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Social media e promozione della salute

Social media e promozione della salute | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Scoop.it … nuovi strumenti per guadagnare salute. Un manuale operativo per cittadini, medici, infermieri, amministratori.


#HealthPromotion

La rivoluzione digitale porta con sé novità e trasformazioni che cambiano anche la “galassia salute”. In questo campo il progresso tecnologico ci porta a riflettere sull’impatto che l’evoluzione digitale avrà sui determinanti sociali della salute (Weiner 2012). Le nuove piattaforme stanno trasformando il modo in cui i cittadini e gli operatori sanitari interagiscono quotidianamente; usate in modo corretto rappresentano una nuova opportunità per costruire comunità sostenibili e riorientare i nostri comportamenti.

“Salute” e “Promozione della salute” sono in costante evoluzione e i progressi sono quotidiani; internet, app, mobile e gli strumenti del web 2.0 consentono una diffusione tanto rapida quanto capillare di queste conquiste. Per medici e professionisti si è perciò, aperta una grande opportunità di incontro, di condivisione di informazioni e dati, di vicinanza al territorio che li porta a studiare e utilizzare tali tecnologie. 
Grazie al web 2.0 i pazienti rivendicano un ruolo attivo nelle decisioni “Citizen included” (Lucien Engelen 2013, e-Patient Dave deBronkart 2014).

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» Le Top 10 mondial des laboratoires pharmaceutiques en 2014 MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé

» Le Top 10 mondial des laboratoires pharmaceutiques en 2014 MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Le Leem, qui vient de publier les chiffres clefs de l’industrie pharmaceutique en 2014, a fait le point sur le marché mondial du médicament. Ce dernier est évalué à environ 910 milliards de dollars de chiffre d’affaires en 2014 (contre moins de 200 milliards de dollars en 1990), en croissance de 8,8 % par rapport à 2013.
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Oncology hashtag project offers way to use social media to make finding accurate cancer info easier - MedCity News

Oncology hashtag project offers way to use social media to make finding accurate cancer info easier - MedCity News | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it


A physician unveiled a poster at ASCO15 that demonstrated the interest in oncology on Twitter with the development of hashtags dedicated to specific types of cancer. The goal was to help stimulate and direct twitter conversations to provides another source of information, boost patient education and stimulate advocacy. Dr. Matthew Katz, a radiation oncologist, founded Rad Nation, a community of radiation oncologists.

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Me Too! Physicians: Study Finds Prescribers Susceptible to Peer Pressure

Me Too! Physicians: Study Finds Prescribers Susceptible to Peer Pressure | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Like teenage girls unsure of the latest fashion, doctors are susceptible to the social influence of their peers when it comes to prescribing both new and repeat drugs, according to a new Wharton School study. And not unlike said teens, peer influencers change over time. With doctors, however, the study found that the changes occur as a drug moves from new and risky to recurrent status.


The Wharton professors divided doctors' influencer colleagues into two groups: those who are "co-located," whether that meant partners in a practice or colleagues at a larger medical facility, and those who are "networked neighbors" or fellow doctors who are part of a wider network used when seeking consultations or advice.


While both groups were very influential in determining whether a doctor will initially prescribe a drug, only the co-located physicians continued to hold sway on whether the doctor would continue to write the prescription, said Raghuram Iyengar, associate professor of marketing at University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School and coauthor of the report, published recently in Informs' Marketing Science.


Iyengar said the findings mean that pharma should be shifting marketing strategies as a drug moves through trial to repeat use. Targeting influencers works as an initial strategy, but moving down the physician influence chain when the drug is up for repeated use is a better second-line strategy.


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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, Today, 2:38 AM

is it true also for vaccines?

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Physicians & Twitter - To Tweet or Not to Tweet? | Sara T, M.D.

Physicians & Twitter - To Tweet or Not to Tweet? | Sara T, M.D. | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
“Creativity is just connecting things.” ~ Steve Jobs 

If you could see me responding to this question, I would almost be jumping up and down exclaiming, “Yes, absolutely!” Rewind to about 3 years ago and I was admittedly not entirely sure what social media entailed. I didn’t even have a personal Facebook account, and that was before the influx of so many other social media platforms. Through taking an online blogging course, I quickly became aware of the importance, and ultimately the crucial aspect of social media for a blogger with a website. In turn, I believe the benefits of social media extend way beyond this scope, and in particular in my case, the medical community.

