Wepyirang
Follow
Find tag "visualization"
3.0K views | +0 today
Wepyirang
Web life/Real-time Social Web
Curated by Jimun Gimm
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jimun Gimm from Gobernu Irekia - Gobierno Abierto - Open Government
Scoop.it!

The availability of open data and new trends in data visualisation will transform how we understand our cities.

The availability of open data and new trends in data visualisation will transform how we understand our cities. | Wepyirang | Scoop.it
Due to the increasing availability of large urban datasets, it is now becoming easier to produce online visualisations that capture and help interpret the complex spatial dynamics of cities. Duncan...

Via Iñaki Agirre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jimun Gimm from visualizing social media
Scoop.it!

2013's Complex Social Media Landscape in One Chart

2013's Complex Social Media Landscape in One Chart | Wepyirang | Scoop.it

When Brian Solis introduced the first Conversation Prism in 2008, the world was a seemingly simpler place. There were 22 social media categories, each of which had just a handful of brands.


Flash forward to 2013, and the latest Conversation Prism has four additional categories with at least six brands in each. Like other Conversation Prisms, the data visualization attempts to illustrate the array of social media choices available to marketers.

While the 2008 chart looked like a flower, the latest one resembles a kaleidoscope. Solis, a prominent social media marketing expert, says redoing the chart this time around has been instructive. "Things are changing so fast," he says. "We don't even realize [the landscape] is shifting."

 

The chart also points out that, for many, membership in the social media ecosystem is fleeting. While some brands like Xanga, Kyte and Utterz have disappeared, others that weren't around five years ago — like Path and Banjo — are now among category leaders.


Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Lauren Moss
more...
Denis Lundie's curator insight, July 8, 2013 5:23 AM

Social media, as expected, are proliferating and also being embedded in collaboration applications. They can be public or private. Different social media appeal to different segments of the population for different reasons. Individuals can, and do, join different social networks for different interests or relationships in their lives. Finally, they are quite simply applications, with different functionality, will behave differently.

 

Much has been made in media and education circles of Facebook and Twitter, ranging from the inherent dangers to teaching by means of these, and how to integrate them into education. Policies have been developed around them. This picture should dispel the hype surrounding the most obvious social networks, as unique threats or opportunities, for learning.

 

IT strategies and policies should not developed around individual applications, especially not social networks. e-Safety education especially, should focus on responsible management of privacy, irrespective the medium. Teaching & learning opportunities should be sought in social media that are built for learning, or embedded in rapidly evolving learning applications.

Ryan Burwell's curator insight, July 8, 2013 1:38 PM

We have so many ways of communicating, Brian Solis had to design a novel way of expressing all the ways we can express ourselves!

Lee Tonitto's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:53 AM

If you need the scoial media landscape in 1 chart here it is 

Rescooped by Jimun Gimm from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Why games are good for learning?

Why games are good for learning? | Wepyirang | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Francesco G. Lamacchia's curator insight, November 21, 2013 11:48 AM

Giocando....s'impara! 

Julio Cirnes's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:46 PM

Please teacher, more games!

Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 7, 2014 8:19 AM

Self explanatory visual on the benefits of gaming as a means of learning. Outlined are the rewards, mastery, engagement, intensity, exercise, readiness, and competitiveness. These types of graphics need to be displayed in the classroom. There's always parents who are unsure of how gaming qualifies as teaching. Can't they just sit their kid in front of an iPad all day at home? Well, in the appropriate setting, with the right direction and guidance, games are certainly good for learning. Some people just don't know that from experience yet.