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#SocialMedia medici e pazienti, verso una nuova apomediazione

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Arianna Donti's curator insight, November 3, 2016 4:58 AM
My new article on "Il Sole 24 Ore Sanità" about the controversial relationship between Doctors, Patients and #SocialMedia.
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Has online health information changed the physician-patient relationship?

Has online health information changed the physician-patient relationship? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

 As patients have better access to health information through the Internet and expect to be more engaged in health decision making, traditional models of the patient-provider relationship and communication strategies must be revisited to adapt to this changing demographic.

 

Physicians often don’t have the time to explain the complex world of medicine to patients. While more people are going online for health information the Internet can be like a jungle with many false trails to supposed health information.  For the most part, it’s up to online health seekers to determine what is “real” and ‘trusted” as opposed to false and fake.  Within lies a great opportunity for pharma companies.


Via Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz
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“Mommy Blogs” and the Vaccination Exemption Narrative: Results From A Machine-Learning Approach for Story Aggregation on Parenting Social Media Sites

“Mommy Blogs” and the Vaccination Exemption Narrative: Results From A Machine-Learning Approach for Story Aggregation on Parenting Social Media Sites | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Background: Social media offer an unprecedented opportunity to explore how people talk about health care at a very large scale. Numerous studies have shown the importance of websites with user forums for people seeking information related to health. Parents turn to some of these sites, colloquially referred to as “mommy blogs,” to share concerns about children’s health care, including vaccination. Although substantial work has considered the role of social media, particularly Twitter, in discussions of vaccination and other health care–related issues, there has been little work on describing the underlying structure of these discussions and the role of persuasive storytelling, particularly on sites with no limits on post length. Understanding the role of persuasive storytelling at Internet scale provides useful insight into how people discuss vaccinations, including exemption-seeking behavior, which has been tied to a recent diminution of herd immunity in some communities.

Objective: To develop an automated and scalable machine-learning method for story aggregation on social media sites dedicated to discussions of parenting. We wanted to discover the aggregate narrative frameworks to which individuals, through their exchange of experiences and commentary, contribute over time in a particular topic domain. We also wanted to characterize temporal trends in these narrative frameworks on the sites over the study period.

Methods: To ensure that our data capture long-term discussions and not short-term reactions to recent events, we developed a dataset of 1.99 million posts contributed by 40,056 users and viewed 20.12 million times indexed from 2 parenting sites over a period of 105 months. Using probabilistic methods, we determined the topics of discussion on these parenting sites. We developed a generative statistical-mechanical narrative model to automatically extract the underlying stories and story fragments from millions of posts. We aggregated the stories into an overarching narrative framework graph. In our model, stories were represented as network graphs with actants as nodes and their various relationships as edges. We estimated the latent stories circulating on these sites by modeling the posts as a sampling of the hidden narrative framework graph. Temporal trends were examined based on monthly user-poststatistics.

Results: We discovered that discussions of exemption from vaccination requirements are highly represented. We found a strong narrative framework related to exemption seeking and a culture of distrust of government and medical institutions. Various posts reinforced part of the narrative framework graph in which parents, medical professionals, and religious institutions emerged as key nodes, and exemption seeking emerged as an important edge. In the aggregate story, parents used religion or belief to acquire exemptions to protect their children from vaccines that are required by schools or government institutions, but (allegedly) cause adverse reactions such as autism, pain, compromised immunity, and even death. Although parents joined and left the discussion forums over time, discussions and stories about exemptions were persistent and robust to these membership changes.

Conclusions: Analyzing parent forums about health care using an automated analytic approach, such as the one presented here, allows the detection of widespread narrative frameworks that structure and inform discussions. In most vaccination stories from the sites we analyzed, it is taken for granted that vaccines and not vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs) pose a threat to children. Because vaccines are seen as a threat, parents focus on sharing successful strategies for avoiding them, with exemption being the foremost among these strategies. When new parents join such sites, they may be exposed to this endemic narrative framework in the threads they read and to which they contribute, which may influence their health care decision making.

