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100 Afrikaans steden ooit vernietigd door Europeanen

100 Afrikaans steden ooit vernietigd door Europeanen | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"When tourists visit sub-Saharan Africa, they often wonder 'Why there are no historical buildings or monuments?'  The reason is simple. Europeans destroyed most of them. We only have a few drawings and descriptions by travelers who visited the places before their destruction. In some places, ruins are still visible. Many cities were abandoned when Europeans brought exotic diseases (smallpox and influenza) which started spreading and killing people. Most of those cities lie hidden. In fact the biggest part of Africa history is still under the ground."


Via Seth Dixon
wereldvak's insight:

Wat er nu door IS en andere extremisten (helaas) wordt gedaan is min of meer ook door Europa gedaan ten tijde van het kolonisatieproces. Vernietiging, maar ook uitroeien van de volken door ziekten heeft voor dit verdwijnen gezorgd. Er ligt nog wel heel veel onder de grond, overwoekerd door de natuur.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:27 PM

The issues with poverty and hunger that grip certain parts of Africa- particularly the sub-Sahara- find their roots in the utter subversion and destruction of African societies and states during the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and the subsequent colonization of Africa. European traders placed significant strain of existing African states during the 14th and 15th centuries, as the emergence of "slave states" and the extent of the trade completely changed the demographics of much of Africa. Labor shortages lead to technological shortfalls as well as the dissolution of many African states, as predatory states continued to destroy many civilizations and cultures. By the time that the majority of the West had banned the trade in the 19th century, the damage had already been done; many of the great civilizations of Africa had regressed or been entirely wiped out under the pressure of Europe's demand for slaves. The subsequent colonization of the continent only worsened matters for the Africans, as major hubs of civilization were captured, raided, and destroyed. Traditional societies were subjected to European influences and religion and eventually lost, and yet Europeans looked at the destruction and the lack of economic and political progress their actions had caused and blamed it on the inferiority of the Africans themselves. History has not been kind to Africa, and it is important to remember that that is not her fault. Many civilizations, cities, and states were lost as a direct result of contact with Europeans during the slave trade and the subsequent colonization of the continent. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 6:34 AM

Before European contact, Africa had a number of great urban cities. European arrival foresaw the destruction of those once grand cities. The Europeans brought diseases such as smallpox and influenza to the African continent. Those diseases would hamper the previously unexposed African population. Slavery also drained Africa of millions of people as well. Great African civilizations were brought down by these various calamities. European  arrival was the death knell of the great African civilizations. Africa is still living with this legacy of destruction. Africa is the most rural region in the world, because of this legacy.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:07 PM

Just another way to eliminate any African culture or customs.

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South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.

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Mali in Crisis

Mali in Crisis | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Frankrijk gaat ingrijpen in een (voormalige kolonie) verdeelt land. Fysisch-geografische en cultuurverschillen en tegenstellingen spelen een belangrijke rol in het conflict in de land uit de Sahelzone. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 11, 2013 9:57 AM

In April 2012, Islamist rebels seized power in Northern Mali and have declared independence, proclaiming this region The Islamic State of Azawad.  Recently they have begun to amass armies on the southern limits of their territory and presumably are seeking to topple all of Mali.  The former colonizer, France is being called upon to assist as is the United Nations.  This area is part of a region known as the Sahel, the transition from a dry North Africa to tropical Sub-Saharan Africa, from a Muslim/Arab north to a Christian/Animist/Black region of Africa.  The human and physical geographic divisions in this region plays a major role in this conflict.  


Tags: Mali, Africa, political, conflict, war.

Josephine Castro's curator insight, September 12, 2013 2:35 AM

Islamist militants control Northern Mali

 

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:41 AM

What also was very dangerous about this was that Mali became a safe haven for terrorist groups such as Al-Qaeda,  because of their Islamic ties to the rebels.  If we allow them to control this region, who knows what they could plan.  We spent all this time making them run, giving them a new base would undo a lot of work that has been done in the past 12 years. 

