5, 2013 10:03 AM
This is awesome! Learn something new everyday!
Brett Sinica's comment, April 22, 2013 8:56 PM
I have seen this video previously, and this being my second time, it is much easier to understand this time around. He tells the story of one great kingdom and all areas that are under its control or influence. With the expansion of many European countries within the last couple centuries, I can understand how people can get culture and people mixed up, even though they’re from the same place to begin with. It reminds of the Arabs, or Arabic people. They don’t necessarily come from one country or one language or one religion. They represent a vast group of people and each of them differ or relate in certain ways. At times understanding these different groups can be a challenge, but in the end that is what makes them more unique and interesting.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 3:54 PM
Well this video was fairly interesting actually. Funnily enough, my Canadian friend made me watch the Great Britain video about a month ago and so when I saw this was made by the same person and I always seem to confuse Belgium/Netherlands/Holland it seemed like something I should think about doing. The video was very informational and the narrator went over many factual things including the simple question of: Where is everything? The video mainly focuses on physical geography of people but also goes on to explain that the ‘Dutch’ living in the Caribbean are actual ‘Europeans’ because they belong to the Kingdom of the Netherlands which belongs to the European Union which by the transitive property makes them Euros.

I liked what Brett said, that cultures and groups of people typically get categorized together as one when they really aren’t and it is important to acknowledge their distinctions and understand the different groups and cultures of people.