 

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10 things for pharma marketers to know about Facebook and Instagram

10 things for pharma marketers to know about Facebook and Instagram | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

According to Facebook Health industry manager Danielle Salowski, it's the combination of reach, scale, and engagement that make Facebook and Instagram useful tools for healthcare marketers. Facebook reaches 1.7 billion people around the world per month; on mobile, it reaches more than one billion people every day. Similarly, there are 500 million people using Instagram every month and 300 million each day.

 


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Rémy TESTON, Philippe Marchal
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La fondazione di Bill Gates supporta un dispositivo impiantabile contro l'HIV

La fondazione di Bill Gates supporta un dispositivo impiantabile contro l'HIV | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
140 milioni di dollari di finanziamento per Intracia Therapeutics, che sviluppa un dispositivo impiantabile per l'erogazione quotidiana di farmaci, così da venire in supporto alle strategie di profilassi pre-esposizione

La Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, la fondazione creata nel 2000 da Bill Gates e dalla moglie e che si occupa di supportare le attività di ricerca medica per la lotta all'AIDS e alla malaria, ha deciso di investire 140 milioni di dollari a favore di Intarcia Therapeutics, società biofarmaceutica di Boston che ha sviluppato un piccolo dispositivo impiantabile capace di erogare in maniera automatica una dose quotidiana di medicinale. Il finanziamento fa parte di un fondo di 1,5 miliardi creato dalla Gates Foundation allo scopo di investire nel settore privato per lo sviluppo di tecnologie che permettano di portare avanti la missione della fondazione.

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Gamification for health promotion: systematic review of behaviour change techniques in smartphone apps

Abstract

Objective Smartphone games that aim to alter health behaviours are common, but there is uncertainty about how to achieve this. We systematically reviewed health apps containing gaming elements analysing their embedded behaviour change techniques.

Methods Two trained researchers independently coded apps for behaviour change techniques using a standard taxonomy. We explored associations with user ratings and price.

Data sources We screened the National Health Service (NHS) Health Apps Library and all top-rated medical, health and wellness and health and fitness apps (defined by Apple and Google Play stores based on revenue and downloads). We included free and paid English language apps using ‘gamification’ (rewards, prizes, avatars, badges, leaderboards, competitions, levelling-up or health-related challenges). We excluded apps targeting health professionals.

Results 64 of 1680 (4%) health apps included gamification and met inclusion criteria; only 3 of these were in the NHS Library. Behaviour change categories used were: feedback and monitoring (n=60, 94% of apps), reward and threat (n=52, 81%), and goals and planning (n=52, 81%). Individual techniques were: self-monitoring of behaviour (n=55, 86%), non-specific reward (n=49, 82%), social support unspecified (n=48, 75%), non-specific incentive (n=49, 82%) and focus on past success (n=47, 73%). Median number of techniques per app was 14 (range: 5–22). Common combinations were: goal setting, self-monitoring, non-specific reward and non-specific incentive (n=35, 55%); goal setting, self-monitoring and focus on past success (n=33, 52%). There was no correlation between number of techniques and user ratings (p=0.07; rs=0.23) or price (p=0.45; rs=0.10).

Conclusions Few health apps currently employ gamification and there is a wide variation in the use of behaviour change techniques, which may limit potential to improve health outcomes. We found no correlation between user rating (a possible proxy for health benefits) and game content or price. Further research is required to evaluate effective behaviour change techniques and to assess clinical outcomes.

