Wellness Wednesdays
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Mobile video pilot aims to reduce ambulance, hospital admission costs - FierceMobileHealthcare (press release)

Mobile video pilot aims to reduce ambulance, hospital admission costs - FierceMobileHealthcare (press release) | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Mobile video pilot aims to reduce ambulance, hospital admission costs FierceMobileHealthcare (press release) The mobile telemedicine approach is focused on improving patient care while avoiding unnecessary hospital emergency trips, Sanford Vieder...
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Telehealth Alliance Formed To Promote Policy Reform

Telehealth Alliance Formed To Promote Policy Reform | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Senators join with connected health cohorts to push for reform in telehealth policies.
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Pressure Sensor on a Contact Lens Could Detect Glaucoma

Pressure Sensor on a Contact Lens Could Detect Glaucoma | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
A high-tech contact lens could be used to diagnose and monitor eye diseases.

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Wearables at CES: The useful, the useless & the downright bizarre

Wearables at CES: The useful, the useless & the downright bizarre | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
While the show has only been going on a day now, we’ve already seen countless new wearables at CES from companies large and small.

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Federal study finds electronic medical records improve health of diabetics - Buffalo News

Federal study finds electronic medical records improve health of diabetics - Buffalo News | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Federal study finds electronic medical records improve health of diabetics Buffalo News Area doctors who participated in a three-year, federally funded study of electronic medical records found an improvement in the health of their diabetic...
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This Pen 3-D Prints Live Cells On A Damaged Bone

This Pen 3-D Prints Live Cells On A Damaged Bone | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Surgeons can precisely position cells on the site of injury and speed up recovery. (This pen #3D prints live cells onto bone & cartilage during surgery. #Amazing #Medical #Technology!
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Videoconferencing Enhances Access to Psychiatric Care for Children and Adults With Mental Illness in Rural Settings | AHRQ Innovations Exchange

Videoconferencing Enhances Access to Psychiatric Care for Children and Adults With Mental Illness in Rural Settings | AHRQ Innovations Exchange | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Telepsychiatry can help rural jails improve connectivity to distant health providers. http://t.co/2x670hKzwQ
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Texts may help people with diabetes manage care - Scope (blog)

Texts may help people with diabetes manage care - Scope (blog) | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Scope (blog) Texts may help people with diabetes manage care Scope (blog) A recent study published in Annals of Emergency Medicine used an automated mobile health (mHealth) program to reach low-income inner-city patients with type 2 diabetes and...
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NIH awards $79M for clinical and translational science - Government Health IT

NIH awards $79M for clinical and translational science - Government Health IT | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
NIH awards $79M for clinical and translational science
Government Health IT
WASHINGTON – The National Institutes of Health on Oct.
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E-Health Tracking Increasingly Common; 21% of people who track their health use some form of technology

E-Health Tracking Increasingly Common;  21% of people who track their health use some form of technology | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it

Whether they have chronic ailments like diabetes or just want to watch their weight, Americans are increasingly tracking their health using smartphone applications and other devices that collect personal data automatically, according to health industry researchers.

“The explosion of mobile devices means that more Americans have an opportunity to start tracking health data in an organized way,” said Susannah Fox, an associate director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project, which was to release the national study on Monday. Many of the people surveyed said the experience had changed their overall approach to health.

More than 500 companies were making or developing self-management tools by last fall, up 35 percent from January 2012, said Matthew Holt, co-chairman of Health 2.0, a market intelligence project that keeps a database of health technology companies. Nearly 13,000 health and fitness apps are now available, he said.

The Pew study said 21 percent of people who track their health use some form of technology.

They are people like Steven Jonas of Portland, Ore., who uses an electronic monitor to check his heart rate when he feels stressed. Then he breathes deeply for a few minutes and watches the monitor on his laptop as his heart slows down.

“It’s incredibly effective in a weird way,” he said.

Mr. Jonas said he also used electronic means to track his mood, weight, mental sharpness, sleep and memory.

Dr. Peter A. Margolis is a principal investigator at the Collaborative Chronic Care Network Project, which tests new ways to diagnose and treat diseases. He has connected 20 young patients who have Crohn’s disease with tracking software developed by a team led by Ian Eslick, a doctoral candidate at the Media Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Data from their phones is reported to a Web site that charts the patients’ behavior patterns, said Dr. Margolis, a professor of pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Some phones have software that automatically reports the data.

