Innovation in Health
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A Comprehensive Overview of How Games Help Healthcare in 2013

A Comprehensive Overview of How Games Help Healthcare in 2013 | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
People often see games as bad for health but many institutions have been hard at work to make them work for us. Here are 6 ways games can help healthcare

Via Alex Butler
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José Manuel Taboada's curator insight, July 25, 2013 5:16 AM

#farmacia Gamification : Games working for health.

Innovation in Health
What's new in the world of health and wellness
Curated by Rowan Norrie
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The Top 10 Trends Shaping the Future of Pharma - The Medical Futurist

The Top 10 Trends Shaping the Future of Pharma - The Medical Futurist | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The medical community gradually acknowledges digital health but doesn't embrace it entirely. Familiarize yourself with the future of pharma!
Via Matthieu BOYER
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Six initiatives opening up health innovation around the world | Nesta

Six initiatives opening up health innovation around the world | Nesta | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
How governments, practitioners, patients and citizens around the world are collaborating in new ways to open up health innovation
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You Don’t Need to Choose a Methodology to Innovate

You Don’t Need to Choose a Methodology to Innovate | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Which method do you choose? Design Thinking? Agile? Lean Startup? Answer: All? None? Who cares?!


Via Peter Verschuere
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How tech-enabled consumers are reordering the healthcare landscape | McKinsey & Company

How tech-enabled consumers are reordering the healthcare landscape | McKinsey & Company | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Healthcare companies are developing new digital technologies to give consumers more control over the care they receive. That could upend the industry’s move toward greater consolidation and scale.
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Swallowing “smart” bacteria could be a new way to treat disease

Swallowing “smart” bacteria could be a new way to treat disease | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Synthetic biologists are developing genetically modified bacteria that you swallow, but no one knows yet how they should be regulated.
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The 10 Most Promising Medical Technologies of 2016 | Qmed

The 10 Most Promising Medical Technologies of 2016 | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
From using gene-editing therapy in human beings to device-delivered pain management to biodegradable brain sensors, there are many promising medical device technologies to point to so far this year.
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2 Alarming Findings About How Poor Sleep Hurts Your Heart

2 Alarming Findings About How Poor Sleep Hurts Your Heart | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Multiple studies have shown that poor sleep can up your risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and cancer. But two new studies published last week — one in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine and the other in the journal Scientific Reports — uncover two more pieces of the puzzle. One reports poor sleep may actually increase the risk for engaging in behaviors that put a person at risk for these chronic diseases to begin with. And the second reports that poor sleep actually changes the way the body gets rid of cholesterol, and likely plays a role in increasing your risk of developing heart disease.

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Futuristic Medical Technology That Will Amaze You | Qmed

Futuristic Medical Technology That Will Amaze You | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Qmed (formerly Medical Device Link) is the world's first completely prequalified supplier directory and news source for medical device OEMs. Find medical device suppliers and IVD suppliers who are FDA-registered, ISO 13485- and ISO 9001-certified. Qmed is also the home of Medical Product Manufacturing News and the most relevant breaking news for the medical device industry.
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Ten Predictions That Will Transform Healthcare | Insight & Intelligence™ | GEN

Ten Predictions That Will Transform Healthcare | Insight & Intelligence™ | GEN | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
3D Printing, Aid-in-Dying, Big Data Analytics, Gene Editing, and others are likely to reshape healthcare in coming years.
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7 Medical Device Failures Causing Serious Recalls | Qmed

7 Medical Device Failures Causing Serious Recalls | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Here are seven types of problems we’ve noticed in recent medical device recalls that FDA has deemed as Class I.
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Patients become citizen scientists | Nesta

Patients become citizen scientists | Nesta | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
2016 will bring a new generation of digitally-enabled and patient-led research, says John Loder
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The truth about that “your Googling and my medical degree” mug | e-Patients.net

The truth about that “your Googling and my medical degree” mug | e-Patients.net | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Listen, people: Googling does not mean I think I’m a doctor. It’s a sign of being an engaged, empowered “e-patient.” 

I partner with great doctors – I don’t tell them what to do. And they welcome me doing it.

