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Bibite zuccherate, tassarle serve a limitarne il consumo e, soprattutto, ha effetti positivi sulla salute?

Bibite zuccherate, tassarle serve a limitarne il consumo e, soprattutto, ha effetti positivi sulla salute? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Bibite zuccherate, tassarle serve a limitarne il consumo e, soprattutto, ha effetti positivi sulla salute?
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#eHealthPromotion, #web2salute
E-Health promotion. #web2salute. Health 2.0
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#SocialMedia medici e pazienti, verso una nuova apomediazione

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Arianna Donti's curator insight, November 3, 2016 4:58 AM
My new article on "Il Sole 24 Ore Sanità" about the controversial relationship between Doctors, Patients and #SocialMedia.
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Adolescenti e Millennials: la sessualità e la prevenzione delle malattie sessualmente trasmissibili e dell’Hpv

Adolescenti e Millennials: la sessualità e la prevenzione delle malattie sessualmente trasmissibili e dell’Hpv | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Qual è il rapporto che la nuova generazione dei giovanissimi (dai 12 ai 17 anni) e dei Millennials più giovani (dai 18 ai 24 anni) ha con la sessualità e la prevenzione da infezioni e malattie sessualmente trasmesse?
L’indagine Censis, realizzata grazie alla sponsorizzazione non condizionante di Sanofi Pasteur MSD ed oggi distribuita da MSD Italia, ha preso in considerazione un campione rappresentativo di 1.000 giovani da 12 a 24 anni residenti nel territorio italiano, per valutarne il punto di vista, i comportamenti e l’informazione sulla sessualità e le malattie sessualmente trasmissibili, con particolare riferimento al Papilloma virus.
Il mondo in cui vivono questi giovani è inondato da immagini e contenuti sessuali sempre più facilmente accessibili, in cui internet, e soprattutto l’interconnessione continua garantita dallo smartphone, hanno potenziato enormemente le possibilità di informazione ed interazione sulla sessualità, che rappresenta il tema di gran lunga più ricercato sulla rete.
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Don’t Make these Mistakes as a Doctor on Social Media! 

Don’t Make these Mistakes as a Doctor on Social Media!  | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Everyone is looking for an edge to promote their business or service and the healthcare industry is no different. One of the most powerful tools doctors have in their bag to promote them self is social media. It is a digital resource unlike any other when it comes to allowing the ability to acquire new patients, stay connected with current patients, and build relationships that prove beneficial in a multitude of ways.

 

Social media is hardly new to anyone at this time, yet for a number of doctors, it is still something they are not especially adept at. Sure, they are well aware of what social media is, but when it comes to harnessing that power to promote them self in a meaningful way, they are lost.

 

Others are fairly well aware of how to use social platforms, but choose not to out of fear that they will make mistakes that damage their reputation and possibly, their career. Regardless of experience level or sometimes irrational fears, the importance of social media has never been greater than it is now.

 

Doctors are human, and as humans, they tend to make the same mistakes on social media that many professionals do. Whether you have been on social media for years, or you are just beginning, these are common mistakes doctors tend to make on social media.

 

Not having a strategy in place

Entering into social media with no plan is no kind of entry. It’s akin to asking to fail before you even really begin. You have to know why you are using social media, how to use it, and then you have to follow through on your strategy. Blindly posting content and hoping for the best is not a strategy. Take the time to produce or procure content that will inform and engage, then follow through with conversation as necessary.

 

Shying away from conversation

You’re on social media to engage with people so it makes no sense to ignore people when they are trying to talk to you. If you view social media as some sort of one-sided advertisement where you shout your glories through a bullhorn and nothing more, you will fail. That is not speculation, it is fact. You have to respond to comments, listen to feedback (good or bad), and show that you are available and care enough to carry on the conversations directed toward you. Anything less is not going to work.

 

Over-promoting

Remember how we said just a moment ago that social media isn’t a big one-sided advertisement? If not, we’re saying it again in a different way because it is that important for you to grasp it. Only about 20% of your posts should be aimed at promoting yourself. The remainder should be somewhat generically engaging content. It was what draws people in so that they do see the content that directly promotes you. As the song says, a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down!

