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ClinicalDiabetes-Social Media Made Easy: Guiding Patients to Credible Online Health Information and Engagement Resources

ClinicalDiabetes-Social Media Made Easy: Guiding Patients to Credible Online Health Information and Engagement Resources | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Within the changing dynamic of health care, health care professionals (HCPs) are no longer the sole sources of health information. Recent estimates suggest that 83% of Internet users with chronic conditions such as diabetes go online to look for health information.1 People with diabetes seek online information about the condition, treatment options, practical strategies and tools for managing diabetes in their daily lives, scientific breakthroughs, and advocacy efforts.2 

 

Yet, a Google search for “diabetes” returns 290 million results. A search for “diabetes online support” yields close to 36 million results. This can be overwhelming for anyone.



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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 4, 2013 5:53 AM

Health Information Literacy

#eHealthPromotion, #web2salute
E-Health promotion. #web2salute. Health 2.0,
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Patient-Generated Health Data: A Strategic Ingredient to Reducing Readmissions

Patient-Generated Health Data: A Strategic Ingredient to Reducing Readmissions | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

More than half a billion dollars. That’s the recently released total for readmission penaltiesthe federal government will be withholding in Medicare payments from over half the nation’s hospitals in the coming year. In this type of environment, healthcare systems are scrambling to find new solutions to address post-discharge patient needs—both to proactively improve the quality of care and to decrease the financial ramifications of negative outcomes. The good news is that with continued advances in the sophistication and adoption of technology, connected health solutions that integrates patient-generated health data (PGHD) can help address these needs and lower readmission rates. 

Driving the need for change

As a component of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program went into effect in October 2012. The provision requires the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to reduce payments to hospitals that see an excessive number of readmissions from patients with specific conditions within 30 days after discharge. Although the number of hospitals penalized this year is about the same as last year, the penalty amount is a record.

There are many concerns about these penalties, especially for hospitals that care for large populations of low-income and vulnerable patients—who often don’t have access to needed resources to follow recommended post-discharge regimens. Factors such as these and others impact a patient’s recovery and are largely beyond the hospital’s control after a patient is discharged. In addition, many patients who are readmitted suffer from one or more chronic diseases that contribute to the need to return to the hospital. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chronic diseases are responsible for seven of every 10 deaths per year, and treating them accounts for 86 percent of our nation’s total healthcare costs.

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The Impact of Wearable Motion Sensing Technologies on Physical Activity: A Systematic Review

The Impact of Wearable Motion Sensing Technologies on Physical Activity: A Systematic Review | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
STRUCTURED ABSTRACT
Background:

Participation in regular physical activity is important for improving health, but sedentary behavior is difficult to change. One option is to provide feedback on physical activity with wearable motion sensing technologies (activity devices). This review sets out to synthesize the literature on the effectiveness of these devices for physical activity, weight, and patient satisfaction outcomes, and to describe moderating factors that may impact effectiveness (ie, population characteristics, location where device is worn on body, or device role in overall intervention approach).

Methods:

We searched MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane CENTRAL from January 1, 2000, to January 6, 2015, for peer-reviewed, English-language randomized controlled trials among adults (≥18 years of age). Article inclusion, data abstraction, and quality assessment were conducted through a duplicate process, with discussion to resolve discrepancies. Trial quality was evaluated as low, unclear, or high risk of bias (ROB). Strength of evidence (SOE) was summarized as high, moderate, or low. Random-effects models were used to produce standardized mean differences (SMDs) for physical activity outcomes and mean differences (MDs) for weight outcomes. Heterogeneity was measured with I2. Qualitative synthesis was conducted for outcomes with <3 studies.

Results:

We identified 4787 unique citations; 14 trials met eligibility criteria. Women comprised 62.5% of the population. Median age was 49.7 years (range 28.7 to 79.8 years). Study sizes ranged from 20 to 544 participants (median 62), with the majority of studies (n=8) randomizing <70 participants. Although all of the interventions had multiple components, in the majority of studies (n=8), the wearable device was used in a major role (ie, central motivational enhancement). The device was an accelerometer in all 14 studies.

Twelve trials (2 at low ROB, 2 at unclear ROB, 8 at high ROB) examined accelerometer interventions for increasing physical activity; the majority (n=9) used an inactive comparator. Overall, a small significant effect was found for increasing physical activity (SMD 0.26; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.49) with high heterogeneity (I2=64.7%). Moderate SOE was found for small increases in physical activity when compared with an inactive comparator (SMD 0.29; 95% CI 0.03 to 0.55) with high heterogeneity (I2=70.3%). Low SOE and no statistically significant effect (SMD 0.17; 95% CI -1.09 to 1.43) were found when compared with an active comparator.

