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Five Ways Mobile Health Technology Can Help Clinical Trials

Five Ways Mobile Health Technology Can Help Clinical Trials | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Mobile devices have become a part of our everyday lives and are significant drivers of retail and finance. The healthcare sector has lagged behind, but mobile is fast becoming part of its landscape as well. One important example is Samsung’s Remote Maintenance System which monitors equipment warnings and alerts on a real-time basis.

One area of healthcare which could benefit greatly from mobile technologies is clinical trials, where new drugs and devices are used by patients on an investigational basis to provide information on their effectiveness and safety before they are placed on the market. Mobile health technology will lead to significant reductions in the cost of conducting clinical trials, as well as potentially leading to safer outcomes for patients involved in the trials. Below are five major points to consider when designing mobile health technology or software applications for use in clinical trials.



Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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Growth of the Internet of Things | Cool Infographics

Growth of the Internet of Things | Cool Infographics | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The current projection data from Cisco is that the IoT (Internet of Things) will reach 50 Billion devices by the year 2020! Visualized by the NCTA (National Cable & Telecommunications Association) as the Growth in the Internet of Things.

Today’s Internet is driven by wired and wireless networks, keeping us connected throughout our daily lives. With the advent of new digital devices that constantly link us to the Internet, these networks have become much more than just a simple vehicle for information and communications. They now enable us to track our daily habits, monitor our health, manage home energy use and track nearly any other data we can imagine. These devices make up what we call the Internet of Things – a web of connected objects that are linked via networks that can interact with each other and with us.

The Internet isn’t merely developing, it’s exploding, and the numbers prove it. Take a look at our graphic below — it shows the advancing surge of connected devices using the Internet.

Today, there are more connected devices than there are human beings on the planet. This expansion isn’t just from cell phones, tablets and computers – it’s thanks to toothbrushes, stovetops and millions of other devices that now have IP addresses. Estimates show that there will be over 50 billion connected devices by 2020.

Fast, ubiquitous Wi-Fi and increasing home broadband speeds will drive the Internet of Things and the ever-expanding web....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 11, 6:01 PM

The Internet of things keeps on growing as this infographic shows – 50 billion devices by 2020.

Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 11, 6:04 PM

The Internet of things keeps on growing as this infographic shows – 50 billion devices by 2020.

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Usages digitaux des professionnels de santé en 2015

Usages digitaux des professionnels de santé en 2015 | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Le CESSIM a publié, en partenariat avec Ipsos, les résultats de son baromètre annuel sur les usages digitaux des professionnels de santé. Internet, mobile et autres canaux digitaux… Découvrez les principaux résultats de 2015 en infographie.

Par rapport au baromètre 2014, on observe dans cette nouvelle édition un certain nombre d’évolutions dans l’usage du digital par les professionnels de santé. Le digital continue à gagner du terrain!

 

 

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Big data project set to reveal consumer food habits & health

Big data project set to reveal consumer food habits & health | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

A 'big data' project set to extract insights into dietary habits and food behaviour will address the fragmented data linking food, nutrition and health.
The advent of innovative data collection technologies provides researchers with the tools to monitor and collect information on these behaviours.The multi-phase project aims to provide a research infrastructure that determines how food intake and food choice can lead to improved dietary patterns to address the problem of obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Like the financial and healthcare sectors, consumers and businesses within the food industry generate huge terabytes of information that offer detailed descriptions of behaviours.

The researchers believe that if these data-rich sources could be linked and analysed, they will be able to meet societal challenges regarding health, well-being and climate change

Entitled Richfields, the project is headed up by Dr Anouk Geelen, assistant professor in Nutrition and Epidemiology at Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

By combining previously under-exploited 'big data' generated by consumers (apps, sensors), as well as by business (retail and manufacturers) and research (surveillance data), the project will identify the most efficient approaches to food purchasing and procurement.

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Why We Need to Take Back the Internet from the Centralizers -  @CivicHall

Why We Need to Take Back the Internet from the Centralizers -  @CivicHall | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

In a world where digital technology reigns supreme, freedom of speech should not depend on the whims of a few powerful corporations and government rules. Increasingly, it does.

A delegation of right-wing activists will travel this week to Silicon Valley. They will be supplicants at the throne of Facebook, a platform so pervasive that it has unprecedented power to decide what’s news—a platform that could consume journalism itself in coming years. They will be begging Mark Zuckerberg for his indulgence. What they should be doing—what we all should be doing—is finding ways to reduce his company’s dominance.

