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A Critical Use of Social Media in Medicine is for Learning

A Critical Use of Social Media in Medicine is for Learning | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The evidence base supporting medical practice is growing at an exponential rate, and the time when any one physician could stay abreast of this evidence base has long since passed. Physicians in the primary care field and physicians in data-intensive and rapidly changing specialties such as oncology bear a particularly heavy burden in trying to manage this avalanche of information. Moreover, it is expected that newer forms of medically relevant information (comparative effectiveness research, patient-reported outcomes, personalized genomic and proteomic analyses, etc.) will need to be seamlessly integrated into medical practice.

 

As a result, within the next five years, the evolution of medicine will face an alarming bottleneck when the systems to support the publication, dissemination, uptake, and integration of new information will likely fail. (Perhaps not the best way to start a post on being ‘social’)

 

Social Learning in Medicine

Social learning theory has long been explored in the professions of medicine and education. In the past these explorations focused on simple connection derived from training pedigree, geography, and shared memberships in medical societies or associations. But with the emergence of social media the concepts of social learning can encompass a myriad of nontraditional connections and uses.

 

It is my hypothesis that docs may use social media in three separate ‘meaningful’ ways:

1. As a means of medical practice—providing direct patient care
2. As a public health communication channel—providing a credible opinion and review of breaking medical news and reports for the public
3. As a means of supporting their own continuing professional development—providing a learning and decision-making resource based on the collective knowledge of their own network

 

 

In the beginning of 2011 I, along with collaborators from Baylor (@doctor_v), Johns Hopkins (@rsm2800), and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (@mwasko), set out to better understand this third definition of the meaningful use of social media—how docs are using social media to share medical information and support their own continuing professional development.

 

Stay Tuned for Our Initial Peer-Reviewed Data Set

In research presented at the Medicine 2.0 meeting last fall at Stanford University, we reported for the first time on the meaningful adoption of social media as a professional learning resource, but we barely scratched the surface of the stories our data has to tell…and now it looks like our fuller dataset will be finally published in JMIR within the next month!!!

 

In the weeks that follow the publication of this research I will be taking special effort to explore and share the dataset in its fullest and I would love this community to join me. There are countless additional questions to be asked – some may be answerable with the existing dataset, others may take additional research – and we would be foolish to believe that this community can’t help us craft better and more insightful research questions.

 

Please keep an eye out for this research and please do not hesitate to contact me if you think there are other questions you are ready to explore.

 


Via Parag Vora, Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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Social media e promozione della salute

Social media e promozione della salute | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Scoop.it … nuovi strumenti per guadagnare salute. Un manuale operativo per cittadini, medici, infermieri, amministratori.


#HealthPromotion

La rivoluzione digitale porta con sé novità e trasformazioni che cambiano anche la “galassia salute”. In questo campo il progresso tecnologico ci porta a riflettere sull’impatto che l’evoluzione digitale avrà sui determinanti sociali della salute (Weiner 2012). Le nuove piattaforme stanno trasformando il modo in cui i cittadini e gli operatori sanitari interagiscono quotidianamente; usate in modo corretto rappresentano una nuova opportunità per costruire comunità sostenibili e riorientare i nostri comportamenti.

“Salute” e “Promozione della salute” sono in costante evoluzione e i progressi sono quotidiani; internet, app, mobile e gli strumenti del web 2.0 consentono una diffusione tanto rapida quanto capillare di queste conquiste. Per medici e professionisti si è perciò, aperta una grande opportunità di incontro, di condivisione di informazioni e dati, di vicinanza al territorio che li porta a studiare e utilizzare tali tecnologie. 
Grazie al web 2.0 i pazienti rivendicano un ruolo attivo nelle decisioni “Citizen included” (Lucien Engelen 2013, e-Patient Dave deBronkart 2014).

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Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Alcohol & other drug issues in the media
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Public Health Association backs medicinal cannabis (ACT)

Public Health Association backs medicinal cannabis (ACT) | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Doctors should manage a tightly regulated, compassionate regime for the use of medicinal cannabis in Australia, a leading public health organisation has told an ACT inquiry. 