Why Tweet?

Social media can be overwhelming if you approach it by trying to engage via all of the available platforms. What can be seen as an avenue to reduce your stress, can quickly turn into a recipe for increasing your stress. Based on my experience exploring various types of social media over the last 2 ½ years, Twitter is the best fit for physicians. It may not seem feasible to convey your message in only 140 characters, but you would be surprised with the addition of a link and a couple of hashtags the power of a tweet. The medical community presence on Twitter continues to grow all over the world from medical students to practicing physicians. I recently read an article on the in-Training website, Should Medical Students Be Using Twitter?, further supporting Twitter use during medical education.

What are the Benefits of Twitter for Physicians?

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Can Fitbits Be Trusted In Science?

Can Fitbits Be Trusted In Science? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Fitbit says its devices shouldn't be used for medical or scientific reasons. Thanks to their low cost and high ease of use, researchers are thinking about doing so anyway. There's just one problem:...
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Instagram and Clinical Infectious Diseases

Instagram and Clinical Infectious Diseases | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

TO THE EDITOR—We read the article by Goff et al [1] with great interest regarding the relevance of social media (SM) platform Twitter to infectious diseases clinicians. We concur with the authors regarding the relevance of SM tools to infectious diseases practice and wish to call attention to the photograph-based SM platform, Instagram, as an emerging site of interest.

Instagram is a free SM platform launched in October of 2010 that has been a part of Facebook, Inc., since April 2012 [2]. The platform reports a community of 300 million users as of December 2014. Each day users from around the world (>70% are outside the US) register >2.5 billion “likes” and share …

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The Power of Twitter - A Physician Blogger’s Perspective

The Power of Twitter - A Physician Blogger’s Perspective | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

When I first started my blog/website over 2 years ago, I remember that even the thought of social media sent waves of anxiety through me. Despite this and after taking a blogging course, I knew I had to have a social media presence, but admittedly, I still didn’t really understand social media. I had never been a personal Facebook (FB) or Instagram user like so many other people I knew, and therefore, I wasn’t sure where to begin navigating these seemingly murky waters. My angst was further fuelled by the fact that physicians at that time were extremely reluctant to engage on social media (many still are).

After trying almost every platform imaginable, I initially settled comfortably on Twitter and Pinterest to focus my energy. Still knowing that I had to post on FB to broaden my footprint, I directed all of my tweets to FB with intermittent FB specific posts. Today, I can honestly say that I am a true Twitter advocate and although have learned a lot, I fully realize that it has so much more to offer and that I have so much more to learn.

The Power of Twitter

I have written about Twitter before and my reasons to tweet, especially as a physician, continue to grow. Engagement and education are my top 2 reasons for believing in Twitter so strongly. Everyone tweets for different reasons, but the fundamental reason would still be engagement. This is why so many businesses, organizations, celebrities, and the general public have embraced Twitter. With over 302 million active users monthly, it is hard to ignore the power of Twitter and its ability to connect with anyone anywhere.

The attention social media has in relation to physician use has certainly shifted from negative to positive. Without question, physicians have to be careful with what they post and share, but this goes for anyone. Twitter isn’t a venue to air grievances, divulge privacy, be disrespectful or inappropriate. Instead, even the president of the Canadian Medical Association, Dr. Chris Simpson, is quoted in Maclean’s Magazine saying, “Twitter is a fantastic way to bring medical literacy to the general public”.

In fact, the positive light being shone on Twitter in healthcare continues to grow. The esteemed Mayo Clinic has developed the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media (MCCSM)where they strive “To be the authentic voice for patients and health care professionals, building collaborative relationships through the revolutionary power of social media.” This organization is an excellent resource for using social media in healthcare and really highlights that we are only on the cusp of what social media has to offer for both providers and consumers.

The last point I want to make illustrates the true power of Twitter. A few people I follow on Twitter often retweet the Twitter handle @AcademicsSay. I was always curious and amused by the tweets, especially since his twitter account name included a profanity. The following is an example tweet:

Shit Academics Say ‏‪@AcademicsSay Jun 29 – “I do my best proofreading after I hit send.”