The promise of the internet and personal technology was in its decentralization: one of the most profound advances for liberty in history. Yet at a rapid rate we’re seeing it re-centralized, as governments and corporations—often with users’ willing, if short-sighted, cooperation—are taking control in the center, creating choke points over what we say and how we can say it.

The Facebook situation is helping people, including journalists, see that these choke points are a threat to freedom of expression. For countless millions, Facebook is the new public square. But its terms of service override the First Amendment, as activists and others have discovered. To assemble and speak in the new public square, we need permission from its owner.

 

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"Aujourd’hui, un individu avec les bonnes applis peut aisément bypasser les organisations", estime le cofondateur des Napoléons, Mondher Abdennadher

"Aujourd’hui, un individu avec les bonnes applis peut aisément bypasser les organisations", estime le cofondateur des Napoléons, Mondher Abdennadher | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Start-up, think tank et agence événementielle, les Napoléons est et n'est pas tout cela à la fois. Comme l'explique son co-fondateur, Mondher Abdennadher, il s'agit de promouvoir une innovation ouverte et pluridisciplinaire made in France.

Pour son prochain événément prévu sur le thème de la simplicité, ils recevront à Arles des intervenants venus d'univers variés.

L’Usine Digitale : Vous avez co-fondé les Napoléons. De quoi s’agit-il ?

Mondher Abdennadher : nous avons créé une communauté regroupant tous les acteurs de l’innovation dans l’industrie des communications. Nous ne sommes pas un club de directeur de l’innovation mais un ensemble beaucoup plus ouvert. Notre communauté est ouverte aux designers, aux artistes …  et à tous ceux qui travaillent dans ce secteur des communications. Ce terme très banal aux Etats-Unis n’est pas toujours compris en France. C’est un vaste secteur, qui comprend les telcos, les médias, l’industrie des contenus, le secteur de la mobilité, les financeurs de l’innovation.. Nous considérons que nous avons une académie de 1500 personnes, mais nous sommes vraisemblablement un peu plus. Les Napoléons soutiennent une approche ouverte de l’innovation et centrée sur l’usage.

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MARKETING IN HEALTHCARE patient centricity & digital transformation #hcsmeufr

MARKETING IN HEALTHCARE patient centricity & digital transformation #hcsmeufr | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Via Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz
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Social Media And Medical Journals: The Streetlight Effect

Social Media And Medical Journals: The Streetlight Effect | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

–Another study tests the wrong approach to social media in medical publishing.

Here’s the main problem with a new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association: they measured the wrong thing with the wrong method.

In their new paper the researchers randomized new studies appearing in Circulation to receive social promotion on Twitter and Facebook or no special promotion. They excluded papers for which Circulation issued a press release. The bottom line: there was no significant difference in the primary endpoint, the number of page views at 30 days. These results were consistent with an earlier study published in Circulation in 2014 by the same authors.

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Why big data needs a unified theory of everything

Why big data needs a unified theory of everything | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

As I learned from my work in flight dynamics, to keep an airplane flying safely, you have to predict the likelihood of equipment failure. And today we do that by combining various data sets with real-world knowledge, such as the laws of physics.

Integrating these two sets of information — data and human knowledge — automatically is a relatively new idea and practice. It involves combining human knowledge with a multitude of data sets via data analytics and artificial intelligence to potentially answer critical questions (such as how to cure a specific type of cancer). As a systems scientist who has worked in areas such as robotics and distributed autonomous systems, I see how this integration has changed many industries. And I believe there is a lot more we can do.

 


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Digital health: Where we are and where we need to go

Digital health: Where we are and where we need to go | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Pioneering eHealth evangelist and founder of the annual digital health conference in Paris, Doctors 2.0 & You, Denise Silber speaks to pharmaphorum about how the digital health field has progressed and where it is heading next.

What do you think have been the biggest milestones in terms of digital health emerging as a market?

The biggest game changer has been around for nearly 20 years: it is, of course, Google, the first search engine to truly empower any internet user, whether professional or consumer, with the possibility of accessing relevant health information, people and care.

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Wikipedia Is Basically a Corporate Bureaucracy, According to a New Study

Wikipedia Is Basically a Corporate Bureaucracy, According to a New Study | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Wikipedia is a voluntary organization dedicated to the noble goal of decentralized knowledge creation. But as the community has evolved over time, it has wandered further and further from its early egalitarian ideals, according to a new paper published in the journal Future Internet. In fact, such systems usually end up looking a lot like 20th century bureaucracies.

 

Even in the brave new world of online communities, the Who had it right: “Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.”