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Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Media and Healthcare
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Social Media and Inherent Risks in the Pharmaceutical Industry

Social Media and Inherent Risks in the Pharmaceutical Industry | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

What we understand today as “social media” has been with us for about a decade now. And the use of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn, to name but a few, has been embraced by enterprises for various business purposes from the very beginning. Besides research and development, human resources, and sales, one of its major areas of application is marketing. Big companies from many sectors benefit from building strong customer relations and, thus, brand recognition by means of social media.

Present Use of Social Media and its Risks

While many industries like consumer goods or banking have been making extensive use of social media for some years now, the pharmaceuticals sector lags behind for the most part. Thus, forgoing a powerful tool to boost their businesses. With the rapid spread of mobile internet devices such as smartphones and tablet computers the importance of social media applications as a major source of information for consumers is bound to grow.

By now, hundreds of millions of people and businesses around the world have connected via social media applications and built huge networks at low cost. They generate, share, and consume content that is spread in the twinkling of an eye. Such social dynamics can gain huge momentum and are hard to control. Once a piece of content goes viral, one better hopes it rebounds to one’s advantage. Particularly, since the internet doesn’t forget.

This inherent reputational risk is not the only risk in social media engagement enterprises need to take into account when developing a successful social media strategy. Those risks are manifold and can be divided into risks of a corporate social media presence itself and risks induced by the use of social media by employees.

Among the former, there is the risk of data leakage and identity theft by means of viruses and malware introduced into the corporate network. Likewise, customers or the enterprise can get publicly exposed through a hijacked or fraudulent organizational presence. This may result in adverse legal actions, customer backlashes, phishing attacks on the concerned parties and reputational damage. Poorly defined content rights to posted information pose the risks of the company’s loss of control and legal rights of the posted information. Moreover, a move to a digital business model can increase customer service expectations possibly leading to customer dissatisfaction with the responsiveness in the introduced social media channels. Fines and regulatory sanctions as well as adverse legal actions are risks posed by mismanagement of digital communications, which can be effected by retention regulations or electronic discovery.

In addition to those risks of a corporate social media presence, there are a number of risks posed by the use of social media by employees, which need to be taken into account when building up an integrated social media risk management. Among those are the risks of privacy violations, damage to corporate reputation, and the loss of competitive advantage, in case personal accounts are used to post work-related information. Employees who publish content, which relates them to the company, can pose one more potential source of damage to the brand or corporate reputation. Likewise, the risks of network utilization issues, productivity losses and increased exposure to viruses and malware can arise through the excessive use of social media applications in the workplace. And furthermore, the access of employees to social media with company-supplied mobile devices can pose the risk of infections, data theft and leakage, and the circumvention of company controls.

Those are a lot of risks, one may argue. But there is one more significant risk that every enterprise faces, which tinkers with the idea of missing out on taking advantage of this powerful instrument, and that is the risk of opportunity costs. The question is not whether or not to engage in social media. The question is which tools from this versatile set of social media applications best support the business purposes, and how it can be managed in a manner that guarantees that potential risks are being outweighed by material benefits.

Social Media in the Pharmaceutical Industry

For several years enterprises from various sectors have gained experience in this area. In collaboration with research institutions, associations, and consulting agencies, they have developed specific safeguards. Such measures include corporate strategies, frameworks, policies, as well as awareness trainings communications for employees, vendors, and customers, which address and mitigate potential risks. And, thus, empower enterprises to profit from engaging in social media.

The relative reluctance of the pharmaceuticals industry may have prevented it from some teething troubles or other in the past. But it definitely prevents enterprises in the sector from taking huge opportunities.

Of course, the pharmaceuticals industry is different from other sectors. Safety and quality management, risk management, marketing, and other areas of operations play a more crucial role than in other sectors. And the enterprises are object to strict laws and regulations and close monitoring. Some of this relative reluctance in the application of social media is certainly due to the legal and regulatory environment. In this field of regulatory compliance in the US, for instance, further clarification on the use of social media in the sector may facilitate a catching up. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) made a move in addressing this by its January 2014 publication of a Draft “Guidance for Industry Fulfilling Regulatory Requirements for Postmarketing Submissions of Interactive Promotional Media for Prescription Human and Animal Drugs and Biologics” (for comment purposes only).