 

Focusing on quantity over quality

It’s not all a numbers game. More in no way means better on social media. Focus on creating and sharing enough high quality content to keep people engaged, not piles of random postings in which you hope something catches on. Similarly, it’s not all about views, it’s about the quality of your views and if they come with engagement and shares. To just blindly post scads of content is a waste of everyone’s time and your money.

 

Not managing time and resources

Be efficient! Use tools to make your time on social media more effective. Most platforms have internal schedulers and for those that don’t, there are apps for that. This frees up more time for you to actually talk to the people commenting on your content which is what you are there for in the first place. Also, you don’t have to use every social network under the sun. Try the ones that appeal to you, but if a platform isn’t working for you or you just don’t like it, don’t waste time on it. Focus on what works!

 

Unreasonable expectations

This is self-explanatory. Don’t expect to rule the web in a week. Or month. Or ever! Go in knowing that success takes time and success is measured differently for everyone. Keep it cool and natural and don’t push! Social media is a triathlon, not a sprint.

 

Not setting up bio and profile picture correctly

You have to show people you take your presence on social media seriously if you want them to take you seriously. The first step in that is setting up your profiles correctly with banners, a real profile picture and all information fields filled in.  If you can’t be bothered to do the basics, it looks unprofessional and no one is going to take you seriously. You have to lay the groundwork!

 

Not knowing the line between personal and professional

You have to know and respect the line between personal and professional. There are many aspects of your career that cannot be discussed or even alluded to online. If you cross the line, you will pay the price. That doesn’t mean you can’t talk about anything to do with your career, you just have to stay aware of the legal and ethical boundaries.

 

Not using it at all

If you’re not using social media, that is your biggest mistake. You are missing opportunities and that is more than unfortunate, it’s almost tragic. Your possibilities online are endless, seize them before you miss the chance to benefit!


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Alejandro Buldón's curator insight, February 18, 5:33 AM
Errores de los profesionales sanitarios en las redes sociales
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Five digital health trends investors are watching in 2017

Five digital health trends investors are watching in 2017 | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Digital health technologies will transform healthcare. Mobile phones have given health care providers the ability to engage with patients 24-7 and patients are able to capture and share data that may be helpful in tracking and personalizing their health care. Genomics, analytics, artificial intelligence and deep learning technologies are all making inroads in this emerging sector. Although the amount of money invested in the sector slightly decreased from last year, according to Rock Health, venture capital interest in the digital health sector is still significant with $4.2 billion invested in 2016.
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Digital-first public health: Public Health England's digital strategy - GOV.UK

Digital-first public health: Public Health England's digital strategy - GOV.UK | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

This is a time of digital innovation. Technology is continually changing the way people live, interact, learn, play and work, offering new opportunities to change the way Public Health England (PHE) reaches out and interacts with people. Digital tools offer new ways to gather and analyse data, to engage within PHE and with our stakeholders, and to deliver better public health outcomes. This rapidly-changing world offers many opportunities but also some challenges to public health. It requires new thinking about public health delivery models, data, governance, partnership and engagement.

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5 influential ER docs on Twitter: A scientific approach 

5 influential ER docs on Twitter: A scientific approach  | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
​​​​​​​Emergency physicians are finding new ways to connect with patients, with some growing an audience by posting messages to Twitter.

Researchers at the University of Washington analyzed Twitter posts for more than 2,200 emergency physicians to see which ones made the most out of their 140-character posts. The team identified about 60 doctors who are cultivating a following on the site both by measuring followers broadly and by looking at who’s connecting the most with other emergency physicians.

The team also looked at the content of posts to determine which physicians are more likely to spread and share key information. The researchers hope that their analysis can form the basis of future study on how emergency doctors are interacting with patients and their peers on social media. For instance, many of the doctors driving the conversations on Twitter also have blogs or podcasts where they discuss healthcare topics.