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The Rise of Consumer Health Wearables: Promises and Barriers

The Rise of Consumer Health Wearables: Promises and Barriers | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Will consumer wearable technology ever be adopted or accepted by the medical community? Patients and practitioners regularly use digital technology (e.g., thermometers and glucose monitors) to identify and discuss symptoms. In addition, a third of general practitioners in the United Kingdom report that patients arrive with suggestions for treatment based on online search results [1]. However, consumer health wearables are predicted to become the next “Dr Google.” One in six (15%) consumers in the United States currently uses wearable technology, including smartwatches or fitness bands. While 19 million fitness devices are likely to be sold this year, that number is predicted to grow to 110 million in 2018 [2]. As the line between consumer health wearables and medical devices begins to blur, it is now possible for a single wearable device to monitor a range of medical risk factors (Fig 1). Potentially, these devices could give patients direct access to personal analytics that can contribute to their health, facilitate preventive care, and aid in the management of ongoing illness. However, how this new wearable technology might best serve medicine remains unclear.
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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, December 22, 2016 5:59 AM
Les Wearables sont très attendus, mais quid de la fiabilité et de la sécurité des données ?
JEAN PASCAL POISSONNET's curator insight, January 10, 10:43 AM
A comprehensive work on wearables and health particularly to the point, when handling the question : do wearables affect wearers behaviour? The answer seems to be : yes but marginally and not over a long period of time. Promises are better identified in the case of follow up for patients with serious or chronic diseases. Seems to me that patients will more and more make the difference between wearables for well being and wearables that clearly bring an added value where heath stakes are higher. So will doctors.  
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Healthcare Technology Trends to Watch Out For In 2017

Healthcare Technology Trends to Watch Out For In 2017 | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
2017 is almost upon us. And with it brings the predictions and expectations of the trends that may have significant impact on the industry in the next four quarters. And, healthcare in 2017 is no different. There are many innovative and exciting technology trends on the horizon – some new and some newly maturing that promise to leave an impression “Healthcare Technology Trends to Watch Out For In 2017”
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JEAN PASCAL POISSONNET's curator insight, January 20, 7:24 AM
From AI to bots, wearables, blockchain, this article gives a wide though precise panorama of emerging technology trends that will deeply influence healthcare practice.
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What if Dr House used Twitter?: Bertalan Mesko at TEDxNijmegen 

He is a medical futurist who started out being a project leader of 'personalised medicine through genomics' at the Center for Clinical Genomics and Personalised Medicine at the University of Debrecen.
His peculiar skill: he was able to filter his medical knowledge online and create a medical network that could help the community crowdsourcing medical questions.

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Art Jones's curator insight, December 11, 2016 4:30 PM

Enlightened Messenger + A Medium that moves at friction-less speed of the internet = Enhanced Access to Knowledge

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La recherche contre le cancer  ne doit plus se faire sans les citoyens

La recherche contre le cancer  ne doit plus se faire sans les citoyens | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Tribune. Pour le docteur Fabien Reyal, chirurgien spécialiste du cancer du sein à l’Institut Curie, il ne peut y avoir demain de médecine personnalisée sans un collectif fort.

En France, 350 000 personnes sont atteintes chaque année d’un cancer. Ce constat est connu de tous, le cancer est une maladie fréquente. Nous sommes pourtant à un tournant de l’histoire, où les possibilités technologiques servant à comprendre le vivant, la diversité des molécules existantes et la qualité des traitements devraient permettre de proposer une médecine personnalisée efficace pour les patients.

Mais pour identifier la bonne combinaison entre un type de cancer, un traitement et un patient, nous devons d’abord identifier ces trois éléments. Il est alors essentiel que les citoyens se mobilisent fortement, car il n’y aura pas de médecine personnalisée sans un collectif fort.

Une transition rapide doit se faire pour que le citoyen passe du statut d’objet de recherche à celui de partenaire de recherche. Deux raisons ­essentielles à cela. Tout d’abord, parce que plus une maladie est rare, plus il est nécessaire que les patients s’impliquent. Les cancers sont en fait la somme de multiples maladies rares. Ensuite, parce que le processus de ­recherche est trop souvent inefficace.

