Humanist Business
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Humanist Business
People are emotional first, logical second. Business must take this into account at all levels.
Curated by Jay Cross
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A Look Into The History Of Happiness

A Look Into The History Of Happiness | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Over the years, happiness has meant many other things, some of which are surprising when compared with our current sense of the word.
Jay Cross's insight:

Many definitions of happiness. 

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Finding Your 'Happiness Zone'

Finding Your 'Happiness Zone' | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Here is a key point that I have learned from devoting much of my professional life to studying the effects of human emotions: The raw, impulsive ones, like fear, excessive worry and anger will absolutely hi-jack happiness and well being -- every single...
Jay Cross's insight:

Good advice for countering stress.

Go to gratitude -- the minute you feel yourself starting to freak (like OMG it is going to be winter soon). Stop and find something to be grateful for. And if you can't think of anything, appreciate that you can see the words on this page.Be in the moment -- to the extent that you are able. Establish a daily discipline of some kind of practice like meditation or yoga to support you and reap the benefits.
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Safco Products's curator insight, July 5, 2013 9:42 AM

Interesting! Find your happiness zone!

Tina Sims, M.A., ACRW, CPRW, GCDF's curator insight, July 17, 2013 10:24 PM

There are only two things anyone can control: your thoughts and your actions! Get happy and reach for joy!

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Passion and the future of work - Trends in the Living Networks

Passion and the future of work - Trends in the Living Networks | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Jay Cross's insight:

Ross Dawson writes about passion at work. It's the magnet that will attract the best talent. I buy this 100%. 

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Safco Products's curator insight, June 26, 2013 10:58 AM

"In a connected world, almost all work can be done anywhere." 

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Amanda Palmer: The art of asking | Video on TED.com

Don't make people pay for music, says Amanda Palmer: Let them. In a passionate talk that begins in her days as a street performer (drop a dollar in the hat for the Eight-Foot Bride!), she examines the new relationship between artist and fan.
Jay Cross's insight:

Relationship with customers. Just ask. Trust. No sticker price. Patrons. How do we let people give? Open on the net shows Amanda & Company are good people, certainly worthy of a contribution. 

 

Not that you want to couchsurf with your fans. Nonetheless, an inspiring and important story.

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Living an Inspired Life - Mark Lamm ≫ BioSync Research Institute

Living an Inspired Life - Mark Lamm ≫ BioSync Research Institute | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
How do you live a truly inspired life? The secret elements consist of five “well-balance” points that nurture health and foster happiness.
Jay Cross's insight:

Corny but makes perfect sense. 

 

(This is a test of posting from Scoop.it to my Internet Time Blog.)

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Everything Is A Miracle, by Albert Einstein | Awakin.org

Everything Is A Miracle, by Albert Einstein | Awakin.org | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.
Jay Cross's insight:

"Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty."

 

"Only a life lived for others is worth living."

 

 
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Groundbreaking Study Shows That Intoxicating Beer May Cause Happiness

Groundbreaking Study Shows That Intoxicating Beer May Cause Happiness | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Science says just a tiny sip of beer can make you happy.
Jay Cross's insight:

Is this news? "Following a lengthy, one-person study we conducted in our free time over the past decade or two, we've concluded that other alcoholic drinks that can make you happy include: wine, whiskey (and whisky), vodka, gin, Qream, tequila, rum, Lime-A-Ritas, absinthe, moonshine, ether (in a pinch), brandy, ouzo, Zima, wine coolers. But note: feelings of happiness with all of the above may be empty, fleeting."

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Why A Little Bit of Stress is Good For You

Why A Little Bit of Stress is Good For You | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Long-term stress can do a lot of damage to our bodies, but recent research suggests short bouts of stress may actually boost our brainpower and immunity.
Jay Cross's insight:

There are times when I think I’d be much happier if I could spend the rest of my life lounging on the sands of the Mediterranean, having someone fan me with palm fronds while feeding me superfood grapes. In other words, life would be better without any stress. Or would it?

According to new research from the University of California, Berkeley, a little stress may not be so bad for us after all. While chronic stress may be harmful, acute (short-term) stress may actually boost our cognitive function. The findings are supported by other research suggesting a little bit o’ stress may have beneficial effects for our brains and bodies. The key, of course, is knowing when we’re too harried for our own good.