Eleven trials (2 at low ROB, 3 at unclear ROB, 6 at high ROB) examined the effect of accelerometer interventions on weight loss or maintenance. The overall pooled estimate showed a small significant effect for weight loss (MD -1.65 kg; 95% CI -3.03 to -0.28) with high heterogeneity (I2=81%). Moderate SOE and no significant effect were found for accelerometers versus inactive comparators (MD -1.44 kg; 95% CI -3.08 to 0.19). A positive trend with low SOE for accelerometers was found in 2 trials on weight loss, but only one was statistically significant.

No studies reported the outcome of patient satisfaction with healthcare. Also, no moderating factors were found to significantly impact effectiveness or explain heterogeneity.

Conclusions:

The small positive effects produced by interventions that include accelerometers may not result in a clinically significant impact on physical activity or weight loss; however, the small sample sizes with moderate to high heterogeneity in the current studies limit the conclusions that may be drawn. Larger, well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed. Clinicians and policymakers should consider these findings and the existing gaps in the literature before widespread use of these technologies.

 

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Can the anti-vaccine movement be convinced with more positive messages?

Can the anti-vaccine movement be convinced with more positive messages? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

In the hallway the other day a colleague stopped me and said, “Hey, do you want to see something funny?”

“Sure,” I said, and he showed me the YouTube video called “How Anti-Vaxxers Sound to Normal People.”  The video highlighted that those who choose not to vaccinate themselves or their children do so for reasons that do not make sense, and frankly seem somewhat absurd.  It is a very funny video, and I felt common ground with all aspects of it. We laughed, and then I went back to my daily work of seeing patients.

I thought about the video repeatedly over the following days, and it reminded me of a similarly powerful video I had seen recently as well,  “Penn and Teller on Vaccinations.”  This video portrays two individuals rolling balls through plastic figurines that represented people. The balls, as infectious agents, knock down (kill) the plastic figurines that represented people.  Half of the “population” is protected by a plexiglass board (vaccines), and the other half not.

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Social Media as Healthcare’s Town Square

Social Media as Healthcare’s Town Square | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

What a summer so far! At the speed of light, the world watches the Olympics as the epitome of sport while at the same time watching American politics turned on its head in a new paradigm (regardless of your political persuasions). What’s this have to do with Healthcare, Social Media, & Town Squares? Glad you asked!

It’s old news to any of us that our old (seemingly slow) modes of communication, connection, creating value, and learning have been shattered and rebuilt. The town square as an exemplar for connections is long gone. Or is it? You know better! It’s been moved but it’s still there, vibrant as ever, reflecting the flavor and tastes of each community. Things do seem to move at the speed of light, but you need to look deeper to find the places where people still stop and meet.

When you meander into 21st century healthcare town squares sprinkled across blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Medium, LinkedIn and so many more, you’re as inundated as anyone first walking into the 1559 square in Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s painting above.

 

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The Potentially Dangerous Intersection of Healthcare and Social Media

The Potentially Dangerous Intersection of Healthcare and Social Media | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Lately, there have been numerous reports in the media raising patient privacy concerns due to healthcare providers’ use of social media in the workplace.  A few examples include:

An ER nurse posting to Instagram a photo of a bloodied trauma room taken just after treating a patient who had been hit by a subway train – causing the hospital to take action against the nurse and terminate her employment;A young St. Louis obstetrician who took to Facebook to air complaints about a chronically tardy patient, who had suffered a stillbirth – which was reposted and drew hundreds of angry comments and led to a reprimand of the physician by the hospital where she worked;A Northwestern University physician posting photos of a student admitted to a Chicago hospital for extreme intoxication – leading to a $1 million lawsuit for invasion of privacy and infliction of emotional distress;A Chicago ER nurse sharing information on Twitter about a gunshot patient, including insulting tweets and a photo of the bloodied trauma room where the medical staff tried to save him – leading to a lawsuit against the nurse and the hospital for negligence and emotional distress seeking more than $100,000;Reports of abuse of elderly residents of nursing homes and senior care facilities in California, Colorado and Iowa, including the posting of nude and other humiliating photos to Facebook, Instagram and Shapchat – leading to termination, license suspension, and even criminal prosecution.

Screenshot of a bloody trauma room posted to social media
via NY Med

These and other examples demonstrate that patients, employers, regulators and even law makers and law enforcement are taking very seriously these new types of privacy concerns spawned by emerging and evolving social media platforms, and they are becoming more aggressive in pursing such cases.  Some employers and industry groups are undertaking efforts to revamp internal policies and procedures and training methods to address issues unique to the ever-changing landscape of social media technology.  There is no way to tell what the future might bring in terms of patient privacy issues and social media, but it seems likely that these challenges will continue to plague the healthcare industry.