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How Big Data Creates False Confidence - Nautilus

How Big Data Creates False Confidence - Nautilus | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

If I claimed that Americans have gotten more self-centered lately, you might just chalk me up as a curmudgeon, prone to good-ol’-days whining. But what if I said I could back that claim up by analyzing 150 billion words of text? A few decades ago, evidence on such a scale was a pipe dream. Today, though, 150 billion data points is practically passé. A feverish push for “big data” analysis has swept through biology, linguistics, finance, and every field in between.

Although no one can quite agree how to define it, the general idea is to find datasets so enormous that they can reveal patterns invisible to conventional inquiry. The data are often generated by millions of real-world user actions, such as tweets or credit-card purchases, and they can take thousands of computers to collect, store, and analyze. To many companies and researchers, though, the investment is worth it because the patterns can unlock information about anything from genetic disorders to tomorrow’s stock prices.

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The next revolutionary medical instrument? Your smartphone(Wired UK)

The next revolutionary medical instrument? Your smartphone(Wired UK) | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

This article was first published in the June 2016 issue of WIRED magazine. Be the first to read WIRED's articles in print before they're posted online, and get your hands on loads of additional content by subscribing online.

Uber, Facebook, Alibaba and Airbnb all have something in common: none of these companies owns the asset that generates its unprecedented revenue (taxis, content, inventory and property rental). This new business model is overhauling key industries throughout the economy. What is the equivalent in healthcare?

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Wearables don't lead to changes in health habits--yet

Wearables don't lead to changes in health habits--yet | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

There are a plethora of devices to track physical activity, but they're not yet useful for changing behavior, according to a group of researchers. However, they say that the rising wave of mHealth wearables could help solve that problem. 

A research team, representing universities in the United Kingdom and Australia, assessed characteristics and measurement properties of 82 self-monitoring activity devices. While a good majority track motion, very few were found to measure sedentary behavior, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

 

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3 Ways Big Data and IoT Can Improve Our Health - Electronic Health Reporter

3 Ways Big Data and IoT Can Improve Our Health - Electronic Health Reporter | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Just a few years ago, big data and the Internet of Things (IoT) were terms generally unheard of. This year they continue to revolutionize technology and the ways in which we acquire and process data, but what do they mean for the healthcare industry?

Xenon Health describe IoT as “a phenomenon through which the operational aspects of the physical world become increasingly integrated with digital platforms, enabling information to move seamlessly toward the computational resources that are able to make sense of it.” Essentially, IoT goes hand-in-hand with the mobile age and the diversity of data that is currently being retrieved from agile and mobile locations.

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Five Reasons to 'Like' Patients’ Use of Social Media

Social media also are transforming the nature of health care interactions. With greater emphasis placed on patient engagement as we move from the sick-care model to one of prevention and wellness, timely access to credible health information is essential to the health system. In addition, patients and family members who share disease and treatment experiences can play an important role in achieving better patient and population health outcomes.

As social media and their applications in health care continue to evolve, it’s worth taking a snapshot of where we are today and where we may be headed.

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Educating and Connecting Patients in a Digital World

A presentation on patients who are enabled, empowered and engaged with their health through digital technology
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umanlife's curator insight, May 23, 3:44 AM

Educating and Connecting Patients in a Digital World

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Médecine 3.0 : l’émancipation digitale du patient - Connected Doctors, la communauté des connectés

Médecine 3.0 : l’émancipation digitale du patient - Connected Doctors, la communauté des connectés | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
La santé connectée place enfin le patient au centre de la médecine de demain. Le temps de la paternalisation est bien révolu, voici enfin l’émancipation digitale du patient. Le patient 3.0 véritable acteur de santé publique, voit autour de lui de violents mouvements de chaises musicales et connectées. Les professionnels de santé, l’hôpital, les pouvoirs
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umanlife's curator insight, May 23, 3:48 AM

Médecine 3.0 : l’émancipation digitale du patient - Connected Doctors, la communauté des connectés

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From app doctors to big data: five ways tech will shape healthcare

From app doctors to big data: five ways tech will shape healthcare | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

From video conferencing your GP to tracking viral outbreaks of disease, a panel of experts shared insights into the changing face of healthcare.

App doctors

Both developed and developing world countries suffer from a lack of doctors, and the scale of the problem is so big that only technology can fix it, according to Matteo Berlucchi, chief executive of digital medical service Your.MD.

Your.MD is a mobile app that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to mimic a consultation with a GP. It answers three key questions: what is wrong with me? What is the solution? And where can I get help?

“It’s not a matter of replacing doctors but complementing them,” says Berlucchi. “Or in other words, taking some of the easier and more mundane situations off the hands of real doctors and having AI sort them out. A lot of visits to the GP (as many as three in five) are for minor ailments, advice or things that you could sort out yourself with over the counter medicines. In these situations, what the GP gives you is basically ‘the right information’.”

