Innovation in Health
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Innovation in Health
What's new in the world of health and wellness
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5 Ways Wearable Technology Will Impact Healthcare

5 Ways Wearable Technology Will Impact Healthcare | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Wearable technology is an industry that continues to grow and adapt to meet the ever-changing needs of our world.

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Marco Antonio Gonzalez's curator insight, January 9, 3:01 AM

About the eHeatlh from new visions in the nerwork 

Richard Platt's curator insight, January 13, 2:49 PM

5 Ways Wearable Technology Will Impact Healthcare 

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5 Trends For Health CIOs In 2014

5 Trends For Health CIOs In 2014 | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Here are five significant trends healthcare CIOs should pay attention to in 2014, partly because of their bearing on the main events. 


Patient portals, Direct messaging, medical identity theft, cloud storage, and mobile devices will keep healthcare execs busy.


1. Patient portals
Because of rising consumer interest in health IT, the industry transition to accountable care, and most of all, Meaningful Use Stage 2, patient portals are hot. Nearly 50% of hospitals and 40% of ambulatory practices already provide patient portals, according to a Frost & Sullivan report. The firm predicted that the value of the portal business would soar to nearly $900 million in 2017, up 221% from its worth in 2012.


2. Direct messaging
In the past few years, the Direct Project protocol for secure clinical messaging has steadily gained momentum. EHRs must include Direct capability to receive 2014 certification, and Direct messaging is also one way to satisfy the Meaningful Use Stage 2 requirement that providers exchange care summaries electronically at transitions of care. Some health information exchanges are using Direct to communicate with physicians who don't have EHRs. Eventually, Direct messages could replace faxes.


3. Cyberattacks and medical identity theft
Over the past few years, there has been a quantum leap in the number of cyberattacks on healthcare organizations. The Ponemon Institute, which tracks computer security in a number of industries, says healthcare is increasingly attractive to cyber-criminals because the information required to steal a medical identity is worth far more on the street than Social Security numbers or credit card numbers alone. As a result, Ponemon reported, the number of medical identity theft victims in the US soared from 1.42 million in 2010 to 1.85 million in 2012.


4. Cloud storage and cloud-based EHRs
Security concerns were the biggest reason CIOs and other healthcare leaders said they were reluctant to use cloud storage in an HIMSS Analytics focus group. Some participants said they'd be comfortable using a private cloud hosted by their software vendor. Others said the cloud was fine for business-related information, but that they wouldn't trust it for storing personal health information.


5. Mobile devices
BYOD is a major concern for CIOs, as is insecure texting between clinicians, and those issues will continue. But 2014 could be the year when physicians start prescribing mobile health apps to patients. If there's a major increase in the use of these apps by patients with chronic diseases, monitoring data from patients' mobile devices might also start flowing into hospitals and practices.


more at http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/mobile-and-wireless/5-trends-for-health-cios-in-2014/d/d-id/1113133


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3 Unintended Consequences of Digital Health`

3 Unintended Consequences of Digital Health` | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

#1. Isolation & Loss of Human Touch

Yes, patients need technology and progressive medical devices to manage their health. But they also need to be seen, listened to, and cared for (physically) by other people, including doctors, nurses and caregivers. Empathy and compassion – a warm smile, a kind word, or a re-assuring tone are equally important in bringing about health and wellness.

 

I worry that too much focus on digital healthcare, (and conversely too few in-person experiences between doctors and patients) might lead to feelings of isolation, remoteness and even doubt.

 

Patients who are more passive in nature may even resist the shift to greater personal responsibility and technology-based guidance. The result: They end up feeling like they don’t really have any support to manage their health.

 

#2. Marginalization of the Poor

While we can all agree that significant advantages are being realized through ehealth products and services, we also have to admit that these technologies mostly benefit those who have access to greater resources.


In fact a 2007 study published in the U.S. National Library of Medicine warned that significant challenges must be addressed by the research community to assure that advances in e-health will help eliminate, not intensify health disparities.

 

I know it’s hard to believe, but there are many people in this country who don’t have access to the Internet, or even a home computer. How will e-health reach these people? The fact is, people or communities with limited access to digital technology are largely the same as those suffering the greatest health disparities and traditionally underserved by the healthcare system.

