Innovation in Health
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Innovation in Health
What's new in the world of health and wellness
Curated by Rowan Norrie
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Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier

Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

A lot of the focus in wearable computing has been on delivering products that help everyday users monitor some of the more basic activity traits, such as steps taken and heart rate. While these are certainly useful metrics for health monitoring, they do not paint the full picture.

 

Computational biologists instead study the chemical changes that occur in people’s bodies with the help of optical sensors, non-invasive devices that use the red-to-near-infrared spectral region to assess the chemical changes that occur in the user’s blood vessels, among other places.

 

By leveraging this cutting-edge technology and wearable computing, we are equipped to understand the changes that occur in a person’s body at a whole new level. The implications of this change span from improved training of athletes to better management of chronic diseases and healthcare.

 

 Some interesting recent cases in research that show the potential for disruption include:

 

Researchers at the National Technical University of Athens have helped individuals self-manage diabetes by stimulating the function of an artificial pancreas with fully embedded wearable systems. A paper in the Journal of Biomechanics shows promising results for wearables in athletic training. Scientists mapped out the physiology of athletes’ ski-jumps in order to determine the biological constraints of each individual’s approach. By comparing data across 22 different skiiers, the scientists were able to determine that the wearable system was a very promising tool for training that captured information beyond the capacity of a traditional camera.Researchers at Texas A&M University are investigating the use of optical sensors to interact with dermally-implanted microparticle sensors. This technology could enable cost cutting and continuous blood chemistry monitoring.Optical sensors used to monitor both athletic performance and overall health by researchers at the Dublin Institute of Technology. The sophisticated sensors interpret user’s sweat particles in order to deduce what is going on at a biological level. One of the sensors measured pH levels of sweat particles in order to deduce dehydration while athletes were running. This is a huge stride for activity tracking because it represents real time monitoring of athletic performance and biological signals
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Sue Gould's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:43 AM

Wearable computers are here.  

Dan Baxter's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:20 AM

The next step for quantified and teleheath sensors

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Less privacy but more effective treatment - trade-offs of personalized health movement

Less privacy but more effective treatment - trade-offs of personalized health movement | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Infographic calls attention to growth of personalized health trends to improve outcomes and cut healthcare costs and the patient data security issue posed by them.

 

There’s a huge amount of interest in advancing personalized medicine to offer patients more effective treatment based on their genetic makeups that could also significantly reduce healthcare costs. There is also an increasing prevalence of mobile devices to help people track and report details of their personal health with the goal of supporting remote monitoring. But to what extent will privacy concerns challenge the growth of these areas?

 

People are confiding more personal information than ever through digital health channels. Telemedicine for behavioral health is improving access in areas underserved by psychologists and providing an attractive alternative for some people who might not want to visit an office.

 

Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2013/10/less-privacy-effective-treatment-tradeoffs-personalized-health-movement-infographic/#ixzz2h72XSQe9


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Pere Florensa's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:57 AM

El informe pone en relieve que en función del crecimiento de la e-medicina, crece la posbilidad de tener problemas de seguridad con la privacidad de nuestros datos. Es evidente que uno de los retos a los que habrá que enfrentarse en el futuro, pero la seguridad en la nube cada dia dispone de mas actores en el mercado que posiblemente mejoren esta seguridad.

Pere Florensa's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:59 AM

El informe pone en relieve que en función del crecimiento de la e-medicina, crece la posbilidad de tener problemas de seguridad con la privacidad de nuestros datos. Es evidente que uno de los retos a los que habrá que enfrentarse en el futuro, pero la seguridad en la nube cada dia dispone de mas actores en el mercado que posiblemente mejoren esta seguridad.

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Healthy living could slow down ageing

Healthy living could slow down ageing | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Healthy lifestyle changes such as eating whole foods and practising yoga could reverse the ageing of the body's cells, a study suggests. Patients who adopted healthy diets, exercise regimes and "stress management" techniques for five years developed chromosomes that appeared similar to those of a younger person.

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Health Care | Jim Carroll- Futurist, Trends & Innovation Keynote Speaker

Health Care | Jim Carroll- Futurist, Trends & Innovation Keynote Speaker | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
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"The future belongs to those who are fast" Jim Carroll

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First ever Index to measure the wellbeing of older people | Global Agewatch Index

First ever Index to measure the wellbeing of older people | Global Agewatch Index | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Global AgeWatch provides population ageing data from 195 countries. It has the most up-to-date, internationally comparable statistics on population ageing and life expectancy.
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Personalization — the Holy Grail of Digital Marketing

Personalization — the Holy Grail of Digital Marketing | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
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Digital marketing needs to be targeted if it is to make an impact. This article includes ‘nine-types’ of personas to help personalise approach to help differentiate and target marketing.