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Dam in de Nijl zorgt voor probleem tussen Egypte en Ethiopië

Dam in de Nijl zorgt voor probleem tussen Egypte en Ethiopië | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

83 miljoen mensen zijn afhankelijk van de Nijl. De grootse Afrikaanse dam wordt in Ethiopië gebouwd in dezelfde Nijl, maar Egypte wil vooral zekerheid hebben over voldoende water. Nu al is dat een probleem (groei van de bevolking is al fors) en de bouw van deze dam maakt het er zeker niet beter op. Ethiopië daarentegen wil energie opwekken voor de economische groei. Dat botst.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 2014 4:16 PM

85% of the Nile's water comes from the Blue Nile that originates in the Ethiopian highlands--it is the Blue Nile that Ethiopia has been working on damming since 2011.  The Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam (GERD) will be located ocated near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps).  As stated in this BBC article (with a nice 1-minute video clip), Egypt and Sudan currently get the majority of the Nile's waters because of outdated colonial-era treaties that ignored upstream riparian states.  This explains why Egypt is adamantly opposed to Ethiopia's plan and is actively lobbying the international community to stop construction on the dam, fearing their water supply with be threatened.  Oil might be the most economically valuable liquid resource in North Africa, but water is the most critical for human habitation.   


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, development. environment, water, energy, borders, political.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:30 AM

This is interesting, and I found it tough to decide what side I want to take.  For Egypt I could see this as being a very real scare.  Ethiopia is building a dam for a resource for power which will cause less water to get to the people of your country.  This is scary considering the Nile is the only source of water.  Ethiopia on the other hand is just pushing through with the project insisting they will work with Egypt on when they fill the reservoir.  They argue that the loss of water to Egypt will not be a huge loss and people will still be able to go about their business as normal.  I think that production of the dam should be paused for the time being and research should be done as to the effects this dam will have on both countries.  With this if the dam is going to cause too many issues, all the time, effort, and money that went into it wouldn't be wasted.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 2:32 PM

In a complicated geographical issue, both Egypt and Ethiopia have ample reason to oppose the plans of the other concerning the damming of the Blue Nile. The damming of the Nile could prove devastating for Egypt, which draws 85% of its water supply from the river. With an increasing population and issues with water scarcity already abundant, it is clear why Egypt is fearful of the proposed plan, as the ecological effects could be devastating. For Ethiopia, the damming of the Nile could prove incredibly fruitful, allowing the nation to more easily engage in trade and could encourage some serious international investment in the region- a move that would not only benefit Ethiopia, but Egypt as well. It is for that reason that Egypt is willing to compromise on the issue, but until its water supply can be protected and secure, tensions over the dam are going to continue to escalate.

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The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013

The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013 | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"The map [above] sorts the countries of the world into three groups based on their relative coup risk for 2013: highest (red), moderate (orange), and lowest (beige)."


Via Seth Dixon
wereldvak's insight:

Factoren die meespelen zijn hieronder genoemd.

 

The algorithm for successful coups uses just four risk factors, one of which is really just an adjustment to the intercept.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Degree of democracy (Polity score, quadratic): higher risk for countries in the mid-range of the 21-point scale.Recent coup activity (yes or no): higher risk if any activity in the past five years.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.

The algorithm for any coup attempts, successful or failed, uses the following ten risk factors, including all four of the ones used to forecast successful coups.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Recent coup activity (count of past five years with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more activity.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.Popular uprisings in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Insurgencies in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Economic growth (year-to-year change in GDP per capita): higher risk with slower growth.Regime durability (time since last abrupt change in Polity score, plus one and logged): lower risk with longer time.Ongoing insurgency (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Ongoing civil resistance campaign (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Signatory to 1st Optional Protocol of the UN’s International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (yes or no): lower risk if yes.

from:http://dartthrowingchimp.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/assessing-coup-risk-in-2012/ ;
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 10:11 AM

While this is not predicting a coup in any of these places, this map is a visualization of data that was used to assess the factors that would make a coup likely (to see an alternate map, here is the Washington Post's review of the same data that mapped the 30 countries most likely to have a coup). 


Questions to Ponder: What factors do you think would be important in compilling data of this nature?  What makes a country susceptible to this type of governmental overthrow?  What creates governmental stability? 


Tags: political, conflict, unit 4 political, governance, Africa.