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Innovation in Health
What's new in the world of health and wellness
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Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine

Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Digital medicine is poised to transform biomedical research, clinical practice and the commercial sector. Here we introduce a monthly column from R&D/venture creation firm PureTech tracking digital medicine's emergence.

 

Technology has already transformed the social fabric of life in the twenty-first century. It is now poised to profoundly influence disease management and healthcare. Beyond the hype of the 'mobile health' and 'wearable technology' movement, the ability to monitor our bodies and continuously gather data about human biology suggests new possibilities for both biomedical research and clinical practice. Just as the Human Genome Project ushered in the age of high-throughput genotyping, the ability to automate, continuously record, analyze and share standardized physiological and biological data augurs the beginning of a new era—that of high-throughput human phenotyping.


These advances are prompting new approaches to research and medicine, but they are also raising questions and posing challenges for existing healthcare delivery systems. How will these technologies alter biomedical research approaches, what types of experimental questions will researchers now be able to ask and what types of training will be needed? Will the ability to digitize individual characteristics and communicate by mobile technology empower patients and enable the modification of disease-promoting behaviors; at the same time, will it threaten patient privacy? Will doctors be prescribing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared apps on a regular basis, not just to monitor and manage chronic disease but also to preempt acute disease episodes? Will the shift in the balance between disease treatment and early intervention have a broad economic impact on the healthcare system? How will the emergence of these new technologies reshape the healthcare industry and its underlying business models? What will be the defining characteristics of 'winning' products and companies?


These are just some of the questions we plan to ask over the coming months. In the meantime, we introduce here some of the key themes shaping R&D in the digital medicine field and focus on what they might mean for the biopharmaceutical and diagnostic/device industries.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Risto Suoknuuti's curator insight, May 17, 4:23 AM

Man made machines for mans use. Systems simplyfies after getting complex. This is the rule in the winning game.

Ed Crowley's curator insight, May 17, 8:30 AM

Wearable medical technology is quickly changing the potential for health research, and with IoT, health management. 

Be-Bound®'s curator insight, May 18, 9:54 AM

And this is just the beginning ! 

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The Future of Wearables Isn't a Connected Watch | WIRED

The Future of Wearables Isn't a Connected Watch | WIRED | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The Future of Wearables Isn’t a Connected Watch

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Gary Hayes's curator insight, February 2, 7:19 PM

Quote "Well, wearables are about to explode into an array of novel, single-function devices. They will suit discrete situations rather than peeling off multiple functions from your phone—it’s use-case engineering. Think of activity-specific clothing, like Hexoskin, that monitors workouts. Or medical devices like Vital Connect, a patch that tracks your vital signs and lets doctors access the data. Or earbuds that aren’t quite hearing aids but which you can wear when there’s too much background noise."

Richard Platt's curator insight, February 3, 7:08 PM

The title of the post says it all, real need and delivering value to the user.  "Wearables are about to explode into an array of novel, single-function devices. They will suit discrete situations rather than peeling off multiple functions from your phone—it’s use-case engineering. Think of activity-specific clothing, like Hexoskin, that monitors workouts. Or medical devices like Vital Connect, a patch that tracks your vital signs and lets doctors access the data. Or earbuds that aren’t quite hearing aids but which you can wear when there’s too much background noise."

Vivalist's curator insight, February 5, 4:53 AM

"Intel thinks wearables will be more ubiquitous than computers or phones. And it’s right. You won’t have just one wearable—you’ll have dozens. The biggest mistake everyone makes is assuming we’re going to wear the same one all the time.

That’s because, traditionally, wearables have done bits and pieces of what our phones already do. Aside from tracking movements, what are these bands and glasses besides proxy screens for our phones?

Well, wearables are about to explode into an array of novel, single-function devices. They will suit discrete situations rather than peeling off multiple functions from your phone—it’s use-case engineering."

 

interesting article on the future of wearables 

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Invisibles, Not Wearables, Will Profoundly Change Health Care

In the near future, invisible health-tracking technology will replace wearables, like the Apple Watch, available now.
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Ralph Lauren Polo Tech biometric smart shirt latest in wearable tech

Ralph Lauren Polo Tech biometric smart shirt latest in wearable tech | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Ralph Lauren is debuting its first biometric smart shirt at this year's U.S. Open tennis championships. The shirt aims to revolutionize the wearable tech sector.

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 31, 2014 12:05 AM

The shirt comes with no plugs and no wires, making it wearable in a myriad of situations, including top-level athletic endeavors. It employs bio-sensing silver fibers that are then put into the nylon compression material. Data goes from the shirt to an attached black box (that you remove and recharge before you throw the shirt in the wash) to an app on your smartphone or tablet. It is able to track heart rate, breathing levels, stress, the number of steps a person has taken and the amount of calories burned.