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Social media insights into the patient journey

Social media insights into the patient journey | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

This series examines five ways in which social media is having an impact on the pharmaceutical and medical device industries, focusing on how it can be harnessed to help traditional methods of patient engagement move forward. This third article examines how social media can give a better understanding of the patient journey.

 

 

Figure 1. Extract from Jenni's Guts blog about living with Crohn's Disease and other conditions.


In his article on patient centricity, Chris McCourt says, 'the age of patient-centricity and participatory medicine is fully underway; while debate continues as to what exactly patient-centricity constitutes, social media is helping patients play a much more active role in their healthcare than in the past.'

As discussed in an earlier post, more and more people are going online to understand and diagnose their symptoms. A recent survey by the European Commission found that 75 per cent of respondents think the internet is a good way of finding out more about health, with 90 per cent of these feeling that the information they got online helped them to improve their knowledge about health-related topics. Further research suggests that 43 per cent of visits to hospitals or clinical sites originate from a search engine. Therefore social media presents many exciting possibilities for mapping the patient journey in more detail than traditional methods, providing natural and unsolicited data directly from the patients themselves.

Google, Yahoo Answers, chatrooms, forums, groups and patient-centric forums such asPatientsLikeMe are all brimming with information directly from patients about how they are reacting to treatments, how their condition affects them day-to-day while providing insights into their milestones, barriers, achievements and how they support each other and are supported.

Such information can help healthcare providers better understand the reasons behind patients abandoning their treatment, for example, which can assist them in supporting patients through the more difficult stages and encourage their continued engagement.

Filling the gaps

Information readily available on social media can highlight gaps in patient knowledge. This can help healthcare providers produce revised materials to help educate them on their condition and further mitigate the confusion and anger that can result from feeling alone and unprepared. We are facing an increasingly well-connected and better-informed population of patients in an age of Patient-Reported Outcomes and a largely outcomes-based system of healthcare provision. Therefore all such information deserves serious attention in the fight to improve and centralise healthcare.

Cultural differences

Social media lets patients discuss their problems, highlights and concerns in their own language with people from their own culture. Figures 2 and 3, taken from a presentation given by Liesl Leary at the DIA conference in Paris this year, demonstrate how language and culture can have a huge influence not only on the nature of reporting, but also on the significance ascribed by different people of different cultures to the same symptoms of a condition. Exploring this data can help caregivers understand the attitudes of patients from these different backgrounds and thereby adapt healthcare and support provision accordingly.

 



Figure 2. Cultural contrasts must be taken into account.

 




Figure 3. Tactics can be established based on listening to patients' needs.



But there are further applications of social media and patient engagement. For example, look at the blog 'Jenni's Guts', in which Jenni speaks openly of her Crohn's disease, fibromyalgia and depression. It has attracted 86,731 views to date (19/10/15) of her posts musing on her low points suffering from her various conditions (Figure 1), which attract moral support from fellow sufferers, guides on how she lives with her conditions (such as the ERPK, or Emergency Roadside Potty Kit) and, perhaps most interestingly from a medical professional's perspective, links clinical surveys which she promotes to her readers (Figure 4).



Figure 4. Jenni promotes research surveys to her thousands of followers.


Blogs such as this, along with patient forums, chat rooms, boards and various other social media platforms provide a concentrated pool of people who have a target condition and would be eligible for clinical trials. It is no surprise, then, that social media has become a patient recruitment tool for many forward-thinking companies.

Views of different age groups

As well as providing insights into the patient journey across cultures, social information can show patient focus in different age groups. Contrary to popular belief, it is not just 'millennials' who have an active online presence when it comes to healthcare. Studies show that not only are so-called 'boomers' active online when it comes to health, but they also tend to be further along in the patient journey, with more focus on obstacles, treatment risks and efficacy of medication.

Much as the patients' experience and attitudes are a central part of any patient journey analysis, an understanding of their culture and language must be at the centre of any recruitment strategy. Though these hubs of patient activity provide a great source of appropriate patients in trial recruitment, each country requires a separate strategy that is sensitive to linguistic nuance and cultural norms

 


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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The 4 Essential Elements of Device Design Today | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

The Medical Design Excellence Awards (MDEAs) attract entries from a wide variety of therapy areas, everything from over-the-counter products to cardiovascular technology to imaging devices. Yet every year, a few common refrains about what matters most in medical device design emerge from these disparate categories.