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People Happier When They Get More Sex Than Their Friends: Study

People Happier When They Get More Sex Than Their Friends: Study | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Those who got less action than their peers tended to be less happy, researchers say
Jay Cross's insight:

The findings raise the possibility that conversations with friends about sex -- plus reading all those sexual surveys in popular magazines -- create a perception about how much sex you should be having. If you have more, the study's theory goes, you are more likely to be happier. If you have less, the reverse holds true.

However, the researcher pointed out that perceptions about sex vary, and so do reactions to it. "Obviously, we're dealing with statistical averages here," said study author Tim Wadsworth, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Colorado at Boulder. "I'm sure there are lots of people who aren't having any sex, and are leading incredibly happy lives."

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4 Ways to Turn Happiness into a Competitive Advantage

4 Ways to Turn Happiness into a Competitive Advantage | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Everyone wants to be happy, but did you know that you should prioritize it as a business goal? Here are four ways that your happiness can be used to advance...
Jay Cross's insight:

A simple but valid formula for happiness.

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The Happiest People Pursue the Most Difficult Problems

The Happiest People Pursue the Most Difficult Problems | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
They're a reminder that mastery, membership, and meaning are the best motivators.
Jay Cross's insight:

Lurking behind the question of jobs — whether there are enough of them, how hard we should work at them, and what kind the future will bring — is a major problem of job engagement. Too many people are tuned out, turned off, or ready to leave. But there's one striking exception.

The happiest people I know are dedicated to dealing with the most difficult problems. Turning around inner city schools. Finding solutions to homelessness or unsafe drinking water. Supporting children with terminal illnesses. They face the seemingly worst of the world with a conviction that they can do something about it and serve others.

Ellen Goodman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist (and long-time friend), has turned grief to social purpose. She was distraught over the treatment of her dying mother. After leaving her job as a syndicated columnist, she founded The Conversation Project, a campaign to get every family to face the difficult task of talking about death and end-of-life care.

Gilberto Dimenstein, another writer-turned-activist in Brazil, spreads happiness through social entrepreneurship. When famous Brazilian pianist Joao Carlos Martins lost the use of most of his fingers and almost gave into deepest despair, Dimenstein urged him to teach music to disadvantaged young people. A few years later, Martins, now a conductor, exudes happiness. He has nurtured musical talent throughout Brazil, brought his youth orchestras to play at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center in New York, and has even regained some use of his fingers.

For many social entrepreneurs, happiness comes from the feeling they are making a differen

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Louise Thompson: Habits of happiness - Opinion - NZ Herald News

Louise Thompson: Habits of happiness - Opinion - NZ Herald News | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
This new series expands on the foundation of the 10 happiness principles we covered in the happiness audit. It's called habits of happiness and it's a natural next step from the principles
Jay Cross's insight:

"Blitz limiting beliefs."

"Develop body love."

Grow up.

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The Science of Our Optimism Bias and the Life-Cycle of Happiness

The Science of Our Optimism Bias and the Life-Cycle of Happiness | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
"To make progress, we need to be able to imagine alternative realities, and not just any old reality but a better one."

"If I expect as l
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Not Feeling the R-E-S-P-E-C-T? How to Handle It

Not Feeling the R-E-S-P-E-C-T? How to Handle It | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
We have all experienced moments in our work lives when we've felt disrespected. These situations can catch us completely off-guard — leaving us shocked and frozen in our tracks. Whether
Jay Cross's insight:

As business learns to treat people like people, Respect is required. 

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Phil Havlik's curator insight, July 17, 2013 2:46 PM

This is an interesting angle to a course I'm working on regarding respect in the workplace (fancy way of talking about harassment and bullying.) As the job market gets tighter and workplace tensions get higher, it is crucial to remember to take a "breathe" moment and consider the scope outlined in this article. Great share!

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Portrait of the modern knowledge worker

Portrait of the modern knowledge worker | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
The concept of ‘knowledge worker’ which Peter Drucker coined in 1959, is perhaps not so clear (as shown again in a recent LinkedIn discussion - access potentially limited) and can be understood at ...
Jay Cross's insight:

Brilliant. Desired traits in the modern knowledge worker:

Gifts and skills:

A synthetic mind that can ingest a lot of information and summarise it in clear and concise ways, perhaps using mnemonics.A pair of intently listening ears and eagerly observing eyes to pick up the signals around (and question them);Outstanding interpersonal communication skills helping to get in touch with a variety of people (in the same field of expertise and beyond);An open heart giving the emotional capacity to connect with others at a deeper level and build trust authentically;Good speaking and writing skills allowing to express oneself articulately so as to share knowledge more effectively – both with other people verbally and in writing;The capacity to read quickly and to remember things well;Typing blindly to write more quickly;Ideally, good facilitation skills to be able to tease out knowledge and information from other people and apply/combine them – but that is just an extra.