Le nombre d’études qui n’ont pas abouti en raison d’un nombre insuffisant de patients est trop important. Le temps écoulé entre l’identification d’un type particulier de cancer et l’hypothèse d’un nouveau traitement est trop long.

Il faut donc faire évoluer l’écosystème de la recherche. Pour cela, quatre axes de réflexion.


En savoir plus sur http://www.lemonde.fr/sciences/article/2016/12/05/la-recherche-contre-le-cancer-ne-doit-plus-se-faire-sans-les-citoyens_5043568_1650684.html#Kk086ojou07mIWw7.99


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Why does self-diagnosis annoy doctors?

Why does self-diagnosis annoy doctors? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Our patients have used Google for quite sometime now to look up symptoms and find more information about their health. Yes, these are Filipino patients. I’m seeing more of them. And no, I don’t have Philippine data to substantiate this – but it doesn’t mean it’s not happening.  Googling may lead to self-diagnosis which can sometimes be correct and sometimes not. The doctor is the one who can confirm the diagnosis. The doctor should not be annoyed that a patient has gotten a self-diagnosis off the internet. Obviously, if the patient was satisfied with what Dr. Google had told him, he would not have still gone and seen the doctor.
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 La data sera le principal moteur de l'innovation e-santé en 2017

 La data sera le principal moteur de l'innovation e-santé en 2017 | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Selon une nouvelle étude de la Silicon Valley Bank, l’IA, le Big Data et l’IoT sont susceptibles d’avoir un impact majeur sur les prestations et l’investissement dans les soins de santé en 2017.

Ce sondage, qui prend en compte 122 fondateurs d’entreprises de e-santé et investisseurs, indique une croyance générale étant que le Big Data continue d’être le moteur principal de l’innovation dans l’industrie de la santé. Toutefois, ce rapport souligne également que ce secteur peut rencontrer des problèmes d’adoption et des obstacles réglementaires dans un futur proche.

 


Via Chanfimao
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JEAN PASCAL POISSONNET's curator insight, January 5, 11:29 AM
Big Data et IA comme moteurs principaux des innovations en e-sante selon ce sondage auprès d'entrepreneurs dans le domaine. Couple logique sur les données et les moyens les exploiter. L'univers réglementaire encore fluctuant peut toutefois freiner la diffusion de certaines technologies liées aux objets connectés (adoption critique et prudente par les patients et les professionnels). 
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American Public Health Association - Twitter as a Tool for Health Research: A Systematic Review

American Public Health Association - Twitter as a Tool for Health Research: A Systematic Review | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Background. Researchers have used traditional databases to study public health for decades. Less is known about the use of social media data sources, such as Twitter, for this purpose.

Objectives. To systematically review the use of Twitter in health research, define a taxonomy to describe Twitter use, and characterize the current state of Twitter in health research.

Search methods. We performed a literature search in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and CINAHL through September 2015.

Selection criteria. We searched for peer-reviewed original research studies that primarily used Twitter for health research.

Data collection and analysis. Two authors independently screened studies and abstracted data related to the approach to analysis of Twitter data, methodology used to study Twitter, and current state of Twitter research by evaluating time of publication, research topic, discussion of ethical concerns, and study funding source.

Main results. Of 1110 unique health-related articles mentioning Twitter, 137 met eligibility criteria. The primary approaches for using Twitter in health research that constitute a new taxonomy were content analysis (56%; n = 77), surveillance (26%; n = 36), engagement (14%; n = 19), recruitment (7%; n = 9), intervention (7%; n = 9), and network analysis (4%; n = 5). These studies collectively analyzed more than 5 billion tweets primarily by using the Twitter application program interface. Of 38 potential data features describing tweets and Twitter users, 23 were reported in fewer than 4% of the articles. The Twitter-based studies in this review focused on a small subset of data elements including content analysis, geotags, and language. Most studies were published recently (33% in 2015). Public health (23%; n = 31) and infectious disease (20%; n = 28) were the research fields most commonly represented in the included studies. Approximately one third of the studies mentioned ethical board approval in their articles. Primary funding sources included federal (63%), university (13%), and foundation (6%).