Patients and their parents and doctors watch the charts for early warning signs of flare-up symptoms, like abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, before the flare-ups occur. The physicians then adjust the children’s treatment to minimize the symptoms.

“One of the main findings was that many patients were unaware of the amount of variation in their symptoms that they were having every day,” Dr. Margolis said.

The Pew survey found most people with several chronic conditions said that tracking had led them to ask a doctor new questions, led them to seek a second opinion or influenced their treatment decisions.

Mr. Holt said self-tracking products and services companies formed the fastest growing category among the 2,100 health technology companies in his database. He said venture capital financing in the sector rose 20 percent from January through September 2012, with $539 million allotted to new products and services for consumers by Sept. 30.

He attributed the rise to a “perceived increase in consumer interest in wellness and tracking in general, and the expectation that at-home monitoring of all types of patients will be a bigger deal under the new accountable care organizations,” as President Obama’s health care law takes effect.

But even an enthusiast like Mr. Jonas said he saw “a dark side to tracking.”

“People who are feeling down may not want a tracking device to keep reminding them of their mood,” he said.

.

Via Chatu Jayadewa
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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, October 31, 2014 9:24 AM

"The Pew survey found most people with several chronic conditions said that tracking had led them to ask a doctor new questions, led them to seek a second opinion or influenced their treatment decisions."

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Dog's mood offers insight into owner's health

Dog's mood offers insight into owner's health | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Researchers have demonstrated how remote-monitoring of a dog's behavior can be used to alert family and carers that an elderly relative is struggling to cope.
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Health IT Thrives With New StartUp Companies - Forbes

Health IT Thrives With New StartUp Companies - Forbes | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Health IT Thrives With New StartUp Companies Forbes As the health insurance exchanges opened for enrollment yesterday, the federal government, including the President and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), had to acknowledge that it...
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Electronic Health Records Still Causing Security Concerns: Xerox - eWeek

Electronic Health Records Still Causing Security Concerns: Xerox - eWeek | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Electronic Health Records Still Causing Security Concerns: Xerox eWeek Doctors need to educate consumers about digital medical records to comply with upcoming federal mandates, as more health-care providers continue to adopt electronic health...
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Realizing the Promise of Telehealth | The Information Technology ...

Realizing the Promise of Telehealth | The Information Technology ... | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
One important opportunity is to use telehealth technologies to easily connect doctors and patients through online encounters that are often on par with in-person ones, but with lower costs and greater convenience for doctors and patients.
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Veterans Affairs Seeks Info on Unified EHR Viewer - GovCon Wire

Veterans Affairs Seeks Info on Unified EHR Viewer - GovCon Wire | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
healthcare-system The Department of Veterans Affairs is seeking information on an integrated electronic health record system viewer as the agency plans to update EHR technology used by the VA and Defense Department.
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DoD to award electronic health record contract within the year

The Defense Department plans to issue a solicitation for its own version of electronic health records and pick a vendor by the end of the year, according to a DoD official.
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How EHR design can affect patient safety - KevinMD.com

How EHR design can affect patient safety - KevinMD.com | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Right now, most EHR's are like sledgehammers when what we really need are sharp chisels that create works of art.
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Telemedicine behind bars | mHealthNews

Telemedicine behind bars | mHealthNews | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Telehealth is making prision healthcare a lot easier in Louisiana http://t.co/dxYFqR1k6L
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Bill takes aim at lowering healthcare costs with wireless technology - ModernHealthcare.com (blog)

Bill takes aim at lowering healthcare costs with wireless technology - ModernHealthcare.com (blog) | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
mobihealthnews
Bill takes aim at lowering healthcare costs with wireless technology
ModernHealthcare.com (blog)
Rep.
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Telemedicine robots let doctors ‘beam’ into hospitals to evaluate patients, expanding access

Telemedicine robots let doctors ‘beam’ into hospitals to evaluate patients, expanding access | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it

The doctor isn’t in, but he can still see you now.

 

Remote presence robots are allowing physicians to “beam” themselves into hospitals to diagnose patients and offer medical advice during emergencies.