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Health innovation: When big ideas meet big pharma

Health innovation: When big ideas meet big pharma | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

After attending OPEN Health's inaugural 'Health Innovation: Big Ideas' event in London, Paul Tunnah outlines some of the concepts that could be game changers for the pharma industry and the broader future of healthcare. 


Via Alex Butler
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Cosnider this - "Today's 10-year olds could be the first generation to have a lower life expectancy than their parents."

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Intel's CEO looks to hobbyists for wearable innovations

Intel's CEO looks to hobbyists for wearable innovations | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
SAN MATEO, California (Reuters) - Intel Corp's Chief Executive Officer Brian Krzanich mingled with electronics buffs at Silicon Valley's annual maker mecca on Saturday as the chipmaker looks to amateur

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, May 18, 2014 5:07 PM

Intel is not the only technology company to look to the growing maker movement for inspiration but it has been among the most aggressive. ARM Holdings, Atmel and other chipmakers all have exhibitions at the weekend event to make sure that hobbyists are up to speed on their latest components.  - "These are the future engineers, the future scientists, the guys who will be inventing the next companies that create great products, whether it's the next Google or Apple. We want them to be aware of Intel technology," Krzanich said.

Ivan Frain's curator insight, May 19, 2014 3:19 AM

Hobbyists the new strategic target of Intel to push Edison, the Intel's iot processor. 

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Could wearables become bigger than tablets? - Fortune Tech

Could wearables become bigger than tablets? - Fortune Tech | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The market forecast for mobile gadgets worn on your wrist, hip, or head is stellar, and tech's biggest players are preparing for the rush.
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Smart jewelry could save your life someday

Smart jewelry could save your life someday | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Women facing imminent danger when walking down the street or getting into their cars will soon have new safety options in the booming wearables space.

 

Sense6, a five-member startup based in San Francisco, is unveiling jewelry pieces that sync to a user’s cellphone to alert authorities when the wearer encounters danger.

 

The device, which syncs via Bluetooth, simultaneously sends geolocation alerts to the phones of family members and loved ones at the touch of a button. Sense6′s smart jewelry also contains voice recorders that activate automatically and send the data in real time to the cloud.

 

more at http://venturebeat.com/2014/02/16/smart-jewelry-could-save-womens-lives/

 


Via nrip
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Laureen Turner's curator insight, February 17, 2014 6:12 PM

I love this idea 

 

Désiré Dupas's curator insight, October 20, 2014 4:14 PM

Sense6, a five-member startup based in San Francisco, is unveiling jewelry pieces that sync to a user’s cellphone to alert authorities when the wearer encounters danger.

Tamas Muller's curator insight, November 23, 2014 7:21 AM

Great idea for save more life and low a risk of any dangerous things...

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Six Fitness Problems Fitbit Won't Solve For You

Six Fitness Problems Fitbit Won't Solve For You | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Fitness technologies work best for people who are already motivated and have a disciplined fitness routine.
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tryndo's curator insight, May 12, 2014 11:16 AM

Les nouvelles Apps de fitness fonctionnent mieux avec les gens qui sont déjà motivés et qui ont déjà une routine physique rigoureuse.

 

Pour la plupart des gens, en particulier ceux qui n'ont pas encore découvert ce qui les motives réellement, ces applis de remise en forme sont malheureusement l'équivalent électronique des millions de tapis de course et de vélos elliptiques inutilisés qui encombrent de nombreux grenier français.

 

Voici donc en résumé les 6 choses qu’une App fitness ne vous aidera pas à faire :

 

1- Prioriser vos objectifs

 

En effet, ces petits dispositifs ne vous connaissent pas et ne peuvent pas vous aider à définir vos aspirations. Ce que vous aimez, ce que vous devez faire pour atteindre votre objectif (très personnel) et pourquoi vous devez le faire. Une appli ne vous aidera pas non plus à déterminer votre plan d'action à court et moyen terme.

 

2- Elaborer un plan

 

Les appareils de remise en forme vous permettent de suivre ce que vous avez fait, mais ils ne peuvent pas intervenir dans votre emploi du temps (amis, famille et exigences professionnelles)

Pour la plupart des gens, c'est l'étape la plus difficile parce que les plans ne doivent pas seulement être stratégique et méthodologique - ils doivent aussi être flexible et adaptable en fonction de votre vie.

 

3- Être déterminé 

 

Dans notre culture actuelle, il est beaucoup plus facile de blâmer que de prendre ses responsabilités, hors à long terme, une bonne routine physique passe par une détermination personnelle.

