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10 Examples of Mobile Health Around the World

10 Examples of Mobile Health Around the World | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Health care workers in the developing world are using mobile phones to address critical health needs ranging from maternal mortality to HIV testing to clean water. Here are 10 examples of mobile health around the world.


Via Gilles Jourquin, Sam Stern, dbtmobile
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Innovation in Health
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Curated by Rowan Norrie
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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from Social Media and Healthcare
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But are doctors really on social media?

But are doctors really on social media? | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

via This is a question that we healthcare communicators have been fielding from clients (and, frankly, discussing among ourselves) since the advent of social media as we try to engage with healthcare professionals. Some have maintained that physicians’ level of tech-savvy rivals the quality of their handwriting – not so great. Forced to be connected only by the mandate of electronic health records, physicians aren’t active online due to packed appointment schedules, privacy concerns or the desire to remain unbiased as related to their health system or practice.

 

A new report by my colleague Greg Matthews, called “Missing the Forest For the Trees”, lays this old stereotype to bed. According to a 2012 study by the Journal of Medical Internet Research, cited by Matthews, 61% of physicians scan social media for medical information weekly, while another 46% contribute to that information on a weekly basis. In addition, online social channels are having an impact on clinical decisions – according to a Manhattan Research study also cited in the book, 39% of doctors say that the information they receive from social channels is influential to very influential on their clinical decisions. I don’t want to give away too much of “Missing the Forest For the Trees” – it’s a quick, worthwhile read – but all these stats point to our need, as healthcare companies and communicators, to be online learning from and engaging with doctors. Physician-directed content strategy for platforms such as Twitter and LinkedIn, will be seen by physicians, and sponsored ads make it easier than ever to target the right ones. Matthews makes another critical point – there is a tremendous opportunity for companies to harness the power of online physician advocates, engaging them to spread the word about our therapy, device or awareness building effort. Physicians are our “citizen” journalists.

 

Matthews has led the development of MDigitalLife, a database that has indexed the digital footprints of nearly a half-million physicians around the world. This data can be harnessed by healthcare companies in a myriad of ways including influencer identification and conversation analysis. MDigitalLife is also a great source for research about physician online activity with a treasure trove of free resources on its website. Social media is not new, but this way of thinking about physicians on social media is, and healthcare companies who engage physicians through social media very well may find a new partner in spreading the word. - See more at: http://brewlife.com/insights/doctors-really-social-media/#sthash.517J8QKg.dpuf

 


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Rowan Norrie's insight:

How well are you engaging with clinicians on social media? A widely untapped source of information

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"Meaningfully engaging patients and families as true partners in their care remains the exception, not the rule"

"Meaningfully engaging patients and families as true partners in their care remains the exception, not the rule" | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

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Art Jones's curator insight, October 20, 12:49 PM

If patient engagement is the wonder drug of the 21st century why are we having such a hard time engaging?

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Dos and Don'ts of Medical Device Design | Qmed

Whether it’s striving for simplicity in design or recognizing that people are capable of countless mistakes while using something, Qmed has collected feedback from our audience and added it to our list of dos and don’ts.

Rowan Norrie's insight:

Excellent guidelines for managing medtech design. If you follow all of these you will eliminate most of the reasons why medtech products fail in market or even before launch.

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5 Technologies Cutting through mHealth Hype | Qmed

5 Technologies Cutting through mHealth Hype | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Five recent news stories suggest that more productive uses for mobile health could be on the way, potentially opening up the technology’s user base in the long term.

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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
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Ralph Lauren Polo Tech biometric smart shirt latest in wearable tech

Ralph Lauren Polo Tech biometric smart shirt latest in wearable tech | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Ralph Lauren is debuting its first biometric smart shirt at this year's U.S. Open tennis championships. The shirt aims to revolutionize the wearable tech sector.