This draft FDA guidance is “intended to describe FDA’s current thinking about how manufacturers, packers, and distributors (firms), that may either be the applicant or acting on behalf of the applicant, of prescription human and animal drug and biological products (drugs) can fulfill regulatory requirements for postmarketing submissions of interactive promotional media for their FDA-approved products.

While such initiatives towards further clarification in the area of regulatory compliance are welcome and may be helpful, not all enterprises have waited to engage social media applications for their business purposes. A couple of enterprises are pioneering. Among them is big fish – realizing the huge potential of this dynamic set of tools.

Conclusion

To allow for such engagement to fully and sustainably strengthen the company’s competitive position and satisfy stakeholder interests it is crucial to adequately address and prioritize inherent risks, develop an integrated social media strategy, and implement effective and efficient safeguards.



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What We Know & Should Anticipate About FDA Regulation of Pharmaceutical #Mobile Apps

What We Know & Should Anticipate About FDA Regulation of Pharmaceutical #Mobile Apps | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Over the last couple years, FDA has clarified the scope of its regulation over mobile health. In the agency’s September 2013 guidance, FDA spelled out its oversight for some of the most common mobile medical apps. Then, last month, in two separate draft guidances FDA explained the limits on its oversight of apps used for general wellness like fitness trackers, as well as apps that may be accessories to a medical device. And already in February, FDA published a final guidance deregulatingmedical device data systems, a category that includes numerous mobile apps. The agency has been busy.


But one area FDA has yet to clarify is apps that guide the appropriate use of drugs. Many of those apps potentially fit the category of clinical decision support (CDS) software, an area that FDA has been planning guidance since 2011, but so far has not addressed.


To be fair, this is undoubtedly one of the most difficult guidances to write. Frankly, the number of use cases for CDS is mind-boggling. Compounding matters, creative people are coming up with new use cases on almost a daily basis. For policymakers this is both exciting and challenging.


To help pharmaceutical companies during this period while FDA drafts its proposed guidance, I’d like to summarize what we already know from previous FDA communications, and also offer some thoughts on what the upcoming guidance should address. 


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, February 28, 7:45 AM


FDA's "Decision Algorithm for General Wellness Products" is pretty incomprehensible! See here.


Meanwhile, I invite you to listen to my interview of Bradley Merrill Thompson in this podcast: Beyond Mobile Medical App Guidance - What to Worry About After FDA Publishes Its "Final" Guidelines

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Twitter can help doctors treat patients better

Twitter can help doctors treat patients better | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Using Twitter can help physicians be better prepared to answer questions from their patients, according to new research.
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Social Media for Healthcare: Why Should I Use LinkedIn?

Social Media for Healthcare: Why Should I Use LinkedIn? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Here’s an important statistic in social media for healthcare: Based on the Pew Research Center’s most recent social media update, LinkedIn has seen significant increases over the past year in user engagement and its number of adult users. The share of users with college educations on LinkedIn reached 50%, and its chief audience — professionals and college graduates — has continued to grow.

What does this mean for your marketing strategy? Long story short: If you and your medical practice are not already on LinkedIn, now is the time to get started. Here, we’ll list the ways you can use the website to your marketing plan’s advantage.

Build your profiles — and fill everything out. 

Think of it this way: Part of the reason why social media for healthcare is so important is its ability to pop up on search results when prospective patients search for your practice’s name. You want your audience to be able to find the most relevant information about your practice, including the essentials — like contact information and services — and the factors that leave people with a positive first impression.

If your patients see a professional and thoughtfully complete LinkedIn company page for your medical practice, it will give them a better idea of your brand. And, not only that, but what happens if they search for a specific medical professional within your office? Will they find nothing, or will they find a wealth of information packed with a professional photo of their prospective doctor, credentials, and educational background? It’s easy to see which result will be more beneficial for you — so, set aside an hour to create a social media for healthcare profile on LinkedIn that accurately captures your office’s appeal.