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Health data exchange: Paper's not dead yet

Health data exchange: Paper's not dead yet | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Despite increased participation in health information exchanges, U.S. hospitals are struggling to share patient data with each other in "meaningful ways," according to a new report published this week by HIMSS Analytics.
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Healthcare organistions are struggling to share data effectively. This white paper outlines some of the challenges and solutions.

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Google Is Launching A Company That Hopes To Cure Death

Google Is Launching A Company That Hopes To Cure Death | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Google is launching a new company with the...
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10 Ways Doctors Can Make the Most of Social Media

10 Ways Doctors Can Make the Most of Social Media | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
How doctors can benefit from social media like Facebook or LinkedIn to get more patients, build stronger relationships & become more transparent.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor, Chanfimao, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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How data-driven solutions can transform health

How data-driven solutions can transform health | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Over the past few decades, the relationship between health, data and technology has dramatically evolved, and has increased access to information about health issues.

 

As a result, individuals, communities and companies are becoming more knowledgeable and are better equipped to make healthier choices.  At the center of this profound shift is what many have referred to as the Quantified Self movement, which aims to use technology to monitor and collect data about various aspects of daily life including behavior, mood, and health. At the same time, the utilization of “big data” is providing academics, institutions and governments with better tools to inform macro-level decisions regarding health policy and access.


Today, wearable personal tracking devices have taken self-monitoring to the next level, allowing individuals to track fitness, rest and eating habits, which may be used to make lasting behavior changes. Building on the insights of early health monitors for diseases like diabetes and hypertension, today’s devices offer such advantages as speed, accessibility and affordability.


By using these tools to monitor trends and fluctuations, people might choose to ingest fewer calories, take the stairs more often or coordinate their schedules to get more REM sleep.

 

Just as tracking devices and the Quantified Self movement can inspire personal behavior change, parallel collections of large data sets may be effective in solving health crises at a macro level. Academics, for instance, have found that big data has the potential for vastly improving public health. From using air quality data to gain insight into the incidence of respiratory disease, to gathering information on social and sexual networks to predict the spread of infection, there are numerous ways in which big data can be used to create innovative solutions to widespread health problems.

 

This data revolution has already started to take effect with the rise of digitized databases and medical records, which make it easier for health care companies and organizations to analyze information from disparate sources.  A recent McKinsey & Company reportdiscusses the utility of big data for a variety of stakeholders within the health care system, including individuals, providers and payers. Addressing these critical areas becomes easier with smart use of data, ultimately improving health outcomes and the efficiency of health care.


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Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous

Google Glass for medicine: 4 reasons why it could be disastrous | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

The buzz is that Google Glass will transform medicine.  But unless it’s carefully vetted it could be a disaster for patients, clinicians and hospitals.  Until the FDA or research confirms its safety, Google Glass is banned from my clinic as a privacy and medical practice hazard.

 

Here are four reasons why:

 

1.  Privacy violations. Google Glass make it extremely easy to take pictures or video of someone without permission.  Congress has already raised concerns about Google’s unwillingness to ensure privacy protection for non-users in the general public.   The bar should be higher in medicine than the general public.  

 

2.  Hackable. Even if used responsibly by clinicians, that doesn’t mean patients and medical practices aren’t at risk of privacy violations and abuse.  Computers can be hacked; remote access software can allow someone to film/photograph without the users’ knowledge. 

 

3.  Safety concerns with multitasking. Privacy concerns aside, the promise of be able to do more in medicine doesn’t mean we do it better.  There have been recent concerns about “distracted doctors” with too much technology to focus on the task at hand.  To make it worse, doctors may think multitasking improves performance when it actually worsens it.  Some of the decreased performance may lessen with experience, but that means potential distractions like Google Glass may require some formal training before routine use in clinic.

 

4.  Google’s And medicine’s goals aren’t aligned. “Don’t be evil” sounds like it might fit with medicine.  But increasingly Google seems to apply this stated credo to its customers rather than itself.

 


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Heavy kids face health problems, have few options

Heavy kids face health problems, have few options | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Heavy kids face health problems, have few options USA TODAY About 4% to 6% of children and teens in the USA are severely obese, and yet there are very few effective options for helping these kids reach a healthy weight, says a scientific statement...
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Healthy obesity? Study says it is possible to be overweight but not at-risk 

Healthy obesity? Study says it is possible to be overweight but not at-risk  | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Given that the American Medical Association now considers obesity a disease, the phrase "healthy obesity" may seem like an oxymoron.