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Choisir collectivement de disrupter le système de santé

Choisir collectivement de disrupter le système de santé | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

La transition numérique déplace le centre de gravité du système de santé. L’expérience utilisateur devient la mesure de l’efficacité, de l’organisation et de la pertinence.

 

Au CES de 2017, PKParis a présenté la première montre connectée pour les diabétiques. Apple tente de digitaliser le don d'organes grâce à une application. Et pourtant, malgré l'intérêt des géants, le système de santé n'a pas encore été disrupté. Malgré les discours sur les nouvelles technologies, malgré l'apparition de l'e-santé, les preuves sont flagrantes : les délais s'allongent, on ne trouve pas les bonnes informations sur internet, on remplit toujours des papiers, les médicaments ne sont toujours qu'en pharmacie...
En savoir plus sur http://www.lesechos.fr/idees-debats/cercle/cercle-165909-choisir-collectivement-de-disrupter-le-systeme-de-sante-2063180.php#xO4o3TksDpRsePIM.99


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Incorporating Social Media into the Clinical Trial Process

This presentation highlights approaches that help research teams to leverage digital approaches, in particular social media, to support their clinical studies …

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Philip Glass - Glassworks - 02 Floe

full album: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anyFjDb9oLE&list=PLTUlTwlsdlFSTvDtOJVJVrOU73W2F4LGZ Glassworks (2000 Recording) Music by Philip Glass CAST: 2 fl

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What Your Doctor Isn't Telling You on Twitter

What Your Doctor Isn't Telling You on Twitter | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Cancer doctors with Twitter accounts have something else in common: more than 70% of them receive funding from drug companies, according to a new research letter published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

In the study, researchers identified 634 hematologist-oncologists who were active on Twitter and looked up whether they received personal payments from drug companies, unrelated to research or grants, in 2014. Most of them did: 72% received payments from drug companies and 44% were paid more than a thousand dollars. Payments received by the doctors in the study ranged from $100 to more than $50,000 in a single year.

 

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Toxi Tabac, Serious Game contre le tabac

Toxi Tabac, Serious Game contre le tabac | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Retour sur le Prix UNICANCER pour le serious game santé Toxic tabac pour la prévention des risques liés au tabac chez les jeunes

Ce Serious Game a été conçu grâce à un travail auprès de 57 jeunes. Il s’insère dans un processus global de sensibilisation et de prévention des conduites addictives par une prise de conscience des risques liés à la consommation de cigarettes et des méthodes de communication des acteurs de l’industrie du tabac.

Ainsi, les objectifs de ce projet sont:

  • de permettre aux jeunes d’avoir des informations relatives au tabac scientifiquement
    validées
  • de transmettre ces informations en tenant compte du contexte communicationnel
    actuel et de la “génération digital native”
  • de proposer un outil de communication innovant dans la prévention des cancers

Le développement de ce jeu « e-santé » est le fruit d’une collaboration entre le Groupe GENIOUS, spécialisé dans les Serious Games Santé, et l’Institut du Cancer de Montpellier (ICM).


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mat_dupre 's curator insight, January 30, 12:14 PM
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Patients Opinion Leader and Pharma

Patients Opinion Leader and Pharma | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
"Me llamo Nuria y tengo lupus eritematoso sistémico diagnosticado desde los 14 años". He tardado más de 20 años en decir eso... Y no quiero que nadie pase por la soledad a que muchos pacientes nos condenamos por el hecho de tener una enfermedad difícil de comprender. Ésa es la razón por la que he decidido ayudar con mi testimonio a desestigmatizar las enfermedades autinmunes y romper mitos. A través de mi blog "Tu Lupus es mi Lupus" quiero acercar al mundo lo que es vivir con una enfermedad crónica y dar visibilidad a lo que no se ve. Mediante mi participación en diversos proyectos, charlas y ponencias reivindico la importancia del paciente en el mundo de la saludy la máxim
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Social media and patients associations: get social!

