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Hoe 'crisis mapping' helpt bij hulpverlening in Nepal

Hoe 'crisis mapping' helpt bij hulpverlening in Nepal | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
A team of Nepalis, backed by groups around the world, are helping guide what aid is needed where by "crisis mapping" Nepal, reports Saira Asher.

 

Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 8, 10:16 AM

Crisis are a symptom that something underneath the surface of normalcy is terribly wrong ... especially when we come to realize that everything is interconnected, even politics—worldwide.

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Mooie foto's van onze aarde

Mooie foto's van onze aarde | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:33 AM

unit 1

Sally Spoon's curator insight, June 2, 4:01 PM

Really cool to look at. Interesting to use as writing starters.

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Overstroomde Elbe in Wittenberg

Overstroomde Elbe in Wittenberg | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

De ergste overstromingen sinds de Middeleeuwen voor delen van Duitsland.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 12, 2013 2:25 PM

If you having been following the news lately, central European countries such as Germany and Poland are experiencing major flooding right now.  Compare this image above to one where the Elbe isn't flooding and you'll quickly be able to visualize extent of the flooding.


Tags: Germany, remote sensing, disasters, environment, geospatial.

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Astrobleme

Astrobleme | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Lake Manicouagan lies in an astrobleme in central Quebec covering an area of approximately 1206 square miles—an area half the size of Delaware. An astrobleme is a scar left on the Earth’s surface from an impact of a meteorite. Lake Manicouagan is the result of one of the largest identified asteroid or comet impacts on Earth. In the middle of the lake, on Rene-Levasseur Island, Mount Babel rises 3,123 feet into the air.

 

Lake Manicouagan is thought to have formed about 212 million years ago plus or minus 4 million years.  This happened when an approximately 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid crashed into Earth toward the end of the Triassic period. Some scientists speculate that this impact may have been responsible for the mass extinction that wiped out more than half of all living species."


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 18, 2013 8:33 PM

This amazing picture shows how vulnerable the earth is to space born hazards.  This 3.1 mile-diameter asteroid might have caused 1/2 the living species on the earth at that time, 212 million years or so ago, to become extinct.  Man has the abilty to adapt to changes to the environment, unlike the dinosaurs.  The question is though do we have the ability to adapt to an event of this magnitude?  Hopefully we will not have to test out this question.

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Grenzen binnen en van de VS in animatie

30-seconden animatie van de historische grenzen van de VS, 1629 - 2000. .


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Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:36 PM

This video does a fantastic job of showing how the United States has expanded and grown since its original 13 colonies. While many today might imagine that our nation was simply always this size in fact over many years of colonization, land purchases and land grabs America has eventually become what it is today.

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Hoe wij de aarde veranderen, in 15 'before-and-after' beelden.

Hoe wij de aarde veranderen, in 15 'before-and-after' beelden. | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
We've dammed mighty rivers, built hundreds of artificial islands, and made the world's fourth-largest lake disappear.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 12:26 PM

This article highlights 15 classroom-ready examples of environmental change that can readily detected with satellite imagery.   See these 25 from NASA's Earth Observatory for more.


Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 8:47 AM

Transforming the planet in massive scales.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 10:02 AM

Summer reading KQ2, How have humans altered Earth's environment? key concepts- remote sensing, land use

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Geografie een sociale studie of....

Geografie een sociale studie of.... | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Recent news stories discussed why geography is important to an informed and engaged society.  To those of us in the geospatial profession, basic geography education is an essential foundation to encouraging young people to enter the workforce in surveying, photogrammetry, GIS and other disciplines in our field."
 

Geldt ook in de Nederlandse situatie, Daar is ook dringend behoefte aan technisch en geografisch geschoolden. GEO-ICT. Toch staat geografie te boek als een sociale studierichting waardoor de GEO-ict beroepen te weinig in beeld komen. Ligt dit aan de sector zelf of aan de indeling?


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 8:00 PM

In a world of information the knowledge of geography is lacking.

Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 2014 10:43 PM

Defining "geospatial" is still a convoluted mess.

Nick Smith's curator insight, September 9, 2014 12:31 PM

The government is hurting geography education

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Meanderende rivier

Meanderende rivier | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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NOVA: Earth From Space

NOVA: Earth From Space | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Gedetailleerde satelietbeelden ontsluiten het syteem van verbindingen die het leven op aarde in stand houden.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 17, 2013 4:34 PM

"Earth From Space is a groundbreaking two-hour special that reveals a spectacular new space-based vision of our planet. Produced in extensive consultation with NASA scientists, NOVA takes data from earth-observing satellites and transforms it into dazzling visual sequences, each one exposing the intricate and surprising web of forces that sustains life on earth."


This documentary shows something interesting for the physical geographer, human geographers, and geospatial technology specialists.  In other words, this touches on just about all things geographic (with cool images!).  The overarching theme is that so many things in this world that we wouldn't imagine are actually interconnected with excellent examples. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples, physical.

Kenneth Holzman's comment, February 17, 2013 7:37 PM
Thanks so much for this link! I'd completely missed this on PBS, and it is EXACTLY the kind of video I'm trying to get my AP Human Geography students to watch right now. This is getting shared with ALL my kids ASAP. :-)
dilaycock's comment, February 18, 2013 4:02 PM
I just love that Scoop.it allows resources to be shared so easily, and in a manner that is so accessible to students everywhere. Thanks Kenneth.