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Strengthening health care’s supply chain: A five-step plan | McKinsey & Company

Strengthening health care’s supply chain: A five-step plan | McKinsey & Company | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Dramatically changing the sector’s inefficient supply chain may eliminate the dangers posed by counterfeiting and medication errors. A McKinsey & Company article.
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Sickweather: using social media to track illness

Sickweather: using social media to track illness | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Sickweather.com uses social media updates to follow outbreaks of the flu, allergies and other illnesses around the country. Sickweather scans Facebook and Twitter for posts about sickness and gathers the data to form an interactive map showing the areas with the most statuses about infections.


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"The Healthcare revolution will not be televised"

My Presentation from Athens looking at 5 things digital can do to revolutionise pharmaceuticals (with a bit of Gil Scott Heron thrown in for good measure)


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Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, March 15, 2014 5:23 AM

@TedMed par Alex Butler

Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 2014 5:10 AM

Une intéressante présentation (en anglais) qui aborde les principaux concepts qui seront fondateurs de l'e-santé à venir. Une belle inspiration pour le développement des futurs réseaux de santé numériques.

Harry Edwards's comment, June 8, 2015 1:57 AM
Buy medical equipment products online , guaranteed lowest prices at online medical equipment store. We supply medical products in wholesale price across USA
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Marketing Strategy for the Digital Age

Marketing Strategy for the Digital Age | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
While digital gives you the opportunity to reach out to millions with a single click, it also poses a problem: if not monitored properly, it will not be as effective as face-to-face communication.

Via Alex Butler, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Nedko Aldev's curator insight, May 22, 2013 3:08 AM

add your insight...

 
gillkelley's curator insight, May 22, 2013 4:05 AM

6 useful tips for digital marketing - it's always interesting to read different people's views!

Charity WIlls's curator insight, May 25, 2013 3:43 AM

Marketing Strategy for the Digital Age

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Do patients want apps to remind them to stay compliant ?

Do patients want apps to remind them to stay compliant ? | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
There is a misconception within marketing that just because people are using a certain technology or going to a certain website that they want marketers to follow them there.  The rule seems to be ...
Rowan Norrie's insight:

Really interesting article to show how important to carry out research when developing a mobile app to ensure you have the right market segment and the right features and benefits for your product.

 

Also, when looking into reasons why products fail to carry on, you need to consider why they stopped using as well as why some users continue.

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13M wearables to be used in corporate wellness plans by 2018

13M wearables to be used in corporate wellness plans by 2018 | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Over the next five years, 13 million wearable devices embedded with wireless connectivity will be integrated into wellness plans offered by businesses, according to ABI research’s new report.

 

In 2013, principal analyst Jonathan Collins said less than 200,000 wearable devices have been integrated into wellness plans.

 

The report factors in the social and economic drivers supporting the integration of wearable wireless device adoption, such as the point at which people start taking more responsibility in healthcare, Collins told MobiHealthNews.

 

“While some device vendors are hoping that strong consumer awareness will drive corporate wellness adoption for their products, they also need to understand and focus on the most influential parts of the healthcare value chain,” Collins said.

 

More: http://mobihealthnews.com/25852/13m-wearables-to-be-used-in-corporate-wellness-plans-by-2018/

 
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Rowan Norrie's comment, September 28, 2013 5:59 AM
I agree regarding culture, but the main barrier is motivation, and as a recent convert to Fitbit, I think wearables are a big step forward.
Connected Digital Health & Life's curator insight, September 28, 2013 1:56 PM

I am wearing mine, are you?

Mike Rucker's curator insight, September 3, 2014 8:35 PM

Hopefully a good proportion of the 1,300,000 devices will not be simple pedometers and/or accelerometers. Looking forward to see where this might all go.

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8 Elements of Total Patient Engagement

8 Elements of Total Patient Engagement | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
A major trend in healthcare today is the shift to patient engagement. As part of this trend, I did a video interview with Dr. Nick recently where we discussed some of the shifts towards patient eng...

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What Is Creativity? Cultural Icons on What Ideation Is and How It Works

What Is Creativity? Cultural Icons on What Ideation Is and How It Works | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Bradbury, Eames, Angelou, Gladwell, Einstein, Byrne, Duchamp, Close, Sendak, and more.