Attitude:

An open, curious, humble mind that keeps inquiring about everything, and does not settle for finished, definitive answers – the way a child would do rather than a self-engrossed expert – to keep on learning;A true curiosity to try new things out and add them to an array of experiences;A vision of one’s own development pathway and next priorities;Reflecting continually: every day, week or after every significant event, taking the time to ponder what just happened and what could have been done better, perhaps following the after action review principles;Reflecting in single, double and triple-loop learning, in practice;An attitude of ‘documenting on the spot’ (typing as people speak, live blogging, taking pictures and videos as things happen etc.);A strong self-discipline to systematically act upon all the above and reflect to improve again.

 

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David Bramley's curator insight, July 4, 2013 7:16 PM

A really interesting post that considers the concept of 'knowledge worker'.  In my experience, people usually relate 'knowledge' to content and the advent of search engines such as Google has devalued individual grasp of content.  However, the post focuses on gifts, skills and behaviours and how they can be used to be creative and innovative.  Well worth a read

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HAPPINESS IS A SKILL, RESEARCH FINDS

HAPPINESS IS A SKILL, RESEARCH FINDS | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
For the classic rat-race employee, the next promotion, a new house, a new car is supposed to bring contentment. Usually it doesn’t work. After a temporary jolt of joy, life returns to the less-than-satisfactory norm.
Jay Cross's insight:

But of course. Happiness can be learned. The secret is out. 

 

How long can participants in the rat-race stay in denial? 

 

Humanist Business is on the way. 

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[infographic] Industrialized vs Humanized Companies

[infographic] Industrialized vs Humanized Companies | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
How can being more open, trustworthy, and courageous through social media transform your corporation? Park Howell expands the idea of humanization vs. industrialization in this guest post.
Jay Cross's insight:

Some of this is red state-blue state, e.g. Conservative = out, Liberal = in. 

 

Others are so context-dependent, they make no sense here, e.g. Customers becoming Citizens, Excel vs. Infographics, or Modeling vs Mutation.

 

Nonetheless, a thought-provoking list. 

 

I haven't read the book, but I couldn't agree more with the title -- Humanize: How People-Centric Organizaitons Succeed in a Social World. 

 

in fact, I'm going to change the name of this curated topic to Humanist Business.That's more where my heart is at these days. 

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Taking the measure of happiness

Taking the measure of happiness | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
How are you seeking well-being? Are you a Life Twister, a Reinventionist, a Passivist, or a Traditionalist? New survey aims to determine what Americans now regard as success and fulfillment.
Jay Cross's insight:

95 percent of Americans believe the road to success involves detours and unexpected changes, and that held true across all income levels and all generations, from boomers to millennials."

 

Hence, the labels at the top of this column: Life Twisters (52 percent - they have a path mapped out but are open to veering off it); Passivists (25 percent - they don't have a specific path, but go wherever life takes them); Traditionalists (13 percent - they have a path mapped out and are determined to stick to it); and Reinventionists (11 percent - they actively seek change in their lives to reinvent themselves).

 

"With consumers more likely to expect twists and turns, it's no surprise that 65 percent of Americans report that their goals have changed many times over the course of their lives," the report says. "This represents a much less linear life path than was once traditionally expected. In fact, an overwhelming 83 percent of Americans, including 79 percent of boomers, still consider themselves to be a 'work in progress.' Just as important, the majority of Americans say they are willing to take any number of roads less traveled to achieve their goals."


Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/health/20130602_Taking_the_measure_of_happiness.html#Z4rcM1LzzJjeRZQT.99

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5 ways money can buy happiness

It all depends on how you spend it. On stuff? Or on experiences, time ... and on other people, according to authors of a new book on the topic.
Jay Cross's insight:

Well, maybe. These are ways to get more emotional payoff from your money, but I am skeptical if they have much impact on my longterm happiness. 