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Social Media, Healthcare, And The Need To Be Liked

Social Media, Healthcare, And The Need To Be Liked | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

I’m a chapter ahead of how most people read the world.

If life can be funny, the Internet is hilarious. In the last several years, The Internet has created an entire culture around the need to be liked, and to show others how liked you are.

ebay is an example where telling not telling someone that you liked their product can get you hate mail. When you purchase something, you have the opportunity to let others know that the vendor was very good and that you liked their product. I do not do that. I do not give someone a like simply for doing his or her job, but I do get emails pleading for my imprimatur of approval.

Uber is another good example of our need to instantly know that we are loved. That, however, is a service where I will rate the driver, in part because I know that for the drivers to keep their job, they have to maintain a high rating. I also do it because they designed their system such that I do not get my receipt emailed to me until I complete the rating.

Social media is the same way. Facebook has given way to groups like Instagram and Snapchat so people can get liked faster. Post a picture of what you ate for desert and everyone in your network will let you know what a good choice you made by sending you a like. People who don’t send you the instant gratification that you deserve run the risk of being defriended, or even worse, abused.

Healthcare has one example of how ridiculous collecting likes has become. While Epic does not have a place on its homepage for you to show your love, it does have a place on its Facebook page. If you search for Epic on Facebook, you will find that 5,987 people like it — or them, I’m not sure which. Lemmings drinking the Kool-Aid. People allowed to decide whom our next president will be.

(I was at HIMSS this year and I did not see a single person wearing a t-shirt with the words “I love my Epic” printed on it.)

Rumor has it that the current administration is considering issuing an executive order that will require people who use Facebook to like everything their friends post about themselves in order to improve everyone’s self-image.

I do not do instant gratification. Go ahead, abuse me.

If you are a fan of the movie Bambi, you may recall that Thumper’s mother told him, “If you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say anything at all.” I think that same message applies to people and organizations that want you to tell you that you like them.  The thing is, they do not want to know that you do not like them. For example, on Epic’s Facebook page there is no thumbs-down icon for you to click, just a thumbs-up icon.

So here is why I am writing about our incessant need for gratification. A friend emailed me a link to a story about pediatrician offices in Lee County, Florida that were dropping patients because patients because the parents did not post superlative ratings. If Comcast dropped customers simply because people rated Comcast poorly, Comcast would not have any customers.

When I dislike a service I receive, I feel obligated to let someone know. If the provider of that service had the temerity to drop me as a customer, I would feel the moral imperative to let everybody know.

Physicians, especially pediatric physicians, may not understand just how involved it is to get their child to and from a doctor’s office. I posted this diagram recently that showed there are as many as 11 steps a parent must complete to take their child to the doctor.

Moms and dads are busy. And the least you can do after you have asked for their feedback is to not rub their faces in it by dropping them.

A bad experience is your problem, not theirs.


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Gartner's 2016 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Identifies Three Key Trends That Organizations Must Track to Gain Competitive Advantage

Gartner's 2016 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Identifies Three Key Trends That Organizations Must Track to Gain Competitive Advantage | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The technologies on Gartner Inc.'s Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2016 reveal three distinct technology trends that are poised to be of the highest priority for organizations facing rapidly accelerating digital business innovation.

Transparently immersive experiences, the perceptual smart machine age, and the platform revolution are the three overarching technology trends that profoundly create new experiences with unrivaled intelligence and offer platforms that allow organizations to connect with new business ecosystems.

The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies report is the longest-running annual Gartner Hype Cycle, providing a cross-industry perspective on the technologies and trends that business strategists, chief innovation officers, R&D leaders, entrepreneurs, global market developers and emerging-technology teams should consider in developing emerging-technology portfolios.

"The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies is unique among most Hype Cycles because it distills insights from more than 2,000 technologies into a succinct set of must-know emerging technologies and trends that will have the single greatest impact on an organization's strategic planning," said Mike J. Walker, research director at Gartner. "This Hype Cycle specifically focuses on the set of technologies that is showing promise in delivering a high degree of competitive advantage over the next five to 10 years."

 

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Use of Social Media in Healthcare

This is a lecture delivered to first year medical students (and their research mentors) to encourage use of social media in medical education. To enhance communication between medical students and their mentors, we shall use platforms such as facebook, twitter and slideshare.