Crash course given for Lupus Europe in the Convention held in Helsinki in September 2014 to explain why it is so important that patient associations are into s…

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Social media for patients: benefits and drawbacks

Social media for patients: benefits and drawbacks | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Purpose of review

Social media is increasingly utilized by patients to educate themselves on a disease process and to find hospital, physicians, and physician networks most capable of treating their condition. However, little is known about quality of the content of the multiple online platforms patients have to communicate with other potential patients and their potential benefits and drawbacks.

Recent findings

Patients are not passive consumers of health information anymore but are playing an active role in the delivery of health services through an online environment. The control and the regulation of the sources of information are very difficult. The overall quality of the information was poor. Bad or misleading information can be detrimental for patients as well as influence their confidence on physicians and their mutual relationship.

Summary

Orthopedic surgeons and hospital networks must be aware of these online patient portals as they provide important feedback on the patient opinion and experience that can have a major impact on future patient volume, patient opinion, and perceived quality of care.


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Apps de santé : guide des mauvaises pratiques

Apps de santé : guide des mauvaises pratiques | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Alors que la France et l’Europe songent à encadrer les applications mobiles dédiées à la santé (la mHealth) je vous propose un guide des mauvaises pratiques illustré par des applis réellement proposées sur les stores.

Que ce soit chez google ou apple, ces applis sont disponibles dans les catégories « médecine » et « santé / forme », ce référentiel des mauvaises pratiques se focalise sur les apps à la frontière du médical, en excluant tout ce qui est sport/régime/relaxation …

 


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New Technologies Will Save You Time For a Healthier Life - The Medical Futurist

New Technologies Will Save You Time For a Healthier Life - The Medical Futurist | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
When people see me presenting health trackers and wearables in my use, they often ask me how I have time for measuring my health. It is true that I’m quite an avid health tracker. Previously, I have described how I track sleep and stress or how you could live healthier with the help of technology. I also shared how I created a measurement system for my health parameters with the help of a single Excel spreadsheet. I have to acknowledge it could seem so that I spend every second of my free time either measuring my health or by thinking about how to live healthier. But I have to say, I only spend maximum one hour every day with managing my health.
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How healthcare systems can become digital-health leaders | McKinsey & Company

How healthcare systems can become digital-health leaders | McKinsey & Company | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
The potential of digitization is well understood, yet healthcare systems are struggling to convert ambition into reality. Here’s what we recommend.

Health systems around the world clearly recognize the potential of digital health: over the past decade, they have invested heavily in national e-health programs. Yet most have delivered only modest returns when measured by higher care quality, greater efficiency, or better patient outcomes. And in some cases, e-health projects have been cancelled due to significant cost overruns and delays, such as the National Program for IT in the United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS).1That’s because such ambitious information-technology initiatives—with a clear focus on IT support for clinical professionals—are typically beyond the core mission of healthcare systems, which also often struggle with legacy systems that impede data integration.

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The modern doctor is a digital nomad 

The modern doctor is a digital nomad  | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

There seems to be a new tool for communication appearing on a weekly basis, be it a closed messaging app or broad social sharing tool, there is always a new medium for us to connect with the world.

Data shows that doctors, nurses and other medical professionals have flocked to tools like Twitter to share their opinions and engage with their peers on a multitude of topics, but where do they go from there? Do doctors use Snapchat? Is your pharmacist on Instagram?

Tools such as Facebook and Twitter are a decade old and have become part of the social consciousness of a generation. For many, social networks have become the primary individual communication platforms between friends, peers and groups, and these personal interactions have spread into all sectors and markets, including healthcare.

The rise Of Dr Millennial
We are seeing a positive shift in the uptake of social platforms by healthcare professionals (HCPs) due largely to a new generation of physicians, nurses and pharmacists who have qualified in the last 5-10 years.

These 'millennial' HCPs grew up with digital tools, researching not in libraries or using books, but using the Internet, collaborating and questioning their peers through social communities. Naturally their usage continued through both their medical study years and their qualified practice.

Most of the world aged 40 and under can now be found across multiple social networks both personally and professionally, and the healthcare community is no different. It would, however, be wrong to say that social activity is the reserve of the millennial HCP generation.