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Happiness Inc.

Happiness Inc. | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
How the author Sonja Lyubomirsky — a psychology professor who hates smiley faces, kittens and rainbows — has become the latest apostle of mirth.
Jay Cross's insight:

Sonja Lyubomirsky, happiness diva

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Gabrielle Bernstein: How to Achieve Unlimited Happiness by Making Changes in Your Life - Forbes

Gabrielle Bernstein: How to Achieve Unlimited Happiness by Making Changes in Your Life - Forbes | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Gabrielle Bernstein I recently spoke to the wondering Gabrielle Bernstein, who is the New York Times bestselling author of May Cause Miracles: A 40-Day Guidebook of Subtle Shifts for Radical Change and Unlimited Happiness.
Jay Cross's insight:

Forty days is not a long time.

 

In your book, you offer an action plan for people that takes 40 days. Why does it take that much time to bring out your best self? Does the amount of time required to transform your life change based on who you are?


Like any effective practice, true transformation occurs with daily repetition. Begin with a 40-day commitment and start experiencing positive results immediately. Why 40 days? Metaphysicians and yogis place much emphasis on the repetition of a 40-day practice. Mythical examples range from Moses’s 40 days and 40 nights in the desert to the story of the Buddha reaching enlightenment on the full moon in May after meditating and fasting under the Bodhi tree for 40 days. The number has scientific significance, too: research has shown that after repeating a new pattern for 40 days, you can change the neural pathways in your brain to create long-lasting change. So let’s take a cue from the mystics and scientists alike, and commit to this 40-day fear cleanse. It’s the simple, consistent shifts that count when you’re making change—so I’ve outlined May Cause Miracles to be fun and achievable. In the book I guide readers to keep it uncomplicated and stay on track. And one day at a time you’ll begin to experience the miraculous shifts.

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Your Phone vs. Your Heart

Your Phone vs. Your Heart | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
The more face-to-face time you spend, the healthier you and your children are.
Jay Cross's insight:

I LOVE THIS. 

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Video: Happiness Experts Provide Advice on Living to 100

Video: Happiness Experts Provide Advice on Living to 100 | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Toni Antonucci, Laura Carstensen and Debra Umberson talk about health habits and longevity.
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How One Company Taught Its Employees How To Be Happier, And What Happened Next

How One Company Taught Its Employees How To Be Happier, And What Happened Next | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
Hilary Kolman considers herself a happy person, but who wouldn’t like to be happier? So when she learned that her employer, media agency MEC, was going to offer a small number of employees slots in a workshop on happiness, she wanted in.
Jay Cross's insight:

Small company takes happiness seminars.

 

 

“Nearly all of us can be happier,” Sole insists. “It’s just a set of habituated behaviors really. So if we learn those behaviors, then we can be happier on just about every level.”

 

Sole covered everything in the workshop from the importance of gratitude--her students were encouraged to start gratitude journals--and finding meaning and purpose in life to the use of tools like meditation. She even led the class in a guided meditation.

 

She also shared current research from the field of happiness studies. “I had never even heard of the idea of studying happiness,” Kolman says, noting that she appreciated Sole’s intellectual approach. “I loved it because I’m on the analytics and insight team, so research is what I do, and it’s where my passion lives. I come at everything from a very analytical and intellectual approach.”

 

The subject of happiness is getting serious attention from academics these days. Harvard University actually has a course on happiness taught by Tal Ben-Shahar, also known as the “Harvard Happiness Professor.” And theHarvard Business Review devoted an entire issue to the theme of happiness earlier this year.

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Is Giving the Secret to Getting Ahead?

Is Giving the Secret to Getting Ahead? | Humanist Business | Scoop.it
The organizational psychologist Adam Grant argues that the key to hyper-efficiency is tirelessly helping others.
Jay Cross's insight:

"Traditionally the thinking has been that employers should appeal to workers’ more obvious forms of self-interest: financial incentives, yes, but also work that is inherently interesting or offers the possibility for career advancement. Grant’s research, which has generated broad interest in the study of relationships at work and will be published for the first time for a popular audience in his new book, “Give and Take,” starts with a premise that turns the thinking behind those theories on its head. The greatest untapped source of motivation, he argues, is a sense of service to others; focusing on the contribution of our work to other peoples’ lives has the potential to make us more productive than thinking about helping ourselves."

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