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Doctors can now prescribe Jabra fitness headphones to treat obesity, cancer and diabetes

Doctors can now prescribe Jabra fitness headphones to treat obesity, cancer and diabetes | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Jabra has teamed up with the TrainerMD health program to help doctors monitor patients' health stats in real time using the company's new Sport Pulse Special Edition fitness earbuds.

The next time you walk into a doctor's office, you might leave with a prescription for a pair of Jabra fitness-tracking headphones.

It's part of a global partnership the audio company announced this week with TrainerMD, the first HIPAA complaint software platform that helps doctors monitor patients' fitness and nutrition in real time.

The 360˚ Health Program makes it easier for physicians, trainers and nurses to collaborate on the needs of patients suffering from obesity, cancer, and diabetes.

Participating patients are prescribed a pair of Jabra Sport Pulse wireless earbuds to incorporate into their exercise routine along with a set of fitness goals tailored to their personal regimen.

The Sport Pulse's integrated heart-rate monitor gets a reading through the ear and also calculates the patient's Vo2 Max level, calories and pace during workouts. The data will then get sent to the accompanying medical team via real-time notifications so everyone gets an ongoing status update to manage the health of the patient.

"This is game changer for patients and health care providers across the country," said Scott Lutch, MD, FACC, CMO, CSCS, NSCA, chief medical officer at TrainerMD. "Not only can patients now educate themselves, but they're also empowered to take control of their health -- and physicians, trainers and nurses are partners in all of that. With the added support of the Jabra Sport Pulse wireless earbuds, meeting individual health objectives is now as easy as listening to music or making a phone call."

 

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Twitter Social Media is an Effective Tool for Breast Cancer Patient Education and Support: Patient-Reported Outcomes by Survey

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite reported benefits, many women do not attend breast cancer support groups. Abundant online resources for support exist, but information regarding the effectiveness of participation is lacking. We report the results of a Twitter breast cancer support community participant survey.

Objective: The aim was to determine the effectiveness of social media as a tool for breast cancer patient education and decreasing anxiety.

Methods: The Breast Cancer Social Media Twitter support community (#BCSM) began in July 2011. Institutional review board approval with a waiver of informed consent was obtained for a deidentified survey that was posted for 2 weeks on Twitter and on the #BCSM blog and Facebook page.

Results: There were 206 respondents to the survey. In all, 92.7% (191/206) were female. Respondents reported increased knowledge about breast cancer in the following domains: overall knowledge (80.9%, 153/189), survivorship (85.7%, 162/189), metastatic breast cancer (79.4%, 150/189), cancer types and biology (70.9%, 134/189), clinical trials and research (66.1%, 125/189), treatment options (55.6%, 105/189), breast imaging (56.6%, 107/189), genetic testing and risk assessment (53.9%, 102/189), and radiotherapy (43.4%, 82/189). Participation led 31.2% (59/189) to seek a second opinion or bring additional information to the attention of their treatment team and 71.9% (136/189) reported plans to increase their outreach and advocacy efforts as a result of participation. Levels of reported anxiety before and after participation were analyzed: 29 of 43 (67%) patients who initially reported “high or extreme” anxiety reported “low or no” anxiety after participation (P<.001). Also, no patients initially reporting low or no anxiety before participation reported an increase to high or extreme anxiety after participation.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that breast cancer patients’ perceived knowledge increases and their anxiety decreases by participation in a Twitter social media support group.

 

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Bloomlife, une startup liégeoise lève 4 millions de dollars pour une application santé chez les femmes enceintes

Bloomlife, une startup liégeoise lève 4 millions de dollars pour une application santé chez les femmes enceintes | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Bloomlife, une startup liégeoise (Belgique) spécialisée dans le suivi à distance des femmes enceintes, des jeunes mamans et des nourrissons a réalisé une levée de 4 millions de dollars américains. 

Depuis maintenant deux ans, la startup développe un capteur validé cliniquement capable de mesurer les paramètres de santé les plus importants de la mère et de son bébé, de la conception à la naissance. Un dispositif intelligent portable de grossesse qui détecte et traque automatiquement les contractions, ainsi visibles par la femme enceinte sur son smartphone. 

Cette technologie remplit totalement la mission initiale de Bloomlife, qui est de révolutionner le secteur des soins prénataux en utilisant les données récupérées en crowdsourcing (production participative) pour mieux comprendre la grossesse et ses complications. Le potentiel de cette technologie a valu à la startup de recueillir les honneurs de l’Extreme Tech Challenge organisé àNecker Island (l’île de Sir Richard Branson) en remportant le concours. « Les juges, enchantés par notre mission, ont compris comment cette technologie pouvait venir en aide à un marché mal desservi », déclare Julien Penders, co-fondateur de Bloomlife.