 

#3. Information overload

Today, patients are more empowered. They have access to information that can help them make better decisions about their health – in an ideal world.


But as the volume of personal health and wellness data from medical devices, smartphone apps, and even EMR’s increases, patients will be faced with information overload and some may find it hard to act upon.

 

For passive patients in particular, having too much information at their disposal might actually lead to inaction rather than action, because they’re used to simply following doctor’s orders. In addition to being sick they now have the added burden of figuring out what their health data means and what to do about it.

 

What do you think?

 

Read more: http://wordviewediting.com/3-unintended-consequences-of-digital-health/


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Damien Catani's curator insight, December 30, 2013 2:01 AM

We hear so many positive things about digital health revolution that it's good to look at its dark side and stay critical

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The Top Medtech Trends of 2013 | Qmed

The Top Medtech Trends of 2013 | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Qmed (formerly Medical Device Link) is the world's first completely prequalified supplier directory and news source for medical device OEMs. Find medical device suppliers and IVD suppliers who are FDA-registered, ISO 13485- and ISO 9001-certified.
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The rise and fall of telehealth in 2013

The rise and fall of telehealth in 2013 | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Dick Vinegar, the Patient from Hell, tracks telehealth's rollercoaster ride over the last twelve months

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How an Engineer Made a Life-Saving Cardiovascular Device for Himself | Qmed

How an Engineer Made a Life-Saving Cardiovascular Device for Himself | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Qmed (formerly Medical Device Link) is the world's first completely prequalified supplier directory and news source for medical device OEMs. Find medical device suppliers and IVD suppliers who are FDA-registered, ISO 13485- and ISO 9001-certified.
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The ultimate example of how innovation is inspired by necessity.

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Infographic: PEW Report - The Diagnosis Difference

Infographic: PEW Report - The Diagnosis Difference | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

45% of U.S. adults live with chronic disease 


Living with a chronic disease has an independent effect on people’s technology adoption and health behavior 

 

72% of U.S. adults living with chronic conditions use the internet 

 

7 in 10 track weight, diet, exercise routine, or symptoms 

 

 

67% of U.S. adults living with high blood pressure are internet users


69% of U.S. adults living with asthma or other lung conditions are internet users


56% of U.S. adults living with diabetes are internet users


59% of U.S. adults living with heart conditions are internet users


70% of U.S. adults living with a chronic condition other than those specified in the report are internet users.

 

Surprisingly, only 11% of U.S. adults living with one or more chronic conditions have consulted online rankings or reviews of hospitals or other medical facilities.


People living with chronic conditions are more likely than others to fact check with a medical professional what they find online

 

The findings of this report presents a great opportunity of engaging patients with chronic conditions using internet and social media


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eMedToday's curator insight, November 26, 2013 7:23 PM

WOW

Social Shweta's curator insight, December 3, 2013 1:37 PM

It's time for #HCPs to explore the huge potential Engaging with patients especially the ones with chronic diseases online. #PatientEngage | The awaited PEW Report is here..

Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, December 7, 2013 11:05 AM

Si bien las estadísticas pertenecen a los Estados Unidos, marcan una tendencia, que ya fue advertida por otros estudios (You share, We care). En América Latina tenemos que avanzar en e-Health porque los pacientes están ya en esa conversación!

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What a hospital room looks like when it's designed around the patient

What a hospital room looks like when it's designed around the patient | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

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Patients Speak Out on Diabetes Technology (Original Infographic!)

Patients Speak Out on Diabetes Technology (Original Infographic!) | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
      Late last week we published the detailed results of our big Patient Voices survey, conducted online in September 2013.  Today, we get to unveil our first-ever original DiabetesMine infographic (!

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Fitbit study: UK adults find mobile health tracking, not public messaging, effective | mobihealthnews

Fitbit study: UK adults find mobile health tracking, not public messaging, effective | mobihealthnews | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

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Olivier Janin's curator insight, November 21, 2013 6:11 AM

 31%  self-tracked their health and fitness via computer program, website, or mobile device, 

23 % use paper.