Retweets 1,136 & Favorites 1,487

Subsequently, through Twitter, I came across the article @AcademicsSay: The story behind a social media experiment in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Nathan Hall, an associate professor and self-titled academic, started the account in 2013 and now it has grown to over 122,00o followers, gaining 250 to 300 new followers a day. Hall says, “…growing an anonymous parody account seemed like a not-boring way to poke fun at the profession that made my head hurt, maybe take myself a bit less seriously, and test an alternative hypothesis that I was not alone in being confounded by the curiosities and psychological challenges of an academic career.” He goes on to say that he realized the power of community building that Twitter offered as followers not only appreciated the jokes, but also the sharing of relevant information. As well, he was able to connect with influential people in his field, garnering more opportunities including jump-starting meaningful work through large-scale studies on self-regulation and well-being in academia. What started out as a fun past-time turned into fulfilling work through greater connectivity – thereby supporting the power of Twitter.



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Who Are Patient Portals Really For? | THCB

Who Are Patient Portals Really For? | THCB | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
I find it remarkable that the industry pushes us so hard to use these patient portals, since they offer so little of value to meeting our health needs. With more portals launching every week, and an estimated $900 million spent on them annually by 2017, more and more “patients” will be asking themselves the question, “What am I supposed to do with this?”

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Report: Instagram Now Getting More Brand Posts Than Facebook

Report: Instagram Now Getting More Brand Posts Than Facebook | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Brands are now posting more content to Instagram than they are on Facebook, according to a new report by research firm L2.

It’s not quite an unfriending situation. More like brands have found a new best friend.

You can probably guess the reason. Giving plunging organic reach on Facebook, marketers have been cutting back on posting on Facebook and paying for reach with advertising dollars, the report says. On the other hand, Instagram is mostly a free-for-all. The Facebook-owned photo-sharing network has some advertising options but most brand activity is organic, and user feeds, although growing more competitive, are still unfettered by algorithm, meaning that, at least in theory, consumers who follow a brand will see all of that brand’s posts.


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A brief history of Digital Health – Part 2

A brief history of Digital Health – Part 2 | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
How do you think digital health will evolve in the future? Share your ideas with us in the comments section below. Make sure you check out Part 1 of Lorena’s brief history of Digital Health here
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Castres-Mazamet Technopole's curator insight, July 24, 2:43 AM

#esante A brief history of Digital Health

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So Many Social Networks, So Little ROI — and How to Solve the Problem - MediBeauty Today

So Many Social Networks, So Little ROI — and How to Solve the Problem - MediBeauty Today | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Snapchat, Instagram, Ello, oh my. Seems like every time you turn around, there’s a new social networking site that promises to introduce you and your practice to legions of people who will then click over to your website, fill out a form and schedule a consult or surgery.

Or so the story goes. The fact is, different social networks do different things well and trying to keep up with too many of them is a recipe for exhaustion, ineffective marketing and a poor return on your investment. When it comes to reaching aesthetic consumers, it’s not about quantity; it’s about quality and the key to delivering it effectively is to provide the right content to the right people wherever they are. 

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Twitter Tips - A Physician Blogger’s Perspective

Twitter Tips - A Physician Blogger’s Perspective | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

“When people come to Twitter and they want to express something in the world, the technology fades away. It’s them writing a simple message and them knowing that people are going to see it.” ~ Jack Dorsey, Founder of Twitter (from Brainy Quote)

Listen to today’s post on the go or continue reading below …

Audio Player

 

Last week we discussed the power of Twitter. This week, as an extension of that, I wanted to discuss some Twitter tips I have learned along the way over the past 2 ½ years. As you can tell, I am very passionate about Twitter, and social media in general, despite my initial reservations. I am currently reading Social Media in Clinical Practice, and to illustrate our rapidly changing digital world, some of the information has significantly evolved in the 2 years since it was printed. Its author, Bertalan Mesko, spends some time explaining the history of social media, which is useful when you consider where it began and where we are today. One of the articles he cites, Users of the world unite! The challenges and opportunities of Social Media, defines social media as: “…a group of Internet-based applications that build on the ideological and technological foundations of Web 2.0*, and that allow the creation and exchange of User Generated Content”. Although the article goes into great detail, the general idea behind social media is the exchange of information. In the case of Twitter, the information has to be 140 characters or less. It sounds limiting, but as it turns out, you can convey a lot of information within those parameters.