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Patient Engagement Solutions Market Analysis, By Type of Delivery, By Component, By End-use, By Application, By Therapeutic AreaAnd Segment Forecasts To 2024

Patient Engagement Solutions Market Analysis, By Type of Delivery, By Component, By End-use, By Application, By Therapeutic AreaAnd Segment Forecasts To 2024 | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The global patient engagement solutions market was valued at USD 7.4 billion in 2015. The growing frequency of medical tourism coupled with the rising use of cloud-based networking models and the increasing number of investments in the healthcare IT, in the developing nations, are anticipated to propel the industry growth over the forecast period.

Favorable government legislations and awareness initiatives are anticipated to be crucial drivers for the market growth. For instance, the Readmission Reduction Program initiated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) inspire the providers to be actively involved in patient engagement solutions with the objective of containing the readmission rates while providing better inpatient services.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) further promotes the growth of this sector by introducing programs, such as the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS), at hospitals to conduct surveys thatgather information with respect to patient satisfaction associated with hospital care and services. This serves as a tool for the standardized measurement of the quality of care administered at hospitals. The increased patient participation achieved through such patient engagement efforts would impact health outcomes and subsequently enhance the healthcare delivery of the present medical systems.

 

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Usability of Commercially Available Mobile Applications for Diverse Patients

Usability of Commercially Available Mobile Applications for Diverse Patients | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Synopsis

Mobile applications, or apps, have the potential to help patients with diabetes and other chronic conditions manage their health better. But as currently designed, health apps can present challenges to the vulnerable populations who would likely benefit the most, including the poor and patients with low levels of health literacy. An observational study of adults using apps to manage their chronic conditions found that patients could complete only a minority of tasks without any assistance.

"If we cannot harness the potential of mobile technology to improve self-management and, ultimately, health, it will be a missed opportunity in efforts to ameliorate health disparities."
The Issue

The effective management of chronic conditions such as diabetes and depression often requires close monitoring of symptoms and making changes to diet, exercise, and medication. These tasks that can be made easier by mobile apps that provide patients with reminders and education about caring for their conditions. Apps also can help patients and providers track health data over time, helping to reveal how changes in behavior and medication influence outcomes. To find out whether these apps are appealing and accessible to low-income patients—who suffer disproportionately high rates of chronic disease and may be less engaged with their own care—Commonwealth Fund–supported researchers observed patients using several commercially available apps for diabetes and depression. The researchers also studied the usability of apps for elderly patients’ caregivers, who are often geographically dispersed and need to share medical information.

Key Findings
  • All the apps required significant manual data entry and progression through multiple screens and steps, making it difficult for patients and caregivers to complete basic, yet critical, tasks. In all, participants were able to complete only half of the data entry tasks—such as entering a blood glucose level—without assistance. Many were hampered by unclear explanations of what needed to be entered.
  • Patients struggled even more with retrieving data, such as information about upcoming appointments that had been entered into caregiving apps. Participants completed only 79 out of 185 tasks (43%), across 11 apps, without assistance.
  • None of the apps had simple interfaces with large buttons and easy-to-follow instructions and navigation. In general, the apps lacked explanations of the relevance of various functions—for instance, why a diabetic patient might wish to look back at a prior meal.
  • Three themes emerged from participants’ comments: lack of confidence with technology, frustration with design features and navigation, and interest in having technology support their self-management.
The Big Picture

To harness the potential of mobile apps, developers may need to engage a diverse set of patients in the design and testing of their products. In addition, the apps should be able to remind users of the rationale for each task and should integrate data from other sources, such as pharmacies, to reduce the need for manual data entry. Research on the impact of such apps on uptake, use, self-management behaviors, and health outcomes also is needed.

About the Study

The authors selected 11 popular and well-rated mobile apps from among the hundreds available to manage diabetes, depression, and caregiving and observed 26 patients using them. Nearly 60 percent of the participants were African American. The remainder were white (27%), Asian (8%), and Latino (8%). Nearly 70 percent were deemed to have limited health literacy. Each was given condition-specific data entry and data-retrieval tasks, such as entering blood glucose values into a diabetes app or recording medication instructions.

The Bottom Line

To reduce health disparities, app developers must ensure their products are tailored to the needs of the populations that are likely to benefit the most from their use.