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 31, 12:05 AM

The shirt comes with no plugs and no wires, making it wearable in a myriad of situations, including top-level athletic endeavors. It employs bio-sensing silver fibers that are then put into the nylon compression material. Data goes from the shirt to an attached black box (that you remove and recharge before you throw the shirt in the wash) to an app on your smartphone or tablet. It is able to track heart rate, breathing levels, stress, the number of steps a person has taken and the amount of calories burned.

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Sniffing out the allergy epidemic

Sniffing out the allergy epidemic | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

One in three of us is allergic. From grass pollen to latex, peanuts to pets, allergies send 20,000 of people in England to hospital every year. But generations before did not suffer from this epidemic, so what is it that's making us so allergic in our modern world?

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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from The patient movement
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Handle with care: patient-centric market research - PMLiVE

Handle with care: patient-centric market research - PMLiVE | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Working with patients to gather insight aimed at transforming brand communications can be a delicate business

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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from Doctors Hub
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GSK's new web effort hopes to help patients better cope with COPD

GSK's new web effort hopes to help patients better cope with COPD | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
GlaxoSmithKline, better known as GSK, has launched a new web effort aimed at providing both information and inspiration for people with coronary obstructive pulmonary disease, in what the company says is arguably the most engaging platform in the marketplace.

Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from Pharmabook
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Medication management goes digital

Medication management goes digital | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Medication management for patients, as well as their physicians and pharmacists, is going digital.

Via Philippe Loizon
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John Lemos Forman's curator insight, August 11, 3:19 PM

São inúmeras as possibilidades de uso das TICs em benefício tanto dos pacientes como dos gestores das unidades de saúde.

Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from Patient Hub
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Quatre applications destinées aux seniors

Quatre applications destinées aux seniors | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Il n'y en a pas que pour les bébés et les sportifs. Papy et mamie ont eux aussi droit à leurs applications, que ce soit pour suivre une maladie ou se tester...

Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from eHealth - Social Business in Health
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Survey: 75 percent of patients want digital health services | mobihealthnews

Survey: 75 percent of patients want digital health services | mobihealthnews | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

According to a survey of thousands of patients in Germany, Singapore, and the United Kingdom, the adoption of digital healthcare services remains low because existing services are either low quality or not meeting patients’ needs. The survey, conducted by consulting firm McKinsey, included responses from at least 1,000 patients in the three countries.

“Many healthcare executives believe that, due to the sensitive nature of medical care, patients don’t want to use digital services except in a few specific situations; decision makers often cite data that point to relatively low usage of digital healthcare services,” McKinsey analysts Stefan Biesdorf and Florian Niedermann wrote in a recent blog post. “In fact, the results of our survey reveal something quite different. The reason patients are slow to adopt digital healthcare is primarily because existing services don’t meet their needs or because they are of poor quality.” 

McKinsey found that more than 75 percent of respondents would like to use some kind of digital health service. Many are interested in “mundane” offerings, the firm wrote.

 

 


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rob halkes's curator insight, July 16, 7:18 AM

Great Survey results, aligning with what experts already thought. Results generated by Germany, Singapore and the UK, but believed to be representative of patients in these advanced markets.


See my conclusions upon reading the report here

Honeywell HomMed's curator insight, July 25, 10:01 AM

With our LifeStream View, care providers can grant access to patient’s health information through the creation of patient portals, which can be configured for: Physicians, Care Providers and Families. Learn more: bit.ly/1lDmuiK

Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, July 25, 10:32 AM

Los resultados de una encuesta parecen derribar algunos mitos respecto de la "salud móvil" o m-health como "Esta tecnología solo la usan los jóvenes".

Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from Latest mHealth News
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10 Digital Health Trends Over The Next 20 Years

10 Digital Health Trends Over The Next 20 Years | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Earlier this week I participated in the world’s first online digital health conference, Digital Health Pulse, organized by digital health consultancy, Enspektos. Speaking at the ...

