Innovation in Health
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Innovation in Health
What's new in the world of health and wellness
Curated by Rowan Norrie
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5 Futuristic Military Medical Technologies | Qmed

5 Futuristic Military Medical Technologies | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Richard Satava calls himself a “technology harvester” when it comes to his work as a senior science advisor at the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command. It helps when you’re representing an outfit that knows how to keep secrets. “People will trust us with their information,” Satava, an emeritus professor of surgery at the University of Washington, told a gathering at the 10X Medical Device Conference, which LinkedIn’s Medical Device Group help just outside Minneapolis last week.

And while specific uses for technologies are secrets, Satava was happy to discuss the general technologies he’s investigated over the years, technologies that could prove to be real game changers.

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My 'Treadmill Desk' Makes Me Work (And Feel) Better

My 'Treadmill Desk' Makes Me Work (And Feel) Better | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Tools that keep us active while we work could give companies much needed productivity gains and reduce the costs of keeping employees healthy. By Pierre Chandon, L’Oréal Chaired Professor of Marketing, Innovation and Creativity at INSEAD Take a walk with me. We don’t need to go outside. I’m writing this on a treadmill [...]
Rowan Norrie's insight:

What other ideas are out there that keep you moving when you woudl otherwise be sitting still?

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Role of Entrepreneurs in Informal Care market: New report from Nesta

Role of Entrepreneurs in Informal Care market: New report from Nesta | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The role that entrepreneurs and technology can play in improving informal care in the UK
Rowan Norrie's insight:

Increasing demand for products to assist informal carers as the number requiring care is expected to increase from 6.1 million today to around 9 million in 10 years time.

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Health Care Apps Offer Patients an Active Role

Health Care Apps Offer Patients an Active Role | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Mobile applications and devices let people take pictures of moles or record a heartbeat and then communicate accordingly with their doctor.


Via Olivier Gryson
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Digital Prevention - Tech solutions stop consumers from having to suffer through minor health issues

Digital Prevention - Tech solutions stop consumers from having to suffer through minor health issues | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Digital solutions are going to aid the modern consumer in the future for an experience that's more in-line with their digital lifestyle, convenient and offers a surplus of information on an individuals health. Individuals will soon be able to lean on digitally connected solutions to not only diagnose, but prevent health problems.

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What are the three main gaps in digital health?

What are the three main gaps in digital health? | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Arlen Meyers (@ArlenMD) presents a short video offering his view as to what the three main gaps are in digital health.


Via Andrew Spong
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Andrew Spong's curator insight, April 22, 2014 9:20 AM

I agree with #1.

 

From my POV, #2 is a red herring (few are more than one degree away from HIT; we're in a transitional era; use savings from effectively deployed HIT to target hard-to-reach groups by other means)

 

#3 is only a 'digital health gap' insofar as it is an internal, structural issue exacerbated by legacy organisations' inability to reform, adapt, and redeploy resources. If they can't manage this, they'll perish anyway.

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Six futures for health data | Nesta

Six futures for health data | Nesta | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Rowan Norrie's insight:

Future scenarios of how personal data from wearables might be utilised. Interesting that some groups imagined a cash value.

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9 Ways Medical Devices Fail | Qmed

9 Ways Medical Devices Fail | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Qmed (formerly Medical Device Link) is the world's first completely prequalified supplier directory and news source for medical device OEMs. Find medical device suppliers and IVD suppliers who are FDA-registered, ISO 13485- and ISO 9001-certified. Qmed is also the home of Medical Product Manufacturing News and the most relevant breaking news for the medical device industry.
Rowan Norrie's insight:

This is a a great article, which highlights that medical devices often fail because the companies have not taken account of basic requirements right at the start of the innovation process. One key one is gathering input from all the stakeholders, not just your immediate customer. This means speaking to clinicians, patients, family and carers:

*  How are they using or misusing the current alternative?

*  Where do they store it? How do they dispose of it? Think about the whole life cycle of the product in use.

*  What are the unmet needs? Issues? Niggles? Pain points?

 

Dive deep to really understand. And then focus on delivering value.