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Tweeting to Health: A Novel mHealth Intervention Using Fitbits and Twitter to Foster Healthy Lifestyles

Tweeting to Health: A Novel mHealth Intervention Using Fitbits and Twitter to Foster Healthy Lifestyles | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
We developed and pilot tested a mHealth intervention, “Tweeting to Health,” which used Fitbits, Twitter, and gamification to facilitate support for healthy lifestyle changes in overweight/obese (OW) and healthy weight (HW) young adults. Participants tracked activity and diet using Fitbits and used Twitter for messaging for 2 months. Physical activity, dietary intake, and Tweets were tracked and participants completed surveys at enrollment, 1 month, and 2 months. Descriptive statistics were used to examine steps/day, physical activity intensity, lifestyle changes, and total Tweets. Participants were on average 19 to 20 years old and had familiarity with Twitter. OW participants had on average 11 222 daily steps versus 11 686 (HW). One-day challenges were successful in increasing steps. Participants increased fruit/vegetable intake (92%) and decreased their sugar-sweetened beverage intake (67%). Compliance with daily Fitbit wear (99% of all days OW vs 73% HW) and daily dietary logging (82% OW vs 73% HW) and satisfaction was high.
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A pattern-matched Twitter analysis of US cancer-patient sentiments

W. Christian Crannell, MD1Eric Clark, MSc; Chris Jones, PhD; Ted A. James, MD; Jesse Moore, M
 
Abstract

Twitter has been recognized as an important source of organic sentiment and opinion. This study aimed to (1) characterize the content of tweets authored by the United States cancer patients; and (2) use patient tweets to compute the average happiness of cancer patients for each cancer diagnosis.

Methods

A large sample of English tweets from March 2014 through December 2014 was obtained from Twitter. Using regular expression software pattern matching, the tweets were filtered by cancer diagnosis. For each cancer-specific tweetset, individual patients were extracted, and the content of the tweet was categorized. The patients' Twitter identification numbers were used to gather all tweets for each patient, and happiness values for patient tweets were calculated using a quantitative hedonometric analysis.

Results

The most frequently tweeted cancers were breast (n = 15,421, 11% of total cancer tweets), lung (n = 2928, 2.0%), prostate (n = 1036, 0.7%), and colorectal (n = 773, 0.5%). Patient tweets pertained to the treatment course (n = 73, 26%), diagnosis (n = 65, 23%), and then surgery and/or biopsy (n = 42, 15%). Computed happiness values for each cancer diagnosis revealed higher average happiness values for thyroid (h_avg = 6.1625), breast (h_avg = 6.1485), and lymphoma (h_avg = 6.0977) cancers and lower average happiness values for pancreatic (h_avg = 5.8766), lung (h_avg = 5.8733), and kidney (h_avg = 5.8464) cancers.

Conclusions

The study confirms that patients are expressing themselves openly on social media about their illness and that unique cancer diagnoses are correlated with varying degrees of happiness. Twitter can be employed as a tool to identify patient needs and as a means to gauge the cancer patient experience.

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Social Media & Healthcare in Ten Tweets

Presentation at the 2016 Asian Medical Students' Conference of AMSA International, 30 June 2016.
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Coca Cola y salud: el Dr. Google opina

Coca Cola y salud: el Dr. Google opina | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Después de que se haya conocido que la multinacional Coca Cola ha invertido en España más de 12 millones de euros entre 2010 y 2015 en patrocinio de congresos, jornadas y acciones encaminadas a relacionarse con la salud y la nutrición, es llamativo que en Google, el buscador de referencia mundial, no haya calado esa ‘lluvia’ de billetes que ha caído sobre sociedades científicas y organizaciones del sector sanitario.

Solo basta teclear en Google los términos Coca Cola y salud para que la primera página, tan decisiva en la reputación de una marca, se llene de enlaces con mensajes demoledoramente negativos para la multinacional de Atlanta: ‘Los efectos corrosivos de la Coca-Cola en nuestros cuerpos’, ‘Coca Cola Zero, una bebida light con efectos cancerígenos’, ‘Efectos negativos de beber Coca Cola a corto y largo plazo’ o ‘¿Se puede morir de beber Coca Cola?’.

 


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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, August 24, 10:44 AM
¿Qué ocurre cuando tecleamos en Google Coca-cola y Salud? Parece que los resultados no están demasiado contaminados por la industria, aunque tampoco es que ofrezcan páginas de calidad contrastada...
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Diabète : des applis qui renouvellent l’approche thérapeutique