With some 165,000 mobile health apps available, however, there is risk that poor quality ones will cause people to lose trust in health apps as a whole. As Berlucchi says: “trust comes on foot and leaves on horseback.”

 
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Almost half of #IoT will be health-related

Almost half of #IoT will be health-related | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Healthcare technology is growing leaps and bounds and with the inclusion of Internet of things in the equation, both patients and providers will benefit from it.  In a report by Forbes, by 2020, 40% of IoT-related technology will be health-related, more than any other category, making up a $117 billion market.  Internet of things can make a huge impact on the healthcare industry by increasing efficiency, focusing on patient care and also reducing costs. Internet of things in healthcare can help create an intelligent system that can capture real time, life critical data.

How internet of things has benefited Healthcare

The potential of internet of things in healthcare is wide; there is already a huge market for fitness tracking and soon the patients will be able to take more responsibility of their health. With the use of IOT devices, there will be a focus on taking hold of preventive measures thereby disrupting current care delivery and also help shape the future of healthcare.

Below are the three most important uses of IoT in Healthcare

 

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Social Media in Oncology: Does It Help Patients?

Social Media in Oncology: Does It Help Patients? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The growth of social media in medicine, particularly oncology, has been impressive. The uses to date have varied from live reporting of meeting presentations to community development and support in any number of diseases. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2015 Annual Meeting had over 74,000 tweets in the month surrounding the actual meeting dates, leading to over 330 million impressions. An "impression" is a tweet that has been delivered to a feed. To relate it to the statistic above, tweets from the ASCO annual meeting were delivered to over 330 million feeds. The 2016 American College of Cardiology conference has had over 31,000 tweets leading to over 197 million impressions. This is just a small sampling of all the information that comes out of conferences.

Using social media for disease/treatment community development and support is also expanding. From dedicated Facebook pages to live Twitter chats, patients now interact with providers and advocates, often in real time. As I write this column, Symplur, a company that monitors and analyzes social media activity in medicine, reports 127 recurring Twitter chats in the upcoming week. Topics vary from rheumatoid arthritis, autism, and movement disorders to various malignancies, among many others.

Now that social media has a firm foothold in medicine, it becomes reasonable to ask whether it is having any impact on patient care or outcomes. This question has been raised in any number of supportive activities in medicine. There are certainly reports that online support groups benefit patients,[1] but the definition of benefit has tended to be somewhat nebulous at best. The first question to ask is, what is an appropriate thing to measure?

 
Now that social media has a firm foothold in medicine, it becomes reasonable to ask whether it is having any impact on patient care or outcomes.
 

In oncology, our usual measured outcome is survival, although quality of life is often co-reported. Quality of life, however, is rarely the primary outcome looked at in any intervention. There have been suggestions that support groups can improve survival in breast cancer, but at least one randomized trial failed to show any impact on survival in breast cancer patients.[2] Is survival the only outcome that we should measure? Can we accept improvements in quality of life as an actionable outcome? What if we show that patients who are involved in social media communities are more likely to be compliant with their care or be more open to clinical trial participation? Would that information be persuasive enough to have granting organizations, institutions, and payers be more open to providing support and recognition to the physicians and support staff involved in these activities?

Answering these questions will take a level of analysis and research that requires external support. To even get to the level of information and structure that granting organizations will be open to reviewing requires some firming up of ideas. There are physicians who are mulling these questions and starting down this path.[3] One such group in development is the Collaboration for Outcomes on Social Media in Oncology (COSMO). This group, of which I am a member, is looking at this with a blank slate, other than initially defining the best questions to ask. We have no hesitation—should the data point in this direction—saying that no positive impact can be determined by these efforts. We also have no problem saying that others may have thoughts on questions to be asked or approaches to take. In the spirit of crowdsourcing, we welcome any input. There are rumblings of an abstract to be presented at the next ASCO Annual Meeting suggesting improvement in survival with the use of patient navigators. Possibly the same could eventually be found with patient involvement in social media.

 


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Social media for medical educators 2016 

medical research, medical education, saving time with social media, librarianship
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How To Monitor Your Reputation On Social Networks - Forbes

How To Monitor Your Reputation On Social Networks - Forbes | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Good common sense is the first line of defense.

Skim any news website these days and you are likely to find a story about online privacy–and the lack of it. All of the buzz is justified: There are still very few rules in place about what people can and can’t do online.

This means that you have to be proactive and diligent about managing your online reputation and privacy in this Wild West world. In many cases people will “meet” you online before they meet you in person, so it’s important to make sure your online image accurately reflects the real you.