Conclusions. We identified a new taxonomy to describe Twitter use in health research with 6 categories. Many data elements discernible from a user’s Twitter profile, especially demographics, have been underreported in the literature and can provide new opportunities to characterize the users whose data are analyzed in these studies. Twitter-based health research is a growing field funded by a diversity of organizations.

Public health implications. Future work should develop standardized reporting guidelines for health researchers who use Twitter and policies that address privacy and ethical concerns in social media research.




Read More: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303512a?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&

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The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists

The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Despite frequent claims to the contrary, social media tools such as Twitter can be incredibly valuable for scholars. My own research (and years of personal experience) has shown that if properly used, Twitter makes it possible for scholars to follow along with cutting-edge research in their discipline as it is presented at conferences on the other side of the world, to directly share their expertise with policy makers and journalists, and to get feedback from expert peers as they work on their own research projects.

New research from the writers of the Fisheries Blog has revealed another professional benefit of social media usage for scholars. “We found that the number of tweets about a primary ecology research article was significantly correlated to the number of citations that the paper received,” said Brandon Peoples, assistant professor of fisheries ecology at Clemson University and the paper’s lead author. This new analysis notes that Twitter activity related to a paper predicted citations more than the 5-year impact factor of the journal where that paper was published, at least for ecology-focused journals.

This PLoS One paper , “Twitter predicts citation rates of ecological research,” is not the first to address this question, and past studies have found mixed results. However, Peoples noted that his new study took a different and more complex approach. “Several studies have looked at the relationship between various altmetrics, measures of activity on, for instance, Facebook, Twitter, or blog posts) and citations. Most of them have used simple bivariate correlations and have found weak relationships,” Peoples said. “What we did differently was account for other important sources of variation in the same model: time since publication, journal impact factor, and random variation among journals. This allowed us to identify the ‘signal’ of Twitter over the ‘noise’ produced by the other variables. You can’t do that with simple correlation analyses.”

Via Dominique Godefroy, Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz
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Topol, 'Mama Doc' on Social Media, Vaccines, and Disease Prevention

Topol, 'Mama Doc' on Social Media, Vaccines, and Disease Prevention | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

This is Dr Eric Topol, editor-in-chief of Medscape. This is Medscape One-on-One—interviews with some of the most interesting people in medicine. Today I am thrilled to have with me Dr Wendy Sue Swanson from Seattle Children's Hospital, certainly one of the most interesting people in the field of medicine. We are going to be talking about her role in social media in medicine, the recent measles outbreak, and other topics.

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How to set up and use a Twitter account professionally : Nursing Standard: Vol. 31, No. 10 (RCNi)

How to set up and use a Twitter account professionally : Nursing Standard: Vol. 31, No. 10 (RCNi) | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

This article encourages nurses to use Twitter to engage in professional discussions, share information and raise awareness of alternative views to enhance practice and patient care. Twitter is an online social media service that enables users to send and read 140-character messages called tweets.

»

Twitter is free and accessible across multiple platforms and devices, providing immediate contact with professionals, organisations and the public worldwide.

»

Many healthcare professionals use Twitter to share ideas and information.

»

Responsible use of Twitter creates opportunities to access information, discuss issues and challenge misconceptions to support professional nursing behaviours.