Diabète : des applis qui renouvellent l’approche thérapeutique | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
A l'âge de neuf ans, la fille de Rémy Bonnasse est tombée malade d'un diabète de type 1 - un désordre immunitaire incurable, qui, ­contrairement au diabète de type 2, n'a aucun lien avec de mauvaises habitudes alimentaires. Sa vie durant, elle devra surveiller son taux de sucre, et donc calibrer chaque repas pour ne pas faire d'écart. Ayant constaté combien il était ardu de mesurer le contenu de son assiette, le consultant de Deloitte et son épouse ont décidé de quitter leurs postes confortables pour créer une application mobile d'accompagnement nutritionnel - utile pour les diabétiques, mais aussi pour tous ceux qui veulent surveiller leur poids. Ils en ont fait une start-up, DietSensor, basée aux Etats-Unis et contrôlée par leur holding en France.
En savoir plus sur http://www.lesechos.fr/economie-france/social/0211212099209-des-applis-qui-renouvellent-lapproche-therapeutique-2022488.php?YOzFutY6zoTpj5LA.99

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
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FDA declines to scrutinize claims by “low risk” mhealth apps, devices. What’s the takeaway?

FDA declines to scrutinize claims by “low risk” mhealth apps, devices. What’s the takeaway? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

FDA said it will ease up vetting general health and wellness apps, but it will scrutinize clinical applications and devices. Does this mean the FTC will step up?

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued final guidance on “low-risk” digital health apps and devices for general health management 18 months after it  came out with draft guidance.

The document offers information on the kinds of apps and devices for which it will and won’t take action. Apps promoting or maintaining a healthy weight or to assist with weight loss goals and healthy eating are OK.  The guidance says that companies can make claims that their apps and devices can help with healthy lifestyle choices to reduce the risk of chronic conditions such as Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease or improve their management. But those lifestyle choices have to be advocated by the likes of the American Heart Association or American Association of Clinical Endocrinologist or peer-reviewed medical journals.

So what are some examples of what’s not OK? Claims that a product will treat or diagnose obesity, an eating disorder, such as bullimia or anorexia, or an anxiety disorder. Digital health entrepreneurs are also encouraged to ask themselves the following questions:

Is the product invasive?
Is the product implanted?
Does the product involve an intervention or technology that may pose a risk to
the safety of users and other persons if specific regulatory controls are not applied, such as risks from lasers or radiation exposure?

If the answer is yes to any of the above, they need to assume their products are considered clinical applications, will be scrutinized and should act accordingly.

My takeaway from the guidance is twofold. It’s a question of resources. Although there are thousands of general wellness apps, more and more medical device and pharma companies are developing digital health devices and apps of their own.  Second, the Federal Trade Commission has shown it is willing to take action against companies that it deems to be making false health claims about their apps and devices.

 


Via rob halkes, Pharma Guy
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rob halkes's curator insight, August 1, 4:50 AM

Health apps should do what they promise! At the moment they need to take a diagnostic feature and use personal physics to arrive at advice or conclusions about the health status of the person who uses the app, they are considered not to be 'just' an "app" but a medical device. At that condition they need to adhere to and be certified by several criteria attached to 'medical devices". Developers should know about this, which the more professional ones will. Rightly so!

PatientView has developed a website MyHealthApps that presents an inventory of the better Health Apps.

Pharma Guy's curator insight, August 1, 8:38 AM

Also read “FDA Won't Regulate ‘Low-Risk’ mHealth Apps as Medical Devices. But Battle Looms Over Defining ‘Low Risk’"; http://sco.lt/5kkDyr

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Healthcare industry consolidation: Top health issues 2016

Healthcare industry consolidation: Top health issues 2016 | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Implications for your business:

  • Consider the unconventional. Innovative partnerships – achieved through joint ventures or loosely structured alliances – provide flexibility. M&A activity also is increasing around new entrants providing services, often outside of the traditional system, that are gaining traction with consumers. Regulatory scrutiny will only heighten as consolidation continues, and those who go to market in unconventional ways may be better positioned to address it. 
  • Capitalize on integration. Successful acquisitions hinge on well-executed integration. Investing heavily in up-front planning efforts focused on consumer value will help ensure that strong brands are not diluted through poor execution.
  • Plan around strengths. Smaller regional and niche players without well-defined strategies could quickly become targets. These systems should focus on products and service offerings considered best in class, and align with those providing complementary services to round out offerings.

 

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Instagram and Clinical Infectious Diseases

Instagram and Clinical Infectious Diseases | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

TO THE EDITOR—We read the article by Goff et al [1] with great interest regarding the relevance of social media (SM) platform Twitter to infectious diseases clinicians. We concur with the authors regarding the relevance of SM tools to infectious diseases practice and wish to call attention to the photograph-based SM platform, Instagram, as an emerging site of interest.