Arrêter les mauvais comportements est déjà assez dur, cela devient encore plus difficile lorsque vous le faites pour l'approbation et la satisfaction des autres, au lieu de le faire parce que c'est bon pour vous.

La meilleure des motivations provient de l'augmentation de l'estime de soi et ça une appli ne vous y aidera probablement pas.

 

4- Reconnaître vos propres efforts

 

Aucune stratégie de remise en forme n'est parfaite, et tout le monde atteints à un moment ou un autre un plateaux, généralement en dessous du seuil désiré.

Une application de remise en forme peut fournir une récompense émotionnelle par rapport à ce que vous avez fait sur une période donnée.

Néanmoins, arriver à ce niveau de satisfaction de soi nécessite un effort substantiel, et vous seul pouvez savoir quand vous avez vraiment donné tout ce que vous avez.

 

5- Pratiquer la pensée positive

 

Peu de choses sont aussi dommageable pour une stratégie de changement personnel que les pensées négatives.

 

La pensée positive est bien différente de la « positivité »  d’une App qui "vous parle" ou vous offre des badges au fur et à mesure que vous atteignez vos objectifs.

C'est une chose d'avoir votre application qui vous dis dans vos écouteurs: «Wow, vous avez fait fort",  s’en est une autre d'avoir votre moi intérieur qui fait l’éloge de vos progrès et vous encourage à vous dépasser. La première est amusante, la seconde vous rends autonome.

 

6- Faire des corrections de trajectoire

 

Les blessures, les maladies, le travail ou les crises personnelles se produisent.

Il faut parfois revoir ses plans.

Vous devez disposer de la compétence et d’une certaine détermination pour continuer, si vous devez prendre le temps de récupérer après une blessure par exemple ou, dans d'autres cas, accélérer votre plan. Une appli ne vous aidera pas à corriger votre trajectoire.

 

Pour résumer, la santé et le bien-être sont un état d'esprit, et pas seulement le résultat de pilules, de traitement ou d’applis.

Vous devez vous concentrer sur les fondamentaux, et une fois que vous les maîtrisez, amusez vous à déterminer quelles technologies de remise en forme utiliser, tout en sachant qu’il ne s’agit que d’accessoires.

Si vous n'avez pas envie de maîtriser les fondamentaux, la meilleure technologie au monde ne vous aidera pas à atteindre vos objectifs de remise en forme.

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Keeping healthy would be more fun with addictive mobile games

Keeping healthy would be more fun with addictive mobile games | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Blue Goji, the latest startup from serial entrepreneurs Kai and Charles Huang, posits that fitness would be more fun if addictive mobile games were layered on top of cardio workouts. Starting today, the company will learn just how many exercisers feel the same.

MyFitnessPal, the eight-year-old diet-and-exercise community, has partnered with Blue Goji for a “limited launch” that will give its users special benefits for being early adopters.


Via Alex Butler
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Murray McKercher's curator insight, October 14, 2013 8:10 PM

Healthy Addictive Mobile Games?

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13M wearables to be used in corporate wellness plans by 2018

13M wearables to be used in corporate wellness plans by 2018 | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Over the next five years, 13 million wearable devices embedded with wireless connectivity will be integrated into wellness plans offered by businesses, according to ABI research’s new report.

 

In 2013, principal analyst Jonathan Collins said less than 200,000 wearable devices have been integrated into wellness plans.

 

The report factors in the social and economic drivers supporting the integration of wearable wireless device adoption, such as the point at which people start taking more responsibility in healthcare, Collins told MobiHealthNews.

 

“While some device vendors are hoping that strong consumer awareness will drive corporate wellness adoption for their products, they also need to understand and focus on the most influential parts of the healthcare value chain,” Collins said.

 

More: http://mobihealthnews.com/25852/13m-wearables-to-be-used-in-corporate-wellness-plans-by-2018/

 
Via nrip
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Rowan Norrie's comment, September 28, 2013 5:59 AM
I agree regarding culture, but the main barrier is motivation, and as a recent convert to Fitbit, I think wearables are a big step forward.
Connected Digital Health & Life's curator insight, September 28, 2013 1:56 PM

I am wearing mine, are you?

Mike Rucker's curator insight, September 3, 2014 8:35 PM

Hopefully a good proportion of the 1,300,000 devices will not be simple pedometers and/or accelerometers. Looking forward to see where this might all go.

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What Device Makers Must Do to Make Wearables Work | EMDT - European Medical Device Technology

What Device Makers Must Do to Make Wearables Work | EMDT - European Medical Device Technology | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Medical device wearables are in the early stages of commercialization, but analysts and investors are very optimistic about their potential in the marketplace.
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Nine real technologies that will soon be inside you

Nine real technologies that will soon be inside you | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Given the frenzy of interest following the announcement of the Apple Watch, you might think wearables will be the next really important shift in technology. Not so.