"Creativity" is one of those grab-bag terms, like

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How Sensors Are Transforming the Life Sciences Industry Landscape

How Sensors Are Transforming the Life Sciences Industry Landscape | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

How sensors are having a major impact on innovation and the competitive landscape for the life sciences industry (medical devices, diagnostics and pharma)..

 

Smartphones, with their portable computing power, built in sensors and always-on internet connectivity are continuing on their path to ubiquity, with over 56% of the US adult population now having smartphones, and over 500,000 new smartphone users being added every month.   Sensor technology has continued to get cheaper, smaller and more sophisticated, with different types of sensors being combined to capture an increasing array of physiological measures.These sensors can be connected to smartphones via miniaturized, low energy via low energy wireless technologies such as low energy Bluetooth and Near Field Communication (NFC).

 

As the world population ages and more

 

Continuous Monitoring


Lightweight, wireless enabled sensor networks connected via smartphones to cloud/server based storage and applications make it feasible to continuously monitor physiological measures.  This is enabling  “aging in place” for the world’s rapidly aging population, allowing more older adults and individuals with chronic conditions to remain in the home environment while they are remotely monitored for safety.

 

Early Detection and Prevention


Data from continuous real time monitoring can be analyzed to provide early detection or in some cases prediction of changes in health status.   This approach is being applied across a wide variety of conditions, including heart disease, epilepsy, parkinsons disease, stroke, dementia, and cancer.  

Extending Therapies from Clinical Settings to the Home


Sensors capturing movement data can be particularly useful for home-based rehabilitation, often leveraging both wearable and ambient sensors to provide augmented feedback. 


Improved Adherence


MedSnap’s Medical App To Improve Medication Safety for Patients

Medication and therapy regimens are only effective if patients adhere to them. Sensors can be applied to monitor adherence and provide inputs to systems designed to improve adherence through alerts, reminders, persuasive design and gamification techniques for patients, caregivers and therapists.


Management of Chronic Conditions


Wearable and ambient sensors can be an important part of an overall system to manage chronic conditions.

The number of wearable physiological sensors connected to smartphones are expected to grow significantly over the next 5 to 10 years.  As the healthcare industry faces increasing pressure to improve outcomes while lowering costs, the ability to combine data from these sensors with data from other systems to measure treatment effectiveness will become more important, not just in clinical trials, but in the context of managing population health.

 

Companies that are proactive in using sensor technology together with other techniques to create and demonstrate superior effectiveness will reap significant rewards in this environment.

 To see examples in each of the categories visit : http://www.hitconsultant.net/2013/09/11/how-sensors-are-transforming-the-life-sciences-industry-landscape/
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Mary Jo Gehrking's curator insight, September 18, 2013 1:27 PM

Lightweight and wireless, wearable and ambient sensors can be an important part of an overall system to remotely manage chronic health conditions via cloud-based storage and applications. While this enables aging and chronically ill adults to to remain in their home environment, there also needs to be ongoing training and tech support for the users, which is often where the funationality of this concept fails.

Richard Platt's curator insight, February 2, 2014 12:14 PM

Sensors - the eyes and ears of the WBAN (Wireless Body Area Network) for healthcare applications, and there are so many others for many other applications

Allen Taylor's curator insight, February 28, 2014 10:40 PM

New sensor technology enables seniors to stay independent longer.

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Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke

Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Nearly 1 in 3 deaths in the US each year is caused by heart disease and stroke.

Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Useful article on background and statistics around how more could be done to prevent deaths from heart disease and stroke

 

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Setting a New Trend in Rare Disease R&D: Turning Small Data into Long Data

Setting a New Trend in Rare Disease R&D: Turning Small Data into Long Data | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

The Vitiligo Research Foundation (VRF) is seeing the massive opportunity in collecting cheap Longitudinal Data as opposed to costly Big Data in order to expedite R&D in rare diseases, using standard healthcare and bioinformatics tools.

Conventional wisdom dictates that data analytics can make typically $1.4 billion drug development faster and cheaper. Big Data deploys sophisticated analytics to parse huge quatities of data from many disparate sources across the healthcare ecosystem to discover patterns that could be useful in problem solving.

The major problem with the current Big Data mega-trend, one that is dominating media casts and conferences nowadays, is that there is not enough data to crunch in a field of more than 7,000 rare diseases. An only slightly lesser problem is that, even if there was enough Big Data on rare diseases, it would be made up of millions of loosely related disease data snapshots, like a movie reel where each frame is technically correct but has no real relation to the surrounding frames.


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