At the other end of the spectrum, there are highly-skilled and experienced healthcare professionals, wanting to stay relevant and adapting the way they work to incorporate social media and new technologies into their daily lives.

These individuals are pioneers who have embraced change and more often than not, use their professional credibility to lead the conversation and influence others.

The combination of these two groups has created a confluence of conversation that results in a resource of in-depth knowledge and insight provided online for all to access.

Millennial HCPs grew up using digital tools and social communities

Moving beyond 140-characters
Research shows that Twitter still holds the leading share of voice when it comes to the communication practices of healthcare professionals; however, other networks are becoming more and more prevalent.

Some, perhaps frustrated by Twitter's limited 140-character posting limit, have migrated to Medium.com, the site where users share stories, as well as interacting with each other.

Medium was created by Twitter co-founder Evan Williams in 2012, with a vision of offering the same broad accessibility of information that Twitter provided, but with much longer-form, in-depth content.

The site attracts roughly 30 million monthly visitors, and preliminary research showed a significant number of HCPs on the platform, with some writing, some engaging and others simply listening to the conversation.

The predominant content from HCPs on Medium was advice around specialist topics, usually a disease or therapy area.

These articles range from health tips, as with a post from orthopaedic surgeon Paul McDonough MD (@DrPaulMcDonoughMD) on looking after your back, to deep analysis of focused topics, such as a data-backed analysis of the single payer system in the US by Pat Salber MD (@Docweighsin), an emergency physician and founder of 'The Doctor Weighs In' blog. Pat has used Medium to spark conversation around this and many other topics on policy and governance in healthcare.

Another long-form content channel largely utilised by HCPs is Quora. The network applies a simple question and answer format to its content and hosts a wealth of knowledge, some broad, around topics such as technology, with wide interest groups, as well as other very specific conversations, such as evolutionary genetics, with few contributors, but rich depth of content.

With any channel, cutting through the noise of generalist conversation is often a challenge; Quora, however, is more approachable than others in that it breaks down conversations into topics and groups, as well as by user.

While it would be wrong to call Quora an 'emergent' site, having been set up in 2009, it is one that has recently seen a lot of activity from healthcare professionals. The number of interactions and the size of groups have grown steadily and are now at a point where it can be considered a significant outlet for HCP engagement.

The largest group to feature HCPs on Quora was 'Medicine and Healthcare'. At the time of writing, the topic had over 157,000 questions and 1.6 million individuals following the conversation. Of the top 10 writers within the topic, seven were HCPs.

A secondary topic group is 'Doctors', a group with over half-a-million followers and 18,500 questions. Of the ten most active writers, nine were HCPs.

Many physicians use Quora to test theories and ask questions of other HCPs. Sometimes these discussions are around disease areas or treatment methodologies.

In one response from radiation oncologist Marc-Emile Plourde to the question 'As a medical doctor, what is the biggest mistake that you've made?', he shares details about a mistake involving drug administration that resulted in a very negative experience for his patient. As this is in print, I cannot link to it, but I encourage you to look it up.

Plourde moved on from this mistake, which happened early in his career, to create a mobile app called MD on Call, to provide other healthcare professionals with advice on frequently encountered 'on-call' medical situations.

More often than not, social media channels and online networks can appear one-sided, with communication being very outward looking. Quora changes this dynamic. By using questions instead of statements as the starting point, conversations flow more naturally.

Many physicians use Quora to test theories and ask questions of other HCPs

Smile, you're on camera!
While channels like Twitter, Quora and Medium extend the reach of traditional knowledge sharing by healthcare professionals, there are a number of truly innovative implementations of new social channels by healthcare professionals.

One that has caused a furore, both in the healthcare world and with the wider public, is that of surgeons taking their surgery global through video and photo live sharing networks like Facebook live, Instagram and Snapchat.

These social trailblazers, generally from the field of cosmetic surgery, have opened up their theatres to tens of thousands of people, all of whom chose to watch plastic surgeons in action.

Dr Sandra Lee, otherwise known as 'Dr Pimple Popper,' performs blackhead extractions and more to an audience of about 1.6 million on Instagram.