Via FredColantonio
Rowan Norrie's insight:

Science fiction or soon-to-be reality?

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Richard Platt's curator insight, November 9, 2014 2:11 PM

Very interesting list

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Sensors And Sensitivity

Sensors And Sensitivity | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

This is the sensible trajectory of connected sensor technology. The world around us gains the ability to perceive us, rather than wearable sensors trying to figure out what’s going on in our environment by taking a continuous measure of us.


Via Alex Butler
Rowan Norrie's insight:

A useful lesson - wearables should not just be about harvesting data for the sake of it. By incorporating into objects we are in contact with, e.g. seat belts, we can make it a seamless part of our everyday life to gather information when it really matters.

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Nike abandons the FuelBand: What does this mean for wearables?

Nike abandons the FuelBand: What does this mean for wearables? | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The wearables industry will likely continue to consolidate as companies choose to join a side or get out of the way. With the recent news, Nike did both.
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Digital Prevention - Tech solutions stop consumers from having to suffer through minor health issues

Digital Prevention - Tech solutions stop consumers from having to suffer through minor health issues | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

Digital solutions are going to aid the modern consumer in the future for an experience that's more in-line with their digital lifestyle, convenient and offers a surplus of information on an individuals health. Individuals will soon be able to lean on digitally connected solutions to not only diagnose, but prevent health problems.

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Six futures for health data | Nesta

Six futures for health data | Nesta | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
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Future scenarios of how personal data from wearables might be utilised. Interesting that some groups imagined a cash value.

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Apple hires medical tech experts, fueling iWatch rumours

Apple hires medical tech experts, fueling iWatch rumours | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
A smartwatch with next-generation health skills could help Apple beat rivals in the wearable technology sector

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5 Ways Wearable Technology Will Impact Healthcare

5 Ways Wearable Technology Will Impact Healthcare | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
Wearable technology is an industry that continues to grow and adapt to meet the ever-changing needs of our world.

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Marco Antonio Gonzalez's curator insight, January 9, 2014 3:01 AM

About the eHeatlh from new visions in the nerwork 

Richard Platt's curator insight, January 13, 2014 2:49 PM

5 Ways Wearable Technology Will Impact Healthcare 

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Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier

Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it

A lot of the focus in wearable computing has been on delivering products that help everyday users monitor some of the more basic activity traits, such as steps taken and heart rate. While these are certainly useful metrics for health monitoring, they do not paint the full picture.

 

Computational biologists instead study the chemical changes that occur in people’s bodies with the help of optical sensors, non-invasive devices that use the red-to-near-infrared spectral region to assess the chemical changes that occur in the user’s blood vessels, among other places.

 

By leveraging this cutting-edge technology and wearable computing, we are equipped to understand the changes that occur in a person’s body at a whole new level. The implications of this change span from improved training of athletes to better management of chronic diseases and healthcare.

 

 Some interesting recent cases in research that show the potential for disruption include:

 

Researchers at the National Technical University of Athens have helped individuals self-manage diabetes by stimulating the function of an artificial pancreas with fully embedded wearable systems. A paper in the Journal of Biomechanics shows promising results for wearables in athletic training. Scientists mapped out the physiology of athletes’ ski-jumps in order to determine the biological constraints of each individual’s approach. By comparing data across 22 different skiiers, the scientists were able to determine that the wearable system was a very promising tool for training that captured information beyond the capacity of a traditional camera.Researchers at Texas A&M University are investigating the use of optical sensors to interact with dermally-implanted microparticle sensors. This technology could enable cost cutting and continuous blood chemistry monitoring.Optical sensors used to monitor both athletic performance and overall health by researchers at the Dublin Institute of Technology. The sophisticated sensors interpret user’s sweat particles in order to deduce what is going on at a biological level. One of the sensors measured pH levels of sweat particles in order to deduce dehydration while athletes were running. This is a huge stride for activity tracking because it represents real time monitoring of athletic performance and biological signals
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Sue Gould's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:43 AM

Wearable computers are here.  

Dan Baxter's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:20 AM

The next step for quantified and teleheath sensors

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Your Body Is The Computer

Your Body Is The Computer | Innovation in Health | Scoop.it
The last few years have presented an unprecedented shift in the computing world as PCs are being replaced with mobile devices. But now that a large portion of the market has already shifted, what comes after it?
Rowan Norrie's insight:

Really intersting article about future options for collecting and distributing data on your body.

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