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Top 5 emerging medical technologies to watch in 2014 | Impact Lab

Top 5 emerging medical technologies to watch in 2014 | Impact Lab | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Robotic check-ups Medical technology companies are focusing more than ever on products that deliver cheaper, faster, more efficient patient care. They are
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EmmanuelGrunenberger's curator insight, March 13, 2015 5:10 AM

#NeedleFree #diabetes care, electronic #migraine relieve, #robotic #check-ups are among #healhcare #innovation to come soon ;)

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Self-Assembling DNA Cages Could Transport Medicine Inside Your Body

Self-Assembling DNA Cages Could Transport Medicine Inside Your Body | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Straight out of a science fiction novel, comes a new scientific breakthrough from Harvard’s Wyss Institute. Small, just got smaller but with a bigger potential to deliver life-saving medicine from inside your body. The cages, or DNA structures, are considered the most complex structures constructed entirely from DNA. And, in a complete [...]
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3-D printer creates transformative device for heart treatment

3-D printer creates transformative device for heart treatment | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Igor Efimov, PhD, at the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis and an international team of biomedical engineers and materials scientists have created a 3-D elastic membrane made of a soft, flexible, silicon material that is precisely shaped to match the heart's epicardium, or the outer layer of the wall of the heart.

 

Current technology is two-dimensional and cannot cover the full surface of the epicardium or maintain reliable contact for continual use without sutures or adhesives.


Via Andrew Spong
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MedTech Breakthroughs: February 2014 Edition | Qmed

MedTech Breakthroughs: February 2014 Edition | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

When it comes to medical device innovation, 2014 started out with a bang—or more precisely with the thump of a beating heart.

University of Illinois-Champaign researchers announced they have created a super-thin silicone-encased, bendable energy harvester that can be affixed to a beating heart. Meanwhile, Google said that it is engaged in medtech innovation as it develops a glucose-reading contact lens.

If the rest of the year is like January and February, 2014 could be a memorable year indeed for medical device innovation. Read on to find out about five medtech breakthroughs that have already made news this year.

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In-Depth: A brief history of digital patient engagement tools

In-Depth: A brief history of digital patient engagement tools | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Without a doubt patient engagement is one of the more important trends in healthcare and health IT right now. Over the past few years the tools that look to enable patient engagement between providers and patients have changed markedly. It is important to note, however, that the tools themselves are just a small part of the story — they can go a long way toward improving patient engagement, though. The drivers of the patient engagement buzz are varied, but one big one is the federal government’s Office of the National Coordinator’s (ONC) Meaningful Use (MU) program, which is beginning to include requirements for very basic patient engagement services. 


ONC’s MU Stage II requirements include at least three patient engagement related deliverables of providers. To meet Stage II, providers must give patients clinical summaries after each visit. They must use electronic secure messaging to communicate with patients on relevant health information with a minimum of 5 percent of their patients during the review period. They must also provide patients with the ability to view online, download and transmit information about a hospital admission and give them access to any health information about that patient the providers receives — within four days of receiving it.


Read more: http://mobihealthnews.com/29985/in-depth-a-brief-history-of-digital-patient-engagement-tools/


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Successful mobile health apps: four determining factors

Successful mobile health apps: four determining factors | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Mobile research firm research2guidance surveyed more than 2,000 developers and found some common traits among the successful mobile health apps:

 

Their revenue model is service-based, rather than based on paid downloads. More than a third of so-called successful apps, ranging from image sharing to sophisticated remote monitoring, get their revenue primarily from service sales, research2guidance said.

They integrate with other databases or health tracking devices. Open APIs allow apps to access more data that can enrich their value.

They have a large portfolio. More than one-third of the “successful” developers had published more than 20 mobile health apps, the firm said.

IOS is their No. 1 platform. A whopping three-fourths of successful developers had a preference for iOS over Android.


Via Andrew Spong
Rowan Norrie's insight:

Excellent article highlighting key facts about the mobile health sector, with link to free report.

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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, May 20, 2014 5:34 AM

Añadiría otros factores que salieron en #eSaludCyL como la facilidad de uso y la motivación para su utilización a largo plazo

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Intel's CEO looks to hobbyists for wearable innovations

Intel's CEO looks to hobbyists for wearable innovations | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
SAN MATEO, California (Reuters) - Intel Corp's Chief Executive Officer Brian Krzanich mingled with electronics buffs at Silicon Valley's annual maker mecca on Saturday as the chipmaker looks to amateur

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, May 18, 2014 5:07 PM

Intel is not the only technology company to look to the growing maker movement for inspiration but it has been among the most aggressive. ARM Holdings, Atmel and other chipmakers all have exhibitions at the weekend event to make sure that hobbyists are up to speed on their latest components.  - "These are the future engineers, the future scientists, the guys who will be inventing the next companies that create great products, whether it's the next Google or Apple. We want them to be aware of Intel technology," Krzanich said.

