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Geographic Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2014 1:53 PM

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles, these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, “two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.” The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” (trailer) and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” (trailer) both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is not appropriate for the K-12 classroom viewing).


Tags: place, spacesport, California, landscapevideo, popular culture, music.

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Kanaal door Nicaragua....doen?

Kanaal door Nicaragua....doen? | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Dwars door Nicaragua....van Atlantische naar de Pacifische Oceaan een kanaal aanleggen. Gekkenwerk? Slecht idee! Hier vind je redenen waarom je dat niet zou moeten doen. 


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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 3, 1:50 PM

Just as I finished scooping the past article dealing with this topic, I scroll down and see this story. I had to read it. I wanted to learn more about such a disastrous plan to build a canal. In return I found out that the plan has yet to be revealed. I most certainly do not change my opinion which I firmly expressed in my last scoop, in regards to this canal being idiotic.

An issue that stood out in this article deals with the Nicaraguan government not holding bids for the job and HKND walking out on top. It seems as if a few backdoor deals concerning a lot of money were made. Bold assumption I know... but so is assuming a canal will be built in Nicaragua! Ba-Zing

I am also interested in learning the credibility of HKND. It seems like an interesting company which is most certainly intertwined somehow with the Chinese Government. How else would an individual, Wang Jing,  come up with the 40 billion dollar purse to pursue this project. 

The potential environmental issues are infinite and effect other environments, both near and far geographically speaking, in a variety of negative ways. Its good to see a team of experts coming together to investigate the canals effects on the area. 

Lastly, the article clearly states how there is no need for the canal due to the Panama Canals newest developments and improvements. The canal can accommodate larger barge's thus increase trade and revenue. 

THe Nicaragua Canal is not a good idea.  

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 6, 3:26 PM

The Chinese want to compete with the US on overseas trading and to do so they want to build their own canal through Nicaragua to rival the Panama Canal to the south.  This will lower the quality of Nicaragua’s drinking water but will greatly bolster the economy. If Nicaragua gets the opportunity to possess a major canal that can fit trader ships previously unable to fit through the Panama Canal this will be great for the people. Nicaragua has a very low country ranking so any economic support that this canal can generate will improve the living conditions of the inhabitants. 

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 4:53 PM

Form the perspective of the Nicaraguan Government, this project is a chance to get ahead economically regardless of the consequences to the environment and its population. As the article mentions, this is the second poorest country in the region, but the project could triple the economy's growth and strengthen employment. As a government leader who wants to be a more powerful country, a few causalities on the quest to economic prowess is nothing.  Especially because the government doesn't really have any other alternative ways to expand the economy that quickly with so much potential success. 

 

I think this project is part of a common trend seen throughout this class. When I read this it reminded me of the workers safety video in which Chinese companies let their employees jump on a crane without safety gear in order to cheaply complete a project.  Or how China allows their factories to run despite the mass pollution the industry is causing. It isn't like China is the only country to ever cut corners either. Before the US and Europe become switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, these countries employment laws and environmental laws were horrible (some could argue they still are actually). One of the scientist in this article, Myers, even touched on this point by saying he "there’s a touch of hypocrisy in outsiders from industrialized countries preaching environmental purity." Hypocritical or not, I really wish countries would learn the harm that came from the actions past industrial societies took to get ahead. Although, given the government's stance on this project, I really don't think that was the lesson learned. 

 

As a citizen of Nicaragua this is incredibly worrisome.  Their is the potential that the ecosystem is disturbed, which would have  many unpredictable consequences. Furthermore, the drinking supply could be destroyed. Since this area is already poor, the families of this area would have a hard time just up and leaving their homes. So for the sake of the citizens, I really hope that if the project moves forward there won't be many adverse complications. 

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Wereld: cultuur verspreiding vanaf 600v Chr, in 5 min

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


Via Seth Dixon
wereldvak's insight:

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

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Hongsheng Li's curator insight, August 11, 2014 3:47 AM

5分钟讲述文化历史

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 10:47 AM

APHG-U3

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Groter dan het Empire State Building. Geen optie dus om door het Panamakanaal te gaan. Daarom gaat Venezuela een groter kanaal bouwen om schepen van deze omvang niet om te laten varen via de punt van Zuid- Amerika. Prachtig voorbeeld van de enorme schaalvergroting die plaatsvindt.


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 8, 2013 3:52 AM

The Worlds biggest ship to be launched soon by Shell is an amazing feat, created by human ingenuity. It is incredible that it is longer than the Empire state building. it is difficult to imagine how an object so long even moves by itself. Nicaragua is attempting to make a canal Bigger than Panamas to support a ship thate size of the prelude that will operate off the coast of Australia for the next 25 years. The fact that it needs to be towed to its destination makes one question if its really a ship or not. Regardless Shell will share the cost of the Oil vessell once its finished being built

Julia Rose Turco's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:02 PM

Wow, this is interesting! I can't believe its that long! I wonder how long it took them to build it? Also, where is it going?  Also, why would they need it to be so big? Why can't they just use a smaller ship and make more trips? But overall this is very cool.

Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:34 PM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.