Via Sam Stern
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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from Digital Health
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Health innovation: When big ideas meet big pharma

Health innovation: When big ideas meet big pharma | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

After attending OPEN Health's inaugural 'Health Innovation: Big Ideas' event in London, Paul Tunnah outlines some of the concepts that could be game changers for the pharma industry and the broader future of healthcare. 


Via Alex Butler
Rowan Norrie's insight:

Cosnider this - "Today's 10-year olds could be the first generation to have a lower life expectancy than their parents."

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5 Factors That Could Cost Medtech $34B by 2020 | Qmed

5 Factors That Could Cost Medtech $34B by 2020 | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

The big uptick in medtech megamergers is just the beginning of a profound set of changes facing the medical device industry, according to a new report from ATKearney. The industry’s profit margins are set to fall drastically, falling nine points from 25% in 2012 to 16% by 2020, the report predicts.

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Invisibles, Not Wearables, Will Profoundly Change Health Care

In the near future, invisible health-tracking technology will replace wearables, like the Apple Watch, available now.
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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from [epatient - patient empowerment - health literacy - patients < > healthcare providers face to face & digital communication | patient expert - éducation thérapeutique - démocratie sanitaire - santé participative] by VAB Traductions
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The rise of the digital patient (Infographic) | Integrated Care Today

The rise of the digital patient (Infographic) | Integrated Care Today | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Take a look at this infographic from CDW Healthcare to see how American's are adopting technology to improve their health.

Via VAB Traductions
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Ginny Dillon's curator insight, September 19, 11:17 PM

So much technology. It's a great opportunity for patients.

Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from eHealth - Social Business in Health
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Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential

Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Vol. 7, Issue 1 Jan. 2013.

El-Gayar, Timsina and Nawar.


ABSTRACT

Background:
Advancements in smartphone technology coupled with the proliferation of data connectivity has resulted in increased interest and unprecedented growth in mobile applications for diabetes self-management. The objective of this article is to determine, in a systematic review, whether diabetes applications have been helping patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes self-manage their condition and to identify issues necessary for large-scale adoption of such interventions.
Methods:
The review covers commercial applications available on the Apple App Store (as a representative of commercially available applications) and articles published in relevant databases covering a period fromJanuary 1995 to August 2012. The review included all applications supporting any diabetes self-management task where the patient is the primary actor.
Results:
Available applications support self-management tasks such as physical exercise, insulin dosage or medication, blood glucose testing, and diet. Other support tasks considered include decision support, notification/alert, tagging of input data, and integration with social media. The review points to the potential for mobile applications to have a positive impact on diabetes self-management. Analysis indicates that application usage is associated with improved attitudes favorable to diabetes self-management. Limitations of the applications include lack of personalized feedback; usability issues, particularly the ease of data entry; and integration with patients and electronic health records.
Conclusions:
Research into the adoption and use of user-centered and sociotechnical design principles is needed to improve usability, perceived usefulness, and, ultimately, adoption of the technology. Proliferation and efficacy of interventions involving mobile applications will benefit from a holistic approach that takes into account patients’ expectations and providers’ needs.


J Diabetes Sci Technol 2013;7(1):247–262    


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rob halkes's curator insight, August 29, 10:29 AM

There is good perspective to mobile health (ehealth) applications to self management in diabetes. However, as this research review suggests: we need to know more about use and socio technological influences. As I repeat myself: ehealth mhealth is NOT about technology: it is about implementation. Let's go for that!

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How Apple Could Disrupt Healthcare | Qmed

How Apple Could Disrupt Healthcare | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Apple is currently in talks with electronic health record provider, Allscripts, as well as several hospitals, in an effort to discuss the use of its cloud-based health information platform known as HealthKit.

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1. Do It: Try to Make the Device as Easy as Possible to Use. | Qmed

1. Do It: Try to Make the Device as Easy as Possible to Use. | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Whether it’s striving for simplicity in design or recognizing that people are capable of countless mistakes while using something, Qmed has collected plenty of tips on medical device design. Here are four dos and three don’ts to get you started.