 

Motivations for tracking their health,

46%  to feel good,

23% to look good,

19% to perform well.

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Medication adherence: whose problem is it?

Medication adherence: whose problem is it? | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

The market for digital tools that improve medication adherence is heating up. Over the last year Mango Health launched, AdhereTech announced a new clinical trial, Janssen Healthcare Innovationscompletely revamped its Care4Today app, and Proteus demonstrated its tracking accuracy. And we’re constantly learning about new devices and apps like those from CyberDoctor, Ai Cure, and Nightingale, among many others.


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Michael Bellissimo's curator insight, August 28, 8:06 AM

I am using MangoHealth just to try it out. What innovations are you trying out?

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The future of medicine: 3D printing medical devices at home is just the beginning

The future of medicine: 3D printing medical devices at home is just the beginning | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
3D printing is already being used to produce medical devices. In the not-too-distant future, the technology may be used to manufacture and package...
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Google Wants You to Live 170 Years

Google Wants You to Live 170 Years | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
In September, Google announced it would fund a new venture, Calico. Its goal is to extend human life by 20 to 100 years. But there are implications...
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Using Social Media in Oncology for Education and Patient Engagement

Using Social Media in Oncology for Education and Patient Engagement | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
We presented an interactive session entitled “Using Social Media in Oncology for Education and Patient Engagement” at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2012 Annual Meeting.

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rob halkes's curator insight, January 17, 5:30 AM

Straight forward support, a well phrased guidance. ,

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Top 10 Medical Breakthroughs for 2014

Top 10 Medical Breakthroughs for 2014 | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

#1 Retinal Prosthesis:

In a healthy eye, the rods and cones of the retina are specialized cells that convert light into tiny electrochemical impulses that are sent via the optic nerve into the brain, where they are decoded into images. However, if these delicate photoreceptors are ever damaged, the initial step in the process is disrupted and the visual system cannot transform light into images, leading to blindness...


#2 Genome-Guided Solid Tumor Diagnostics:

Too often, men and women hear the words "prostate cancer," "breast cancer," and "colorectal cancer" from their doctors and they immediately think the worst. Many times the aggressive therapies are unnecessary that are offered or demanded. However, there are now genomic-based tests that can make these treatment decisions much easier and more reliable.


#3 Responsive Neurostimulator for Intractable Epilepsy:

Epilepsy is a neurological condition that produces seizures—brief disturbances in the normal electrical activity of the brain—that affect various mental and physical functions. Seizures happen when clusters of nerve cells in the brain signal abnormally, which may briefly alter a person’s consciousness or movements. When a person has two or more unprovoked seizures, he or she is considered to have epilepsy.


#4 New Era in Hepatitis C Treatment:

Hepatitis C infection, a common liver disease that affects an estimated four million people in the United States, is transmitted through exposure to infected blood (blood was not screened effectively for hepatitis C until 1992) or sexual contact with an infected person. The majority of people with the ailment don’t realize that they have the disease because of a lack of symptoms.


#5 Perioperative Decision Support System:

Anesthesia is given to patients to inhibit pain, sedate the body, and also regulate various bodily functions in surgery. Today, there are 51 million hospital surgical procedures performed annually in the United States, most which are not possible without anesthesia. Before the discovery of anesthesia and the first painless surgery in 1842, surgical patients had their pain dulled with opium or copious amounts of alcohol. With the advent of many new medications and surgical monitoring equipment, we are now in the modern era of anesthesia and optimal surgical care.


#6 Fecal Microbiota Transplantation:

Many hospitalized patients develop hospital-acquired infections, oftentimes due, paradoxically, to broad-spectrum and fluoroquinolone antibiotic therapy used for medical treatment. Antibiotics, which are supposed to kill bacteria, can also increase the odds of some people developing a dangerous and potentially lethal infection from rod-shaped bacteria called Clostridium difficile, or C. diff.