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State of Population Health Analytics

State of Population Health Analytics | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

The 2016 State of Population Health Analytics (SOPHA) study revealed that the healthcare industry is making progress, but at a slower pace than expected. This is due to the challenge of integrating multiple sources and types of data and a focus on the data and technology to the detriment of people, processes and leadership. Larger healthcare organizations are making more progress than smaller ones due to their greater access to resources.


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Futuristic Intelligent Knife tells Surgeon if tissue is Cancerous

Futuristic Intelligent Knife tells Surgeon if tissue is Cancerous | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
A video feauring a Futuristic Intelligent Knife that tells Surgeon if tissue is Cancerous

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The future of medicine won’t be about "health apps"

The future of medicine won’t be about "health apps" | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

In the unconscious mind, an "app" is a small program available on smartphone, offered either for free or for less than a euro, and that gives a service. In health care, this simple question of wording has therefore a pejorative connotation of "gadget".

Thus, the specialized and general media often list the Top 10 or Top 20 most useful health apps, mixing indifferently medical specialties: choose an app, choose a disease.

Should we list the Moovcare solution which demonstrated a very significant improvement in the survival of patients suffering from lung cancer alongside other medical "apps" giving information for instance about pregnancy simply because they use the same technology?

 


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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5 Challenges of Moving Medtech to the Home | Qmed

5 Challenges of Moving Medtech to the Home | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Medical devices are increasingly moving out of healthcare settings and into people's homes. Here are five pitfalls that device designers should watch out for, courtesy of Kenneth Fine, president of Proven Process Medical

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10 Electronic Breakthroughs You Should Know | Qmed

10 Electronic Breakthroughs You Should Know | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

The field of electronics continues to evolve at an exponential rate despite many pundits’ declaration that Moore’s law is dead. In any event, it is still certainly hard to keep up with all of the advances in the field of electronics. Here, we present an artificially intelligent mobile chip, dissolving implantable electronics, and a host of other advances.

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5 Reasons Why Medical Device Innovation Is So Tough | Qmed

5 Reasons Why Medical Device Innovation Is So Tough | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Financial costs and regulations are reasons, but there’s much more, says medical device industry expert Bill Betten.
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Top 7 Health Technologies at CES 2016

Top 7 Health Technologies at CES 2016 | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The CES technology show recently took place in Las Vegas. The show, well-known for its gadget news and video games, also featured exciting medical innovations. Forget about another dozen fitness wearables or new generation smartwatches – the top 7 breakthroughs are truly inspiring steps forward. 1) L'Oréal helps prevent skin cancer A smart patch developed…
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The Future of Medical Technology according to Ray Kurzweil | Qmed

The Future of Medical Technology according to Ray Kurzweil | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Ray Kurzweil has made a name for himself for making outlandish technology forecasts, many of which have proven accurate. Here, we summarize some of his predictions that could have the largest implications on medicine.

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How pharma can keep up as healthcare goes digital

How pharma can keep up as healthcare goes digital | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
One of the biggest ways the changing digital health landscape will affect the pharma industry is that pharma companies increasingly stand to lose control over their own stories, according to a new report from McKinsey & Company, who spoke to 20 thought leaders in various pharma-adjacent sectors.

Via COUCH Medcomms, PatientView, Rainmaker Healthcare Communications
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How the Internet of Things will revolutionise medicine

How the Internet of Things will revolutionise medicine | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
How the Internet of Things will revolutionise medicine | From more advanced wearables to homes and bodies full of sensors, the Internet of Things is promising to give the healthcare industry its biggest check-up yet. Buying advice from the leading technology site
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Innovation is only way to meet future food challenges, says PepsiCo’s top scientist | Food Business News

Innovation is only way to meet future food challenges, says PepsiCo’s top scientist | Food Business News | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
News, Markets and Analysis for the Food Processing Industry

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