Rowan Norrie's insight:

All MedTech companies developing new products should read this!

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How often do consumers use digital health tools? This graph will show you

How often do consumers use digital health tools? This graph will show you | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
A chart by Parks Associates followed up an infographic on consumer's use of digital health tools this week with a chart showing how frequency they used them in the past year.

Via Philippe Loizon
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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from Digital Health
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Sensors And Sensitivity

Sensors And Sensitivity | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

This is the sensible trajectory of connected sensor technology. The world around us gains the ability to perceive us, rather than wearable sensors trying to figure out what’s going on in our environment by taking a continuous measure of us.


Via Alex Butler
Rowan Norrie's insight:

A useful lesson - wearables should not just be about harvesting data for the sake of it. By incorporating into objects we are in contact with, e.g. seat belts, we can make it a seamless part of our everyday life to gather information when it really matters.

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Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from Digitized Health
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Johnson & Johnson partners with Organovo to consider 3D-printing living tissue

Johnson & Johnson partners with Organovo to consider 3D-printing living tissue | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The partnership centers around using bioprinted tissue to discover new drugs. The announcement comes ahead of Organovo's commercial launch later this year.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
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Loic Bertin's curator insight, July 28, 1:01 AM

Acélébration des partenariats santé et technologie. 

Rescooped by Rowan Norrie from healthcare technology
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Can Mobile Technologies and Big Data Improve Health?

Can Mobile Technologies and Big Data Improve Health? | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

After decades as a technological laggard, medicine has entered its data age. Mobile technologies, sensors, genome sequencing, and advances in analytic software now make it possible to capture vast amounts of information about our individual makeup and the environment around us. The sum of this information could transform medicine, turning a field aimed at treating the average patient into one that’s customized to each person while shifting more control and responsibility from doctors to patients.

 

The question is: can big data make health care better?

 

“There is a lot of data being gathered. That’s not enough,” says Ed Martin, interim director of the Information Services Unit at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. “It’s really about coming up with applications that make data actionable.”

 

The business opportunity in making sense of that data—potentially $300 billion to $450 billion a year, according to consultants McKinsey & Company—is driving well-established companies like Apple, Qualcomm, and IBM to invest in technologies from data-capturing smartphone apps to billion-dollar analytical systems. It’s feeding the rising enthusiasm for startups as well.

 

Venture capital firms like Greylock Partners and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, as well as the corporate venture funds of Google, Samsung, Merck, and others, have invested more than $3 billion in health-care information technology since the beginning of 2013—a rapid acceleration from previous years, according to data from Mercom Capital Group. 

  more at http://www.technologyreview.com/news/529011/can-technology-fix-medicine/ ;
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Paul's curator insight, July 24, 12:06 PM

Yes - but bad data/analysis can harm it

Pedro Yiakoumi's curator insight, July 24, 1:48 PM

http://theinnovationenterprise.com/summits/big-data-boston-2014

Vigisys's curator insight, July 27, 4:34 AM

La collecte de données de santé tout azimut, même à l'échelle de big data, et l'analyse de grands sets de données est certainement utile pour formuler des hypothèses de départ qui guideront la recherche. Ou permettront d'optimiser certains processus pour une meilleure efficacité. Mais entre deux, une recherche raisonnée et humaine reste indispensable pour réaliser les "vraies" découvertes. De nombreuses études du passé (bien avant le big data) l'ont démontré...

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Bio-bots Flex Their Muscles | Qmed

Bio-bots Flex Their Muscles | Qmed | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

In 2012, scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign created a walking biological robot powered by cells from the heart. The heart cells proved capable of generating movement in the small bio-bots (measuring less than a centimeter in height), but controlling the bot proved difficult as the cells are programmed to beat continuously. In addition, it was difficult to turn those robots on or off.

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