#7 Relaxin for Acute Heart Failure:

Heart failure is a debilitating and potentially life-threatening condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to supply the body. Symptoms of fatigue, shortness of breath, and fluid retention are caused by a weakened or stiffened heart, significantly diminishing its ability to fill normally or effectively distribute blood. According to the American Heart Association, approximately five million people experience heart failure in the United States and more than half a million new cases are diagnosed annually in this country.


#8 Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation Station:

A colonoscopy is an exam that lets a gastroenterologist look closely at the inside of the entire colon and rectum for polyps, the small growths that over time can become cancerous. Using a colonoscope, a thin, flexible, hollow, lighted tube that has a tiny video camera on the end, the doctor sends pictures to a TV screen. The exam itself takes about 30 minutes. Patients are usually given light sedation to help them relax and sleep while the procedure is performed.


#9 TMAO ASSAY: Novel Biomaker for the Microbiome:

There is a global hunt in progress using a variety of cardiovascular fingerprints—scientists call them biomarkers—that have been discovered or created to help identify the initiation, development, and ongoing cascade of damage caused by heart disease.


#10 B-Cell Receptor Pathway Inhibitors:

Chemotherapy is a blunt instrument designed to indiscriminately kill rapidly dividing cells in the hope that the cancer cells die more and grow back less than healthy cells. That normal cells are routinely damaged in this destructive procedure accounts for the side effects and toxicity of traditional chemotherapy.

 

Read more: http://www.clevelandclinic.org/innovations/summit/topten/2014.html#.Ur7HSPQW0kQ


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Pharma gets social: Top-10 pharma social media firsts in 2013

Pharma gets social: Top-10 pharma social media firsts in 2013 | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

As 2013 draws to a close, Daniel Ghinn has put together a list of his top-ten favourite pharma social media 'firsts' of the year - new things that pharmaceutical companies have been doing in social media.

It's been a year packed with new ideas, channels, and lessons learned. 

 

In pharma social media, this list is where the new ground is being taken in what is still a challenging environment for regulated pharmaceutical industry.

Here's what pharma did for the first time in 2013:


10. Cleaned up its Twitter name


9. Implemented Tumblr to support patients


8. Exceeded 7 million views on YouTube


7. Reached 90,000 likes on Facebook


6. Integrated social media with a prescription product website


5. Lost $160m in a social media crisis


4. Maximised congress activity with social media


3. Hosted disease-focused chats on Twitter


2. Trained doctors in social media


1. Activated Digital Opinion Leaders


To read in detail about each of the above, check out the original post at http://www.pharmaphorum.com/articles/pharma-gets-social-top-10-pharma-social-media-firsts-in-2013


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Leo J. Bogee III's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:52 PM

$160 million gone over a doctor shared misinformation via a 140-character post on Chinese social media site Sina Weibo.  The Power of Social Media.

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5 Health Tech Trends to Watch in 2014

5 Health Tech Trends to Watch in 2014 | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

If 2013 was the year of wearables and health apps, what’s on tap for 2014?

 

Here are five exciting health tech trends to keep an eye on for the new year.

 

1. Data in the Doctor’s OfficeAccording to Pew Research, 21% of Americans already use some form of technology to track their health data, and as the market for wearable devices and health apps grows, so too will the mountain of data about our behaviors and vitals. Next year, we may see more of this data incorporated into our day-to-day medical care.

2. Smart Clothes

If a wristband or clip-on tracker isn’t part of your look, there’s hope for you in 2014, because a new wave of wearable smart garments will be hitting the stores next year. In fact, market research company Markets and Markets expects sales of smart clothes and fabrics to reach $2.03 billion by 2018.

 

3. Augmented NutritionOf course, if you want to fit into the latest smart fashion, you might need to keep better tabs on what you’re eating. We’ve already seen popular apps such as Fooducate make things easy by letting you scan the barcodes on packaged foods to gather nutrition data. In 2014, we’ll see new technologies that take even more of the guesswork out of counting calories. 4. Virtual House Calls

Virtual house calls also just got a big boost with the recent launch of Google Helpouts, a new marketplace for getting personalized help over live video chat. Although it’s still early days for the new service, you can already browse the Google Helpouts Health marketplace for medical advice, mental health issues, nutrition counseling, weight loss and more. You can even get wellness advice for your pets.