Twitter tips

By no means is the following list all inclusive, but instead, just some of the more important tips that I feel I have learned along the way as both a physician blogger and Twitter engager:

1) Understand some basics. The @ symbol comes before your username, also referred to as a Twitter handle. Hashtags are denoted by the # symbol and allow you to be part of a conversation, categorize tweets and add flare to a tweet. Be careful though, do not to overdo hashtags – maximum 3 per tweet.

2) What constitutes an ideal tweet? If you look at some of the most retweeted content, you quickly realize no hard-fast rules exist. In general, when sharing educational material, a few words followed by the title of the article, the URL, the relevant Twitter handle(s), and 1 to 3 hashtags.

3) If you start a tweet with the @symbol, Twitter considers it a private conversation between you and the Twitter user you are referring to. This has its advantages for sure. If you want to start a tweet with a Twitter handle, but want it to appear for everyone to see, you can start the tweet with a period.

4) What is the perfect number of tweets a day? Social media frequency has been researched and analyzed, but the bottom line revolves around 3 key factors – consistency, quality and personality. To each his own, but I aim for 3 to 5 ‘quality’ tweets per day.

5) Avoid looking like spam. When I look at someone’s Twitter feed and it is full of either links to their website/blog or their own tweets with little evidence that they share other people’s information, it comes across as ‘spammy’ to me.

6) Only follow who you want to follow. What do I mean by this? Some people ‘unfollow’ people who don’t follow them back. In some cases, this behaviour may help your decision when you are ‘on the fence’, but don’t let it guide who you follow.

7) Twitter is all about engagement. If someone mentions you, reply. I continue to work on how best to do this. For instance, if someone retweets a tweet of mine that has original content (i.e. a link to one of my posts), I will thank them. Also, you can engage in a conversation about a tweet. You can see it when you click on the tweet. This is still a work in progress for me. Finally, look for Twitter chats (scheduled times for a live Twitter conversation) that you might be interested in joining. I recently discovered @WeDocs (#WeDocs), part of the We Communities that meets once a month.

8) If you like something, but don’t want to necessarily retweet it, click ‘Favorite’. You can look back on these tweets as well. If you love a tweet, you may want to both retweet it and favorite it!

9) Try to add a personal touch and have some fun! As with any online content, a personal touch can go a long way. If people can get to know and identify with a real person behind the tweets, you are more likely to find other like-minded people to engage with.

Are you on Twitter? If so, what tips can you pass along that you have found to be helpful? If not, why not start today.

SaraTMD

*Web 2.0 is a term that was first used in 2004 to describe a new way in which software developers and end-users started to utilize the World Wide Web; that is, as a platform whereby content and applications are no longer published by individuals, but instead are continuously modified by users in a participatory and collaborative fashion.²

Resources

1. Mesko, B. (2013). Social Media in Clinical Practice. Springer: London.

2. Kaplan, A.M. & Haenlein, M. (2010). Users of the world unite! The challenges and opportunities of social media. Business Horizons, 53, 59-68.

3. Twitter Tips for Beginners: Everything I Wish I Knew About Twitter When I Started



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Topol: Apple Watch helps colleague's patient self-diagnose

Topol: Apple Watch helps colleague's patient self-diagnose | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Without the data from the Apple Watch, would the patient even have taken the time to Google the symptoms and call the doctor?
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Millennials: healthy or hurting when it comes to health literacy?

Millennials: healthy or hurting when it comes to health literacy? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
New research on Millennials shows early half of 18 to 24 years don't know that the emergency room is the most costly place to get urgent care.
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Magazine de l'innovation n°7 : E-santé / objets connectés

Regarder la vidéo «Magazine de l'innovation n°7 : E-santé / objets connectés» envoyée par LEEM les entreprises du médicament sur dailymotion.


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Dr GOOGLE , promu lanceur d'alerte par la FDA - Pharmacovigilance pour tous

Dr GOOGLE , promu lanceur d'alerte par la FDA - Pharmacovigilance pour tous | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
information n’est pas passée inaperçue sur les réseaux sociaux à propos du moteur de recherche Google qui pourrait aider l’agence américaine du médicament (FDA) à détecter les effets secondaires des médicaments.

Via EVELYNE PIERRON
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EVELYNE PIERRON's curator insight, July 27, 3:15 PM

L'information n’est pas passée inaperçue sur les réseaux sociaux à propos du moteur de recherche Google qui pourrait aider l’agence américaine du médicament (FDA) à détecter les effets secondaires des médicaments.