Start with relevant contact information, but also create a company mission statement, and upload a cover photo and profile picture that echo your brand’s image. The Mayo Clinic and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are prime examples of branding done right.

Get involved with professionals, clients, and social media.

LinkedIn allows you to join up to 50 groups, which not only gives you an opportunity to engage with other professionals, but also provides additional forums to engage with other users. Share content with your networks, not only within your groups but also to your profile; cross-post blogs articles that appeal to your peers, and begin conversations with users to build your credibility.

This amount of social media for healthcare activity translates into a few different levels of positive feedback. Not only will it potentially increase the amount of clicks you receive to your homepage (which can translate into the ever-wonderful increases in organic search rankings we all want to see), but it can also turn into two of LinkedIn’s best features: testimonials and recommendations.

Testimonials and recommendations allow other professionals (or even clients, if they’re also on LinkedIn) to leave reviews on your individual profile page for everyone else to see. These steps can translate into a serious amount of credibility, which can motivate prospective patients to take their first few steps through your practice’s doors — and if that’s not a huge ROI, we’re not sure what is. Invest some time, build your relationships, and give users a chance to see what you and your practice are doing to share and build your practice online — it’s a smart move in social media for healthcare, and a smart move for your marketing plan overall.



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Post FDA announcement on gay man being able to donate blood - YouTube

http://youtu.be/bYXxMO_mTBY

Via uri goren
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Patient commentary: social media provides patient with support, information, and friendship

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"How We Consume Media" Tom Fishburne

"How We Consume Media"  Tom Fishburne | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Our media habits have changed irrevocably. But much of today's marketing is still biased toward how we consumed media in the past.
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Social Media's Effect on Learned Intermediary Doctrine

Social Media's Effect on Learned Intermediary Doctrine | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Google your favorite drug or medical device company and the words "social media" and you will likely find—to no surprise—that industry is embracing this multifaceted communications method. Blogs, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, Instagram, LinkedIn and of course Twitter are all devices used by industry to communicate with investors, consumers, journalists and the community at large. Industry use of this media is widespread and likely to increase.


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Addiction aux smartphones : on vous dit tout !

Addiction aux smartphones : on vous dit tout ! | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

L'addiction aux smartphones, ce n'est pas nouveau, mais elle prend de plus en plus d'ampleur. Impact psychologique, relationnel, social, on vous dit tout


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Goodbye Dr. Google, hello Medivizor

Goodbye Dr. Google, hello Medivizor | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Israeli-American medical health startup personalizes health information and keeps patients up to date with the latest medical news.

Via Medical Web Services, Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
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Bloguer sa maladie et soins palliatifs : nouveaux enjeux cliniques?

Bloguer sa maladie et soins palliatifs : nouveaux enjeux cliniques? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Sono gli operatori sanitari preparati ad affrontare nuove problematiche cliniche ed etiche sollevate dall'utilizzo dei social media da parte dei pazienti? E 'questo pensiero che invita un caso di studio pubblicato in Medicina Palliativa, Il paesaggio del blogging in cure palliative , che ha esaminato il fenomeno dal punto di vista di un team di assistenza sanitaria.

Ammesso di un'unità speciale di cure palliative, un paziente con un cancro al cervello aggressivo ha messo in luce le insidie di pubblicazione di un blog in un contesto di malattia terminale, ma anche gli aspetti positivi ei benefici che potrebbero attirare i professionisti di questa nuova pratica.

Il paziente aveva integrato l'uso di un iPad nella cura naturalmente, in parte a causa della diminuzione delle sue capacità di interazione. Quindi, utilizzando la funzione di blocco note, avrebbe potuto comunicare con il personale infermieristico. Cura Rapidamente team ha scoperto che il paziente è stato utilizzato anche per modificare un blog quotidiano documentando la sua salute, le immagini diagnostiche di procedure mediche che erano state l'oggetto, attraverso un resoconto dettagliato di interazioni con caregivers. Anche se il blog non conosceva un grande pubblico, tuttavia, si unì ad altri pazienti con diagnosi simili, che partagaient messaggi di sostegno con il blogger paziente, ma anche il contenuto delle discussioni con i loro medici. Per gli operatori sanitari, la condivisione di tali informazioni intime può porre nuove questioni etiche legate alla riservatezza del rapporto medico-paziente.