The California based, board-certified dermatologist has performed thousands of procedures, all documented through Instagram. From an analysis of the comments, many seem to find her work fascinating, while others use the innovative interactive approach to ask questions, relating either to a personal condition or advice regarding the profession of cosmetic surgeon.

Other examples of 'live' surgery include plastic surgeon, Matthew Schulman MD, who uses Snapchat to share images and video of a variety of plastic surgery procedures, including those performed under general anaesthesia such as liposuction and hernia repair.

While these videos garner huge media attention, and views in the millions, not everyone is pleased with this latest development. Many physicians claim that the videos distract from the procedure and can potentially pose a threat to the patient.

In 2013 the General Medical Council introduced a set of guidelines on how HCPs should conduct themselves on social media. However, with constantly evolving social and technological changes, a further revision will soon be needed to keep up with the pace of innovation.

The way we interact has changed beyond recognition over the past decade and will continue to do so over the decade to follow. For those in healthcare, social media and technology provide new and innovative opportunities to educate, engage and learn. The challenges for healthcare professionals will be to find the balance between what is possible and what is best for the patient.


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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NHS to start prescribing health apps that help manage conditions

NHS to start prescribing health apps that help manage conditions | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
The future of healthcare could be in your pocket. Two new medical apps that help people monitor their health at home, reducing their need to visit a doctor, are set to be rolled out to as many as four UK National Health Service trusts over the next year.The apps, which are currently being trialled in four hospitals in Oxfordshire, UK, transmit patient data from a tablet or smartphone directly to clinicians. According to Ilan Lieberman, a member of the Royal Society of Medicine’s council on telemedicine and ehealth, such apps will have a huge impact on the management of chronic diseases.One system, called GDm-health, helps manage the treatment of gestational diabetes – a condition that affects about 1 in 10 pregnant women. The smartphone app lets women send each blood glucose reading they take at home to their diabetes clinician.
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How do young adults engage with online health information?

How do young adults engage with online health information? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Social media, from blogs and wikis to sites such as Facebook or Twitter, are now common features of everyday life for many people. They provide the opportunity to share experiences of illness and to learn from the shared experiences of others, and previous research has shown this is particularly the case for people managing long-term health conditions.

The authors of this recent study (Fergie et al, 2016) wanted to explore not only how young adults with chronic conditions engage with health information they find online, but also how they contributed as ‘producers’ of that online information.

 


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You can grow new brain cells. Here's how

You can grow new brain cells. Here's how | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Can we, as adults, grow new neurons? Neuroscientist Sandrine Thuret says that we can, and she offers research and practical advice on how we can help our brains better perform neurogenesis—improving mood, increasing memory formation and preventing the decline associated with aging along the way.
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Rethinking the role and impact of health information technology: informatics as an interventional discipline

Rethinking the role and impact of health information technology: informatics as an interventional discipline | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Abstract

Recent advances in the adoption and use of health information technology (HIT) have had a dramatic impact on the practice of medicine. In many environments, this has led to the ability to achieve new efficiencies and levels of safety. In others, the impact has been less positive, and is associated with both: 1) workflow and user experience dissatisfaction; and 2) perceptions of missed opportunities relative to the use of computational tools to enable data-driven and precise clinical decision making. Simultaneously, the “pipeline” through which new diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents are being developed and brought to the point-of-care or population health is challenged in terms of both cost and timeliness. Given the confluence of these trends, it can be argued that now is the time to consider new ways in which HIT can be used to deliver health and wellness interventions comparable to traditional approaches (e.g., drugs, devices, diagnostics, and behavioral modifications). Doing so could serve to fulfill the promise of what has been recently promoted as “precision medicine” in a rapid and cost-effective manner. However, it will also require the health and life sciences community to embrace new modes of using HIT, wherein the use of technology becomes a primary intervention as opposed to enabler of more conventional approaches, a model that we refer to in this commentary as “interventional informatics”. Such a paradigm requires attention to critical issues, including: 1) the nature of the relationships between HIT vendors and healthcare innovators; 2) the formation and function of multidisciplinary teams consisting of technologists, informaticians, and clinical or scientific subject matter experts; and 3) the optimal design and execution of clinical studies that focus on HIT as the intervention of interest. Ultimately, the goal of an “interventional informatics” approach can and should be to substantially improve human health and wellness through the use of data-driven interventions at the point of care of broader population levels. Achieving a vision of “interventional informatics” will requires us to re-think how we study HIT tools in order to generate the necessary evidence-base that can support and justify their use as a primary means of improving the human condition.