 

A growing number of hospitals in California and other states are using telepresence robots to expand access to medical specialists, especially in rural areas where there’s a shortage of doctors.

 

These mobile video-conferencing machines move on wheels and typically stand about 5 feet, with a large screen that projects a doctor’s face. They feature cameras, microphones and speakers that allow physicians and patients to see and talk to each other.

 

 

“Regardless of where the patient is located, we can be at their bedside in several minutes,” said Dr. Alan Shatzel, medical director of the Mercy Telehealth Network. “Literally, we compress time and space with this technology. No longer does distance affect a person’s ability to access the best care possible.”

 

 original: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/telemedicine-robots-let-doctors-beam-into-hospitals-to-evaluate-patients-expanding-access/2013/11/17/7219dda8-4f96-11e3-9ee6-2580086d8254_story.html#


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Stage 2 patient engagement could come down to marketing | EHRintelligence.com

Stage 2 patient engagement could come down to marketing | EHRintelligence.com | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Providers remain concerned that their incentive payments depend on what patients do. Beating the 5% threshold could come down to how they educate their patients.
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Remote Patient Monitoring Poised for Growth - HealthLeaders Media

New penalties for preventable hospital readmissions are prompting hospitals to adopt technologies that allow patients to measure blood pressure, heart (Remote Patient Monitoring Poised for Growth http://t.co/RrMoIFpqr2...

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Foods To Avoid When The Government Shuts Down

Foods To Avoid When The Government Shuts Down | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
There's no time like a furlough to think about where your food comes from. (Foods to avoid during the government shut downs http://t.co/PRsw14FFQp)
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6 Big Data Analytics Use Cases for Healthcare

6 Big Data Analytics Use Cases for Healthcare | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it

CIO — BOSTON—The increasing digitization of healthcare data means that organizations often add terabytes' worth of patient records to data centers annually.

At the moment, much of that unstructured data sits unused, having been retained largely (if not solely) for regulatory purposes. However, as speakers at the inaugural Medical Informatics World conference suggest, a little bit of data analytics know-how can go a long way.

 

It isn't easy, namely because the demand for healthcare IT skills far outpaces the supply of workers able to fill job openings, but a better grasp of that data means knowing more about individual patients as well as large groups of them and knowing how to use that information to provide better, more efficient and less expensive care.

Feature: 13 Healthcare IT Trends and Predictions for 2013

Here are six real-world examples of how healthcare can use big data analytics.

1. Ditch the Cookbook, Move to Evidence-Based Medicine

Cookbook medicine refers to the practice of applying the same battery of tests to all patients who come into the emergency department with similar symptoms. This is efficient, but it's rarely effective. As Dr. Leana Wan, an ED physician and co-author of When Doctors Don't Listen, puts it, "Having our patient be 'ruled out' for a heart attack while he has gallstone pain doesn't help anyone."

Dr. John Halamka, CIO at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, says access to patient data—even from competing institutions—helps caregivers take an evidence-based approach to medicine. To that end, Beth Israel is rolling out a smartphone app that uses a Web-based- drag-and-drop UI to give caregivers self-service access to 200 million data points about 2 million patients.

Analysis: Is Healthcare IT Interoperability (Almost) Here?

Admittedly, the health information exchange process necessary for getting that patient data isn't easy, Halamka says. Even when data's in hand, analytics can be complicated; what one electronic health record (EHR) system calls "high blood pressure" a second may call "elevated blood pressure" and a third "hypertension." To combat this, Beth Israel is encoding physician notes using the SNOMED CT standard. In addition to the benefit of standardization, using SNOMED CT makes data more searchable, which aids the research query process.

 

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Via Chatu Jayadewa, AnalyticsInnovations
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d-Wise 's curator insight, April 25, 2013 11:36 AM

An interesting explanation as to why clinical data standards and adverse event naming conventions early on in clinical research are sooo important

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Patient Monitoring Systems Market (Equipments & Systems) worth $18.9 Billion ... - PR Web (press release)

Patient Monitoring Systems Market (Equipments & Systems) worth $18.9 Billion ... - PR Web (press release) | Wellness Wednesdays | Scoop.it
Patient Monitoring Systems Market (Equipments & Systems) worth $18.9 Billion ...
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