 

5. Health Rewards

If looking and feeling good isn’t enough of a payoff, how about getting paid for getting healthy?

 
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Pere Florensa's curator insight, December 13, 2013 4:22 AM

En nuestro blog, nosotros nos atrevimos a hacer nuestras predicciones sobre salud y marketing:

http://healthyadvertising.es/tendencias-del-marketing-farmaceutico-2014/

Sky Sirewest's curator insight, December 18, 2013 11:44 AM

Cutting edge way to get complete nutrition in a delicious protein shake.  Dairy & non- dairy. Chocolate or Vanilla!  I was wondering why my friend would tell me " Call me back in 10 minutes, I'm about to eat my dinner " One day I confronted him about eating too fast. Then he told  me his secret!  Not to mention that he is now a perfect weight &  back in olympic shape!   He has been drinking one to two meals a day. See more here:   Athletes video featuring protein shake: 

http://healthtips180.isagenix.com/us/en/isavideos_athletes.dhtml ;

Shakes:  Non-dairy Berry Flavor  http://healthtips180.isagenix.com/us/en/natural_berry_harvest_shake.html ;

Dairy Shakes   Creamy French Vanilla  Creamy Dutch Chocolate http://healthtips180.isagenix.com/us/en/isaleanshake_new.dhtml ;

Kosher Shake  http://healthtips180.isagenix.com/us/en/koshershake.dhtml ;

 

Use Product B Nutritional age-reversal product as a foundation for everything.

http://healthtips180.isagenix.com/us/en/product_b.html

More on Nobel Prize break-thru: www.a-genetic-wonder.blogspot.com   

Ekaterina's curator insight, December 18, 2013 8:59 PM

5 Health Tech Trends to Watch in 2014

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The car mechanic who uncorked a childbirth revolution

The car mechanic who uncorked a childbirth revolution | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
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Key principles of digital health

Key principles of digital health | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

'Progress in digital health will be driven by front-line innovators, enabling technologies, engaged patients, and substantial collaboration between impassioned partners'


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Frontline innovators, enabling technologies, engaged patients and collaboration are the key elements for digital health

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Andrew Spong's curator insight, November 28, 2013 10:29 AM

That all sounds reassuringly contemporary and progressive until we get to the collaboration element (and let's find a synonym for 'passionate', for the love of whatever deity you observe).

 

If these initiatives are going to be funded by old-think VC weasels, we're blithely harnessing the freedom to innovate with the shackles of our disastrous financial past.

 

We demand digital health innovation.

 

We also need to demand clean, ethical, transparent, crowd-sourced, equity-driven funding for health innovation, not dirty money from faceless money men.

 

Innovators need funders with a face, not funding at any price.

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Apple's Latest Acquisition Could Be Medtech Game Changer | Qmed

Apple's Latest Acquisition Could Be Medtech Game Changer | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Recently acquired 3-D sensing technology could make computing giant Apple an even more disruptive force when it comes to healthcare technology.

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Glasses That Let Nurses Get Under Your Skin | Qmed

Glasses That Let Nurses Get Under Your Skin | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Qmed (formerly Medical Device Link) is the world's first completely prequalified supplier directory and news source for medical device OEMs. Find medical device suppliers and IVD suppliers who are FDA-registered, ISO 13485- and ISO 9001-certified.
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Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, December 7, 2013 11:00 AM

Wow, suena muy bien!  Seguramente, habrá muchos pacientes agradecidos! El asunto, pienso, es quién va a comprar estas antiparras para enfermeros. ¿Los profesionales de enfermería, los hospitales, clínicas...???

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Leveraging Mobile Health Technolog for Patient Recruitment An Emerging Opportunity


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eMedToday's curator insight, November 20, 2013 7:51 PM

Mobile phones are great way to do surveys.

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Trend Report: The Future of Health, Fitness and Wellness!

Trend Report: The Future of Health, Fitness and Wellness! | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Related posts: When Silicon Valley Takes Over Health Care Innovation … Getting healthcare out of GroundHog Day Wireless & mobile health: A massive business model disruptor!
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The perfect storm for wellness apps is here!