 

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10 years of doctors’ social networks: What have we learnt? What can we expect?

10 years of doctors’ social networks: What have we learnt? What can we expect? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

This year marks the 10th anniversary of a truly historical event in social media and medicine. In February 2007 the world’s first doctors-only social network was launched in the USA under the name of Sermo, the Latin word for conversation.

Before 2007 there were of course medical portals and aggregators, but no communities in which doctors could meet, talk and exchange opinion in a closed trusted environment. Sermo changed all that.

The rest, as they say, is history, yet what a history it is. Today there are by my estimate over 140 networks worldwide with at least 7.5 million healthcare professional members, of which some 5.5 million are doctors. To put this into perspective, Facebook cited that as of the end of 2016 approximately 24% of the world’s population had an active account. Now compare that with the 5.5 million doctors, from a global total of 10 – 15 million (World Health Organization estimate), using professional social networks. Depending on the number you care to select, that results in 36% to 55% using; eat your heart out Facebook!

Key lessons

I believe we have learnt at least six crucial lessons over the past decade.

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Twitter and Cardiovascular Disease
Useful Chirps or Noisy Chatter?

Twitter and Cardiovascular Disease<br/>Useful Chirps or Noisy Chatter? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

As modern society continues to organize around a digital, connected way of life, information from our daily interactions and exposures are now measured, recorded, and memorialized in ways previously unimaginable. This tapestry of information includes data from social media or electronic tools, such as websites and applications, that enable users to create, share, and exchange content.1 Twitter is one such social networking service whose 310 million active users post short public messages known as Tweets.

In this issue of JAMA Cardiology, Sinnenberg and colleagues2 explore the characteristics of Twitter users and Tweets associated with cardiovascular disease. They found a large volume of Tweets (4.9 million) on cardiovascular disease and were able to characterize tone, style, and perspective of these Tweets, as well as some basic demographics of the users posting them. Most notably, Sinnenberg and colleagues found that Tweet volume and content were temporally associated with news events that were thematically connected with cardiovascular disease.

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Can Social Media Save Lives? | Life Goals Mag

Can Social Media Save Lives? | Life Goals Mag | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Many people think of social media as a place to waste time. Users log on to check out a friend’s vacation photos, let the world know about their relationship status and catch up on some news. And hopefully not the fake kind. But can social media be used for a greater good?

Could it save lives? The short answer is “yes.”

From providing emotional support to suffering patients to training of first responders to education and encouraging wellness, social media provides health benefits galore. So while Facebook can’t drive you to the hospital yet, there are many signs of hope within social media channels.

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30 Facts & Statistics On Social Media And Healthcare

30 Facts & Statistics On Social Media And Healthcare | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Constantly evolving social technology and user centric trends make for the perfect digital strategy storm! What platforms are better suited to adapting to drastic changes than those that focus on individualized care?  In this article, we highlight the most relevant statistics of social media and healthcare.

  1.  42% of individuals viewing health information on social media look at health-related consumer reviews. (Source PWC)

Takeaway:  Audiences are seeking collective knowledge when it comes to their health related decision making.  Having multiple voices who can relate to a similar situation, or who have experienced similar circumstances, will always garner greater persuasion than that of a single brand.

  2.  32% of US users post about their friends and family’s health experiences on social      media. (Source PWC)

Takeaway: Social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Google, or even SnapChat have become the modern day blog forums for folks to vent about their loved ones healthcare stories and/or struggles.  For healthcare brands and startups, there’s huge potential in connecting with these caregivers and patients.

   
 

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