Read More: http://journals.rcni.com/doi/10.7748/ns.2016.e10560

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Digital Health’s Perfect Storm of Regulators

Digital Health’s Perfect Storm of Regulators | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Both developers and users of digital health solutions face both immense opportunities and daunting challenges. One key challenge is compliance with the often complex state and federal laws and regulations adopted by the numerous regulatory bodies responsible for overseeing different aspects of digital health. The following illustration identifies the numerous regulatory bodies that have been increasingly focused on the use of technology in healthcare and are expected to continue their focus and enforcement activities in the coming years.
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JEAN PASCAL POISSONNET's curator insight, December 26, 2016 10:26 AM
E-health: a jungle for professionals and patients. As regulation progresses at a slower pace than innovation, a strong relationship among health providers, patients and industry is key to built ethics and mutual confidence.
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Patients' online diagnoses not useful, say doctors - BBC News

Patients' online diagnoses not useful, say doctors - BBC News | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

A third of the UK physicians surveyed said patients would come with suggestions for what prescription they should receive.

Fewer than 5% of doctors felt it was helpful.

Major technology firms such as Apple and Samsung are investing heavily in tech that can monitor a user's health.

The survey of 330 UK physicians - 300 of them GPs - was carried out by Cello Health Insight, a medical market research firm.

"Doctors have witnessed an explosion in the quantity and quality of information now available to them and their patients via digital media and technology," said Dan Brilot, the company's digital director.

"Consumers are increasingly seeking out information (and technological tools such as fitness and health apps) to provide as much information as possible before - and after - consultation."

 

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 What's The Big Data? McKinsey Updates Estimates of Big Data Potential Value

 What's The Big Data? McKinsey Updates Estimates of Big Data Potential Value | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

We estimated the potential for big data and analytics to create value in five specific domains. Revisiting them today shows uneven progress and a great deal of that value still on the table (exhibit). The greatest advances have occurred in location-based services and in US retail, both areas with competitors…

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Effective Social Media Campaigns for Health - @giasison

Effective Social Media Campaigns for Health - @giasison | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Nowadays, the interest in using social media for public health campaigns seems to be growing, however there is a challenge in online engagement which may result to behavior change. 

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The Role of Color in Branding #Infographic

The Role of Color in Branding #Infographic | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
The color of your logo will determine how it is perceived.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, Esposito Christelle
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Stimulife Health's curator insight, December 11, 2016 4:10 PM
Thanks - Try our Stimulife Coffee www.stimulifecoffee.com
2DiFore Marketing Solutions's curator insight, December 12, 2016 8:20 AM

It's all about the color! What does the color RED make you think of? How about the color PURPLE? Looking to change up your brand in 2017 check out this blog post.

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Internet-based Medical Education

Presentation at the Association of Philippine Medical Colleges National Convention 5 Feb 2016 San Beda College, Manila
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"#MoiPatient je partage mon expérience et participe, avec d'autres qui, comme moi, souhaitent s'informer sur leur santé" par @Ciss_Officiel #hcsmeufr #esante

"#MoiPatient je partage mon expérience et participe, avec d'autres qui, comme moi, souhaitent s'informer sur leur santé" par @Ciss_Officiel #hcsmeufr #esante | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Le déploiement des ressources du numérique et des solutions digitales modifie considérablement le paysage de la prise en charge sanitaire, et plus globalement le rapport de l’individu à sa santé. C’est pourquoi le CISS a décidé d’éditer « Pour un patient acteur de la qualité de son parcours de santé. Le numérique en santé », note pour éclairer les droits et renforcer les capacités de l’ensemble des utilisateurs actuels et futurs de la e-santé tout au long de leur parcours de santé.

 


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Social media and health promotion

Social media is transforming the way we communicate, changing society (1), and health promotion with it. Social media tools such as Facebook (2), Twitter (3) and YouTube (4) reach more than a billion users across the globe through easy to use, low cost, multimedia and mobile technologies that create conversations between individuals and groups across the social spectrum. This new toolset offers a transformational means for information and communication technology (ICT) to support the original goals of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion (5) onward through the Bangkok Charter aimed at achieving health for all (6). A closer look at the opportunities and challenges that social media presents for health promotion requires going beyond technology toward a rethinking of the social relationships it helps to facilitate.

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