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Territoriale aanspraken in de wateren rond China: een overzicht

Territoriale aanspraken in de wateren rond  China: een overzicht | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
China has recently increased its pursuit of territorial claims in nearby seas, leading to tense exchanges with neighboring countries. A map of some of the most notable disputes.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2014 11:36 AM

Many of the geopolitical conflicts in the East Pacific have their roots in the territorial disputes over islands that at first glance seem as if they wouldn't be worth the trouble.  However, since the the UNCLOS agreement gives countries 200 nautical miles off their coasts to be an Exclusive Economic Zone, that greatly enhanced the strategic value of controlling these islands.  This interactive map briefly highlights some of the details behind the conflicts with links for further readings.  


Questions to Ponder: Why do countries care so much about some minor islands?  Why would other countries not want to accept China's territorial assertions?  Experts are saying that Chinese-Japanese relations are as bad as they've been since the end of World War II--Why all the commotion? 


Tags: borders, political, conflict, China, East Asia.

Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 1:07 PM

Another key article regarding the ongoing disputes of the South China Sea - this article, when paired with our later discussion of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, will help us understand why this issue will be increasing in importance in the coming year.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:33 PM

(East Asia topic 4)

Though international politics are nothing to be taken lightly, this scenario resembles that of children drawing on a chalkboard and fighting for the space on their sides (or maybe it's just me since this happened a lot in my elementary school...). I admit that there seems to be no one right way of solving these disputes, but perhaps a god starting point would be a historical stance: Who found an island first? Which nation first used it? How historically significant is a place to each country?  Those islands which lie outside the EEZs or which there is no clear primary holder could be made into a jointly-managed zone, in which each country with a legitimate claim shares equal profits and usage of the resources. Though nations will argue that they don't want such a settlement, it may end up being beneficial, since one particular place may turn out being much more profitable than another one nearby. So even if China were to inherit 90% of these islands and territory, theoretically a large amount of oil or gems could be discovered in the other 10%, making aggression a bad move over a sharing compromise.

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Breuken in Xinjiang : mooi strike-slip voorbeeld

Breuken in Xinjiang : mooi strike-slip voorbeeld | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Colliding continents and cracks in the Earth’s crust make for some remarkable scenery in western China.

 

Just south of the Tien Shan mountains, in northwestern Xinjiang province, a remarkable series of ridges dominate the landscape. The highest hills rise up to 1,200 meters (3,900 feet) above the adjacent basins, and they are decorated with distinctive red, green, and cream-colored sedimentary rock layers. The colors reflect rocks that formed at different times and in different environments.  When land masses collide, the pressure can create what geologists call “fold and thrust belts.” Slabs of sedimentary rock that were laid down horizontally can be squeezed into wavy anticlines and synclines. 

The ridge is noticeably offset by a strike-slip or “tear” fault in the image showing the Piqiang Fault, a northwest trending strike-slip fault that runs roughly perpendicular to the thrust faults for more than 70 kilometers (40 miles). The colored sedimentary rock layers are offset by about 3 kilometers (2 miles) in this area.


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Mathijs Booden's comment, February 8, 2014 2:40 PM
Dit hoeft geen strike-slip te zijn. Het zijn hellende lagen, dus de breuk kan ook een op- of afschuiving zijn.
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Kanaal door Nicaragua....doen?

Kanaal door Nicaragua....doen? | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Dwars door Nicaragua....van Atlantische naar de Pacifische Oceaan een kanaal aanleggen. Gekkenwerk? Slecht idee! Hier vind je redenen waarom je dat niet zou moeten doen. 


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 17, 2014 1:42 PM

In my opinion this shouldn’t be done because that lake is the source of the Nicaraguan drinking water. For the economy of the country this canal can be a big help as well as for china but if it mean taking away their water supplies then this is not a good idea. But I guess that the world is changing and china with a better route of shipping will be a good thing for our society.  

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 3, 1:50 PM

Just as I finished scooping the past article dealing with this topic, I scroll down and see this story. I had to read it. I wanted to learn more about such a disastrous plan to build a canal. In return I found out that the plan has yet to be revealed. I most certainly do not change my opinion which I firmly expressed in my last scoop, in regards to this canal being idiotic.

An issue that stood out in this article deals with the Nicaraguan government not holding bids for the job and HKND walking out on top. It seems as if a few backdoor deals concerning a lot of money were made. Bold assumption I know... but so is assuming a canal will be built in Nicaragua! Ba-Zing

I am also interested in learning the credibility of HKND. It seems like an interesting company which is most certainly intertwined somehow with the Chinese Government. How else would an individual, Wang Jing,  come up with the 40 billion dollar purse to pursue this project. 

The potential environmental issues are infinite and effect other environments, both near and far geographically speaking, in a variety of negative ways. Its good to see a team of experts coming together to investigate the canals effects on the area. 

Lastly, the article clearly states how there is no need for the canal due to the Panama Canals newest developments and improvements. The canal can accommodate larger barge's thus increase trade and revenue. 

THe Nicaragua Canal is not a good idea.  

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 6, 3:26 PM

The Chinese want to compete with the US on overseas trading and to do so they want to build their own canal through Nicaragua to rival the Panama Canal to the south.  This will lower the quality of Nicaragua’s drinking water but will greatly bolster the economy. If Nicaragua gets the opportunity to possess a major canal that can fit trader ships previously unable to fit through the Panama Canal this will be great for the people. Nicaragua has a very low country ranking so any economic support that this canal can generate will improve the living conditions of the inhabitants.