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Comment la Santé s'invite sur les médias sociaux

Comment la Santé s'invite sur les médias sociaux | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Le développement du secteur médical sur Internet et les réseaux sociaux est porteur d'espoir pour les patients comme pour les professionnels. Il reste cependant ralenti par la trop grande diversité des outils, la difficulté pratique pour les déployer à grande échelle, et la complexité des modèles économiques.

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Social Media & Medical Malpractice

Social Media & Medical Malpractice | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Social Media has taken the nation by storm, and depending on the source has had both negative and positive impacts. In today’s world, where it is popular and even encouraged to post or “share” more and more of our lives with the world, we often forget that there can be consequences. Such instances have been highlighted in recent news stories where criminals post about their crimes or where a “simple”tweet can jeopardize one’s job. Relevant to our line of work, the same instances are beginning to pop-up in the medical malpractice world and are impacting both the plaintiffs’ and defendants’ cases.

Similar to past publicized instances where worker’s claiming workplace related injuries (workman’s compensation cases) were then caught on tape working without hindrance or evidence of said injury, some people pursuing a medical malpractice claim, are now literally handing over evidence when they publicly share content on social media that blatantly negates their medical malpractice claim.

Information that is made public (shared publicly) via Facebook or Twitter for example is most often “fair game” in today’s world, and many lawyers are turning to social media outlets to look for evidence of fraud or question the credibility of a claim or party in the case. Social media in this instance, has turned into a valuable tool for the attorney, but on the flip side, a seemingly innocent post can also have the opposite effect. This has led to many attorneys counseling their clients to be careful about what they post or refrain from social media altogether while a case is pending.



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New Pharma Digital Marketing Benchmarks Show that Online Pharmaceutical Marketing Continues to Drive Brand Awareness, Favorability and Conversions

New Pharma Digital Marketing Benchmarks Show that Online Pharmaceutical Marketing Continues to Drive Brand Awareness, Favorability and Conversions | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
comScore, Inc. (NASDAQ: SCOR), a leader in measuring the digital world, today released results from its eighth annual Online Marketing Effectiveness Benchmarks for the Pharmaceutical Industry, conducted in partnership with marketing innovation consultancy Evolution Road LLC.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
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HIV drug Truvada reduces risk of infection by 86% 'and should be rolled out on NHS'

HIV drug Truvada reduces risk of infection by 86% 'and should be rolled out on NHS' | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Daily HIV pill prevents transmission among gay men, study finds.
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Hashtags and Health Literacy: How Social Media Transforms Engagement

Clinicians have situated themselves in the perfect position to capture their patients’ attention. In 2012, the world renowned Mayo Clinic Health System provided care for just over one million people. As of February 2015, the Mayo Clinic had over one million followers on Twitter, greater than 550,000 likes on Facebook and more than 23,000 subscribed on YouTube. Physicians and their respective organizations are moving in droves to reach their patients through phone, computer, tweeting, texting and posting.

Now that the healthcare world’s social media presence has been established, there is potential to do more than advance a health system’s brand. There is an untapped power in social media: the power to make patients healthier by targeting health literacy.

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Development of a Twitter-Based Intervention for Smoking Cessation that Encourages High-Quality Social Media Interactions via Automessages

Development of a Twitter-Based Intervention for Smoking Cessation that Encourages High-Quality Social Media Interactions via Automessages | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Conclusions: A hybrid social media intervention that combines traditional online social support with daily automessages appears to hold promise for smoking cessation. This hybrid approach capitalizes on social media’s spontaneous real-time peer-to-peer exchanges but supplements this with daily automessages that group members respond to, bolstering and sustaining the social network and directing the information content. Highly engaging, this approach should be studied further.