Instagram is a free SM platform launched in October of 2010 that has been a part of Facebook, Inc., since April 2012 [2]. The platform reports a community of 300 million users as of December 2014. Each day users from around the world (>70% are outside the US) register >2.5 billion “likes” and share >70 million photos. Data from an American survey in September 2014 indicate 26% of online adults use Instagram, and half of Internet users age 18 to 29 years of age use Instagram [3]. Beyond the large number of engaged adults (particularly young adults), it is notable that about half of all Instagram users access the site at least once daily.

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Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015

Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015 | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

24% of teens go online “almost constantly,” facilitated by the widespread availability of smartphones.

Aided by the convenience and constant access provided by mobile devices, especially smartphones, 92% of teens report going online daily — including 24% who say they go online “almost constantly,” according to a new study from Pew Research Center. More than half (56%) of teens — defined in this report as those ages 13 to 17 — go online several times a day, and 12% report once-a-day use. Just 6% of teens report going online weekly, and 2% go online less often.

Much of this frenzy of access is facilitated by mobile devices. Nearly three-quarters of teens have or have access1 to a smartphone and 30% have a basic phone, while just 12% of teens 13 to 17 say they have no cell phone of any type. African-American teens are the most likely of any group of teens to have a smartphone, with 85% having access to one, compared with 71% of both white and Hispanic teens. These phones and other mobile devices have become a primary driver of teen internet use: Fully 91% of teens go online from mobile devices at least occasionally. Among these “mobile teens,” 94% go online daily or more often. By comparison, teens who don’t access the internet via mobile devices tend to go online less frequently. Some 68% go online at least daily.

African-American and Hispanic youth report more frequent internet use than white teens. Among African-American teens, 34% report going online “almost constantly” as do 32% of Hispanic teens, while 19% of white teens go online that often.

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Social Media Use in Medical Education: A Systematic Review : Academic Medicine

Abstract

Purpose: The authors conducted a systematic review of the published literature on social media use in medical education to answer two questions: (1) How have interventions using social media tools affected outcomes of satisfaction, knowledge, attitudes, and skills for physicians and physicians-in-training? and (2) What challenges and opportunities specific to social media have educators encountered in implementing these interventions?

Method: The authors searched the MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, Embase, PsycINFO, ProQuest, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Scopus databases (from the start of each through September 12, 2011) using keywords related to social media and medical education. Two authors independently reviewed the search results to select peer-reviewed, English-language articles discussing social media use in educational interventions at any level of physician training. They assessed study quality using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument.

Results: Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria. Interventions using social media tools were associated with improved knowledge (e.g., exam scores), attitudes (e.g., empathy), and skills (e.g., reflective writing). The most commonly reported opportunities related to incorporating social media tools were promoting learner engagement (71% of studies), feedback (57%), and collaboration and professional development (both 36%). The most commonly cited challenges were technical issues (43%), variable learner participation (43%), and privacy/security concerns (29%). Studies were generally of low to moderate quality; there was only one randomized controlled trial.

Conclusions: Social media use in medical education is an emerging field of scholarship that merits further investigation. Educators face challenges in adapting new technologies, but they also have opportunities for innovation.

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The Digital Health Tech Vision 2016

The Digital Health Technology Vision 2016 reveals five trends that prove winning in the digital age hinges on people. Keeping up with changing technology is vital, but it’s just as important to evolve the consumer experience, methods of care delivery and career development opportunities for the healthcare workforce.
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Nilambari Mane's curator insight, August 22, 3:25 AM
Top 5 trends in Digital Health 
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What Is Living With An Artificial Pancreas Like? - The Medical Futurist

What Is Living With An Artificial Pancreas Like? - The Medical Futurist | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Diabetes management faces extraordinary times with sensors anddigital contact lenses but that positive future requires innovators like Dana Lewis who uses a DIY pancreas system.

Traditionally, to monitor blood sugar levels successfully, diabetes patients use insulin pumps and monitors, which send alarms if the glucose levels are too low or too high. More often than not, however, these alarms are quite inefficient. For example, they are often unable to wake up diabetes patients during the night to correct their glucose levels, risking death in their sleep.

This is exactly the reason why diabetes patients have been waiting for a long time for the so-called artificial pancreas – a closed-loop system that constantly measures blood glucose levels, that is able to administer insulin and glucagon in the right amount at the right time – so patients with this chronic illness are able to go to sleep without any worries.

There are already great examples how technology enables patients with diabetes to manage their lives easier in a sustainable way. Look at the example of Dana Lewis. She was 14 when she was diagnosed with diabetes. She, as a digital health analyist, together with her husband, Scott Leibrand, a former Twitter engineer and an expert in computer networks, decided to defy existing technology and fate and started hacking together a homemade ‘artificial pancreas’ to help Dana manage her disease.

 

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