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Epic: Patient engagement is the “last mile” for EHRs

Epic: Patient engagement is the “last mile” for EHRs | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Patient engagement was a major theme of the Partners Connected Health Symposium, and that theme came to a head Thursday with a talk from Epic President Carl Dvorak, who contends that for electronic health records like Epic, engagement with the patients is “the last mile,” the home stretch EHR vendors are currently embarking on.

Everything Epic does to innovate, Dvorak said, he assumes will soon become standard for EHR systems, just like car stereos were once a feature you had to purchase separately and now are just assumed to be part of a new car.

“Today’s leaves become tomorrow’s branches,” he said.

Dvorak talked about a number of patient engagement tools that are already available through Epic and its MyChart patient-facing app, but also previewed some new pieces the company is working on.

Scheduling appointments, for instance, is a key functionality for a patient-interfacing EHR. But beyond just allowing a patient to schedule a visit, Dvorak wants to use the power of mobile to offer wait-listed patients quicker appointments if one opens up, as a push notification on the patient’s app.

Another point Dvorak stressed was communicating with the patient in a variety of ways, whether that means offering multiple languages or offering multiple contact points. At Epic, he said, they are integrating the contact methods so patients can flow seamlessly from one into another.

“We can step up a text to an interactive chat, and if it seems significant we can move it into a phone call, or a video visit, or bring them in,” he said.

An early pilot of video visits via MyChart started a few weeks ago at Stanford, Dvorak said.

Dvorak talked about data analytics in the back end of the EHR, not just to help doctors with population management, but also to help patients with the choices they have to make about their own care.

In a system Dvorak demoed, a patient could track the outcomes from a treatment decision against historical results from other patients.

“So if I see I’m behind other people who made this choice, maybe I should have made a different choice,” he said.

One seldom-discussed avenue for interoperability is connecting patient EHRs to other patients’ EHRs in the system. Dvorak said that when patients are asked to complete a medical history, studies have shown they are 50 to 60 percent accurate about their parents’ health and only 20 to 30 percent accurate about their grandparents.

But as EHRs become more established, most patients’ parents and grandparents have medical records of their own. Epic is working on a system where families can opt in to share their medical history with one another in order to give children a more complete picture of their genetic disease background.

Finally, Dvorak spoke about the perennial hot topic with EHRs — integration. He said the company is working on new ways to make the EHR as open as possible while still being safe and secure.

As new payment models take hold, Dvorak said, accountable care won’t just mean holding doctors accountable for patient care, but also keeping patients accountable to their responsibilities in their own care. And that can be done by building as much engagement as possible into the EHR system.

“The biggest thing that needs to change is accountability for the patients,” he said. “We have to find a way to engage patients at a deeper level. And this is especially important when you’re at risk financially for that patient.”


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CDC looks to social media for disease trends

CDC looks to social media for disease trends | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

he Centers for Disease Control can envision a future where it uses social media as a data source for the early tracking of emerging diseases, but it's not without obstacles.

 

Nontraditional data sources are an increasing necessity caused by the great recent decline of public health staff at local governments, said Joanne Andreadis, senior advisor within the CDC Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. She spoke on a panel Oct. 28 during the annual ACT-IAC Executive Leadership Conference.

 

There's a lot of "accurate and verifiable information that we can use, whether it's social media or crowd-sourcing," echoed James Tyson, CDC chief of situational awareness. The center would like to get to the point where the agency has not just awareness of current situations, but is able to get in front of brewing epidemics, he added.

 

But social media in particular isn't without risk. Self-identified location in social media is notoriously unreliable, and incidents can attract tweeting or re-tweeting from a geographically dispersed audience.

In addition, crowdsourced data is subject to distortion--the previously unassailable Google Flu Trends famously overstated the prevalence of flu in 2012.

 

But, there is research underway on how to use network analysis--looking at the geographic indicators of connected members of a social network--that could potentially filter out social media from people not actually in a location, said Catherine Havasi, an MIT research scientist. Google Flu Trends, she added, is based on search queries, meaning that search trends may be a reflection of worries rather than fact, she added.


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