Ivan Frain's curator insight, May 19, 2014 3:19 AM

Hobbyists the new strategic target of Intel to push Edison, the Intel's iot processor. 

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Serious worldwide threat to public health noted in WHO’s first global report on antibiotic resistance | KurzweilAI

Serious worldwide threat to public health noted in WHO’s first global report on antibiotic resistance | KurzweilAI | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The MRSA superbug (in yellow), often found in hospitals, is resistant to antibiotics and can lead to death, but a new polymer-antibiotic combo to deal with

Via Paul Epping
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How Google Glass will Disrupt the Hearing Aid Industry?

How Google Glass will Disrupt the Hearing Aid Industry? | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Rowan Norrie's insight:

How taking a problem away from the usual solution finders and opening up the scope for new innovation can result in breakthrough solutions.

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Could wearables become bigger than tablets? - Fortune Tech

Could wearables become bigger than tablets? - Fortune Tech | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The market forecast for mobile gadgets worn on your wrist, hip, or head is stellar, and tech's biggest players are preparing for the rush.
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EUROPA - Press release - Healthcare in your pocket: unlocking the potential of mHealth

EUROPA - Press release - Healthcare in your pocket: unlocking the potential of mHealth | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Via Sven Awege
Rowan Norrie's insight:

Links to useful European strategy and green papers on eHealth

 

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Sven Awege's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:48 AM

he European Commission is today launching a consultation on #mHealth or mobile health, asking for help in finding ways to enhance the health and wellbeing of Europeans with the use of mobile devices, such as mobile phones, tablets, patient monitoring devices and other wireless devices.

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Big Pharma Opens New Chapter On Big Data Collaboration

Big Pharma Opens New Chapter On Big Data Collaboration | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
In the course of one short week, no less than 3 different models have emerged for sharing big data in the pharmaceutical industry. The highest profile of these ‒ called Project Data Sphere (PDS here) ‒ was announced earlier today with the official opening of an online resource to share clinical trial data [...]
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Anatomy of a Patient Awareness Campaign That Drives Demand

Anatomy of a Patient Awareness Campaign That Drives Demand | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
An integrated patient awareness campaign for the ON-Q* medical device increases awareness and adoption for post-op pain relief with less narcotics.

Via Anneliz Hannan
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Anneliz Hannan's curator insight, March 17, 2014 10:19 AM

Reaching out to the touch points for patient engagement

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Digital Health: Germany launches 1st prescribed app – Caterna Vision Therapy reimbursed by statutory health insurer

Digital Health: Germany launches 1st prescribed app – Caterna Vision Therapy reimbursed by statutory health insurer | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Via Philippe Loizon
Rowan Norrie's insight:

Is this the start of the flood of prescribed apps? Caterna demonstrates how to identify a need that wasn't being well met and builds a compelling solution aimed at engaging young children.

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Bettina Gifford's curator insight, March 25, 2014 2:18 PM

An amazing App to facilitate and track eye exercises ..

Hélène Introvigne's curator insight, April 5, 2014 7:24 AM

le début des prescriptions & remboursements des apps Santé

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Health apps: where do they make sense? A patient opinion-informed white paper

Health apps: where do they make sense? A patient opinion-informed white paper | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Conclusions of the first ever cross-stakeholder, pan-european seminar on health apps, held at the King's Fund on 28 October 2013.

 

Direct download from Alex Wyke's blog: https://www.dropbox.com/s/xt6oh78wpn4b1ef/MASTER%20A4%20WHITE%20PAPER%20PDF.pdf

 

The five key messages:

 

1. Overhauling healthcare systems–making them patient-centric

2. Engaging doctors in the prescribing of health apps
3. Overseeing quality standards for health apps
4. Ensuring that health apps remain of a high standard throughout their lifetime
5. Considerations for policymakers wishing to oversee health apps


Via Andrew Spong
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Andrew Spong's curator insight, March 18, 2014 5:17 AM

My POV:

 

1. Lip-service has been given to this idea since time immemorial, but there are few examples of such change having not only been instantiated, but maintained, and used to drive strategic direction. This is a systemic problem which I don't think will be resolved until we accept that 'reskinning' existing structures is inadequate to the needs of truly patient-centred healthcare design.