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Patient commentary: social media provides patients with support, information, and friendship

AnalysisSpotlight: Patient Centred CarePatient commentary: social media provides patients with support, information, and friendshipWhen I was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus 32 years ago, aged 15, social media did not exist. After months of diagnostic tests, I was happy to find out that my condition had a name. Six months after diagnosis, I attended my first lupus support group, where the topic for discussion was funeral planning. Questions posed included “what prayers and flowers do you want?”

For me dying was not an option. My mother and I looked at all the treatment options. We told the doctor that I was going to be a long term lupus survivor. My doctor took my mother aside and suggested that was unlikely. Shortly afterwards I found a different rheumatologist. Patients have the right to change doctors, and I did.

My new doctor had a good understanding of the spectrum of illness that lupus can cause. He also knew that when he suggested any change to my treatment that my mother would say, “If your daughter had lupus, would you give this medication to her?” Our doctor-patient relationship lasted 30 years and was one of mutual respect.

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How Can Doctors Manage Their Online Presence?

How Can Doctors Manage Their Online Presence? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Online reviews can help or hurt any business. A doctor’s reputation is no different.

As a doctor you want as many people saying good things about you and your surgery as possible. People are more likely to visit you depending on the content of the review. Your own posts also mean a lot to people. What kind of message are you sending online? How can you craft your online messages to attract and keep more of your patients? You can manage your online presence easily and effectively with some of these tips.

LinkedIn Page

A LinkedIn page could be just what you need to keep a professional image online. People can see and rate your practice. They can also start discussions about your services as a doctor. A LinkedIn page gives you the chance to show and tell people your skills. You only have to update this page once every few days to stay current in the minds of your patients. If your patients are business owners and other busy professionals, then they will appreciate the ability to keep up with their surgeon on LinkedIn. Your practice will benefit from LinkedIn.

Facebook

 

Facebook is much more informal than LinkedIn. For that reason you should be careful about what you post on Facebook. But a quality page can attract more people than LinkedIn. You are more likely to connect with people who are looking for a clinic on Facebook. People often ask their Facebook friends for recommendations on new doctors in their area. You have the opportunity to position yourself as the go-to doctor in your specialty in your area with help from Facebook. The good news about your practice will spread quickly. Like LinkedIn, you can update your Facebook page every other day for best results.

Blog

You should start a blog for your clinic’s website. A quality blog post can establish you as a surgery expert. Longer posts show people what you know as well as your beliefs about being a surgeon. The best part about promoting a blog is that you can use LinkedIn and Facebook to get more people to read it. Your smaller updates on social media can help people connect with you. Your larger blog posts will educate them on you and your services. You will reach a larger audience in no time with the help of social media and blogs. You only need to make a longer blog post once per week.

YouTube

You could also create a YouTube video for your current and prospective patients. It’s always nice to see someone’s face and hear them talk directly to you. You would only have to create a YouTube video once every few months. But of course you could make videos more often if you like. You can introduce yourself and tell people what your skills and abilities include. Humans like working with people they can see and trust. A video increases your visibility, and it boosts your credibility as a quality surgeon with good people skills.

Social media and blogs will work in tandem to create an impressive online presence for any doctor. You can always pay someone to write blog posts and manage your social media profiles. Be sure to emphasize your surgical abilities as well as your ability to connect with people on a caring level.



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Study: Twitter can boost health research

Study: Twitter can boost health research | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

While healthcare practitioners ponder the best way to incorporate social media into their lives or practices, Twitter may be a useful tool in gauging both feedback from consumers and for furthering research, according to a recent study.


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The best medical apps released in 2014 - iMedicalApps

The best medical apps released in 2014 - iMedicalApps | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
A review of the best medical apps released this past year.

Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, dbtmobile
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Guidance Agenda: New & Revised Draft Guidances CDER i Planning to Publish Durin Calendar Year 2015

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SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING : L'ECOUTE DU WEB POUR LA PHARMA #hcsmeufr

1 recherche sur 20 faite sur Google concerne la santé..25 % des conversations sur les réseaux sociaux aussi.. des milliards d'informations qui pourraient en di…

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, February 20, 1:07 PM

qqs slides bien intéressantes a la fin de la pres...