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How High-Tech Patient Portals Will Revolutionize Health Care

How High-Tech Patient Portals Will Revolutionize Health Care | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
BOB WACHTER: As the health-care world finally shifts from analog to digital, increasing numbers of patients have access to a patient portal–a site that allows them to schedule appointments, email their physicians, refill medications, and check the results of laboratory studies.
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Infographie : Santé connectée, pratiques et attentes des internautes

Infographie : Santé connectée, pratiques et attentes des internautes | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
CCM Benchmark vient de publier sa dernière étude « Santé connectée » à la suite d'une enquête en ligne menée sur le panel de consommateurs CCM Benchmark Panel. Cette infographie met en évidence les principaux résultats de cette étude. On y apprend par exemple que 56% des internautes ont consulté une information santé sur Internet au cours des 6 derniers mois.

Découvrez l'infographie :

Via L'Université d'été de la e-santé, DIRECT MEDICA, umanlife, Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz
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Infographic: Using mHealth to facilitate end-of-life care | mHealthNews

Infographic: Using mHealth to facilitate end-of-life care | mHealthNews | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Today is National Healthcare Decisions Day (NHDD), "a day devoted to encouraging the completion of advance directives." When discussing end-of-life care, it's a delicate issue that has to be handled carefully - and one in which mHealth can play an important role.

"There are serious communication challenges around advance care planning and they contribute to the emotional and financial burdens on patients, their families and their caretakers," Geri Lynn Baumblatt, executive director of patient engagement for Emmi Solutions, said in a press release. "Empowering people to make decisions about their own care before reaching a point where they can no longer speak for themselves can shift that experience from one of stress and confusion to one where everyone involved including the family and care team is readily prepared to follow the person's wishes."



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Turn Off Social Media When You Take A Vacation: The Argument - PopCrunch

Turn Off Social Media When You Take A Vacation: The Argument - PopCrunch | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
“Some people spend all their time on a vacation taking pictures so that when they get home they can show their friends evidence that they had a good time. They don't pause to let the vacation enter inside of them and take that home.

Technology is a filter that removes you from present experiences. We see it all the time at dinner, when friends have to remember to put their phones down and actually talk to each other. We see it on trains and buses, when people miss their stops because they’re absorbed in their devices, or fail to connect to their surroundings because they’ve got their earbuds in. They may as well be somewhere else.

I’m be the first to admit a social media and cell phone addiction. In part, I blame my job. As a blogger and a writer, I tweet articles and blog posts. I Instagram almost daily, making sure my photos have a certain aesthetic and that they’re on brand. It’s all stupid of course, but it’s unfortunately necessary. And I’m grateful for this five-inch rectangle of magic, because it gave me a career. Simple as that.


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malek's curator insight, July 24, 9:57 AM

Tried and failed, so where you are?

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How Pharma Can Offer More than Pills

How Pharma Can Offer More than Pills | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

A better way to get into services.


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5 Reasons Pharma Should Reconsider Instagram

5 Reasons Pharma Should Reconsider Instagram | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

More and more, Instagram is becoming a viable social channel for pharma, if used in the right way. So here are five reasons we believe pharmas should take a new look at Instagram.


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Technology in medical education: Beneficial or a distraction?

Technology in medical education: Beneficial or a distraction? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

There are some schools including medical schools that ban gadgets especially inside a classroom. In these cases, gadgets are believed to be a distraction as there

There are some schools including medical schools that ban gadgets especially inside a classroom. In these cases, gadgets are believed to be a distraction as there is the fear that students might be texting, surfing the net, or opening some entertaining apps instead of listening to a lecture, performing an experiment, accomplishing an exercise or studying. Gadgets might also lead to class disruption.

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Aesthetic Consumers Choose Doctors Who Respond to Online Inquiries - MediBeauty Today

Aesthetic Consumers Choose Doctors Who Respond to Online Inquiries - MediBeauty Today | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Funny thing about the Internet: despite its undeniable ability to supplant face-to-face contact, the people who use it still take their interactions on it very personally. In fact, when you think about, it may just be the medium’s depersonalized nature that makes personal interactions online so powerful.

That’s certainly the case with doctors’ responses to aesthetic consumers who contact their practices via the Web. At RealSelf, we conduct regular surveys of our user community and their comments clearly demonstrate that doctors who respond quickly and personally are more likely to convert those leads into patients.

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