 

2. Unenforceable, but necessary. A paradox that may only be resolved through cross-constituency digital peer-review (imagine the degree of insight and involvement if there were a '#FOAMed meets #bcsm' for every disease area)

 

3. See above. 'Regulation' as we understand it will neither be viable, nor enforceable. Whether we want a 'top layer' of heavy-hitting health faculty acting as a secondary filter before content enters the App Store (Apple) and Play (Google) is another question. I'm not sure if it's even a good idea (re-replacing 'evidence with eminence' again) unless it's largely automated using a Watson-like AI with a complete picture of the existing gold standard in all evidence.

 

4. Predicated upon the expectation that they're of a high standard at launch, which simply isn't the case.. The majority of health-related content available as apps is of low quality and relevance.

 

5. Re. the first paragraph of the synopsis of this section: 'The consensus at the seminar was that the adoption of smartphone technology will not create health inequalities, but rather can increase healthcare sustainability'. I strongly agree with this line of reasoning, and feel that the 'digital divide' debate needs to be answered once and for all.

 

My answer to this last point: principally, this is a period of transition, and no plans should be made to accommodate perceived (and usually unsubstantiated) inequalities in terms of access to health information which will diminish over time -- although NB levels of health literacy are another matter. Where digital exclusion exists (and such conclusions often overlook the 'one step removed' access to digital health via family members, friends, and carers) the savings made from the efficient implementation of lower-cost digital health initiatives (and there really should be some; if there aren't, questions need to be asked about the organisation under review) should be reinvested in targeting hard-to-reach communities in an offline setting.

rob halkes's curator insight, March 18, 2014 6:25 AM

Great Read!

Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, March 21, 2014 2:55 PM

Aportes y conclusiones del primer seminario pan-europeo sobre apps de salud. Muy interesante.

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Surviving and Thriving With Cancer Using a Web-Based Health Behavior Change Intervention: Randomized Controlled Trial

Surviving and Thriving With Cancer Using a Web-Based Health Behavior Change Intervention: Randomized Controlled Trial | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a six-week Web-based multiple health behavior change program for adult survivors.


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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Deborah Fenlon's curator insight, February 26, 2014 7:45 PM

We based intervention can improve sleep and exercise in cancer survivors, but may not affect dietary behaviour.

 

Teresa Levitch's curator insight, February 27, 2014 6:17 PM

Results: In total, 303 survivors completed the follow-up survey (six months after completion of the baseline survey) and participants in the Web-based intervention condition had significantly greater reductions in insomnia and greater increases in minutes per week of vigorous exercise and stretching compared to controls. There were no significant changes in fruit and vegetable consumption or other outcomes.

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Including patients in digital health design: Two startups share how they've done it

Including patients in digital health design: Two startups share how they've done it | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

During a Stanford MedX Live panel on healthcare entrepreneurship Tuesday night, someone on Twitter posed an important question: How can we better incorporate the patient’s voice into the development of healthcare IT?


Adrian James is co-founder of Omada Health, a venture-backed digital health company that designed a 16-week diabetes prevention program to help at-risk people develop healthier habits through social support, data tracking, personalized coaching and structured learning. It’s based on the Diabetes Prevention Program, which was tested in a 3,200-subject study and demonstrated that people with pre-diabetes could cut their risk of disease progression by losing weight through exercise and diet changes.


The former designer at IDEO explained that one of the first steps in creating Omada Health was getting user feedback, even before there was a product.


“We literally went out with a single printed piece of paper – it was this concept that we might be able to match people with pre-diabetes into small groups and usher them, in a virtual setting, through this clinical trial,” he said.


Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2014/02/bringing-patients-design-process-heres-two-digital-health-startups/


Via Parag Vora
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PatientView's curator insight, February 26, 2014 12:11 PM

Not only there should be patients supplying user feedback but they should also be incorporated in helping in design and decision making itself - patient co-creation is the wave of the future in healthcare