By far the best way to manage your online reputation is to actively post positive, professional content associated with your name, and regularly visit the sites where you are active. If you have a good reputation, people will give you the benefit of the doubt and realize that something is amiss if they receive a spam message from you or see something distasteful related to your name. As with so many things in life and on the Internet, good common sense is the first line of defense.

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Augusta University speaker urges doctors to reach out on social media

Physicians should use social media more often because patients are already on it gathering medical information, a cardiologist and social media expert said Thursday at Augusta University.

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Kevin Campbell, a cardiologist from North Carolina, told an audience at Augusta University that social media is for reaching out to patients about care in general, not specific advice.
 
 

In rural areas, social media and telemedicine could help fill crucial gaps in education and in some cases access to care, said Dr. Kevin Campbell of Wake Heart and Vascular in North Carolina and a pioneer in promoting physician use of social media.

He gave the annual Drs. Rob­ert and Lois Ellison Lec­ture­ship at the university, named in honor of the late pioneering cardiothoracic surgeon and his wife, who is now provost emeritus and medical historian in residence.

Part of Campbell’s reasoning is straightforward: Physicians should use platforms such as Facebook and Twitter because their patients are also using them.

“Our patients and our potential customers are there,” he said. “They need us there. They want us to be there. And we need to go there to provide service.”

Twitter, for instance, is a quick way to send out links to credible stories and important information to help educate patients, but it also can help shape opinion and drive traffic back to blogs or other content and to their institutions, Campbell said.

“Twitter is very powerful,” he said. “Imagine what it can do to draw patients to your institution.”

It is a great way to engage patients but “engaging directly with patients about care in general, not about their care,” Camp­bell said. “You don’t engage in a doctor-patient relationship. If you are doing a Twit­ter chat about women and heart disease and suggesting that women with these risk factors should see their internist and be screened for heart disease, that’s not a doctor-patient relationship.”

Women and heart disease is a special interest of Camp­bell’s: he wrote a book about it and has tried to help OB-GYNs develop better screening of their patients. The problem for many women is that the only doctor they are seeing is an OB-GYN, Campbell said.

“OB-GYNs are very skilled in women’s health issues; however, they’re not really trained to be primary care providers and to recognize the signs and symptoms and risks for heart disease,” he said. “I sort of made it my mission to educate OB-GYNs about simple things they can do to identify people at risk.”

His main motivation came after his daughter, Bek, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, which will likely lead to other future health complications.

“She’s going to get vascular disease, she’s going to get kidney disease, she’s going to have heart disease and I want to make sure that there is a doctor who can care for my daughter and recognizes this,” Campbell said.

Women might get the traditional signs of a heart attack that a man might suffer, for instance, but the signs could also be more vague, such as back pain or uneasiness, he said. Those would have to be interpreted in the context of other risk factors, such as smoking, diabetes or family history, Campbell said.

Social media and tools such as You­Tube videos also offer a chance to help reach and educate rural patients who could lack resources locally and have difficulty getting to urban medical centers, he said. Other technology, such as telemedicine, will help fill in some of those gaps in access to care, he said.

“I think you’re going to see an explosion of telemedicine,” he said, as direct care or in complement to infrequent clinic visits. The key to medicine now is reaching those patients where they are, Campbell said.

“Access is the key,” he said. “It’s tough, especially in big rural states like North Carolina and Georgia, to get people to the mecca” of care.


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Social Medicine: Turning to Twitter to Feel Better

Social Medicine: Turning to Twitter to Feel Better | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Make the most of social
media when dealing with health issues.

 

Social media is not just for millenials anymore. Today, the fastest growing demographic on Twitter is the 55- to 65-year-old age group. Social media allows for direct, immediate, real-time communication between individuals separated by great distances and can facilitate conversation between consumers and professionals outside of traditional interactions. 

While nearly 85 percent of the Fortune 500 companies and CEOs have a Twitter presence, physicians and the medical establishment in general have been very slow to adopt. However, things are beginning to change, as more health care providers are engaging in cyberspace and developing a significant and meaningful online presence. 

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Greater social media use tied to higher risk of eating and body image concerns

Greater social media use tied to higher risk of eating and body image concerns | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Logging on to social media sites frequently throughout the week or spending hours trolling various social feeds during the day is linked to a greater risk of young adults developing eating and body image concerns, a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine analysis discovered.

Gender, specific age, race and income did not influence the association; the study found that all demographic groups were equally affected by the link between social media and eating and body image concerns, indicating that preventative messages should target a broad population. The results are reported in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the research was funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

 

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