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Social Media Communities Help Redefine Health Care -  Techtonics

Social Media Communities Help Redefine Health Care -  Techtonics | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Social media health communities have been quietly reshaping healthcare as part of a growing trend to raise awareness and empower patients. Some medical professionals caution, however, that these websites might contain inaccurate or unsubstantiated information.

It is the next step in the evolution of social gatherings, but with wider reach. Instead of asking a friend or acquaintance to recommend a good doctor or explain how they are coping with disease, you can connect with a larger online community for all sorts of advice and health-related information.

“The Internet allows these conversations to expand beyond our typical geographic confines and connects us with like people faster than ever before,” said Colleen Young, Community Director at Mayo Clinic Connect. The Mayo Clinic was one of the early adopters of social media channels to further health-related discussion.

Engaging with others in a user community has clear benefits that help patients get more out of their professional health encounters, said Professor Eivor Oborn of Britain’s University of Warwick in an email. Oborn recently did research on the benefits of social media health communities.

There are numerous social health communities, such as Mayo Clinic Connect, Health Unlocked and Mumsnet, to name a few. They all have different purposes, functions, and corresponding limitations. Some are frequented by doctors who answer questions and offer advice. Others are patient-based information exchanges.

 

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From Foucault to Freire Through Facebook. Toward an Integrated Theory of mHealth

Objective. To document the integration of social science theory in literature on mHealth (mobile health) and consider opportunities for integration of classic theory, health communication theory, and social networking to generate a relevant theory for mHealth program design. Method. A secondary review of research syntheses and meta-analyses published between 2005 and 2014 related to mHealth, using the AMSTAR (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) methodology for assessment of the quality of each review. High-quality articles from those reviews using a randomized controlled design and integrating social science theory in program design, implementation, or evaluation were reviewed. Results. There were 1,749 articles among the 170 reviews with a high AMSTAR score (≥30). Only 13 were published from 2005 to 2014, used a randomized controlled design and made explicit mention of theory in any aspect of their mHealth program. All 13 included theoretical perspectives focused on psychological and/or psychosocial theories and constructs. Conclusions. There is a very limited use of social science theory in mHealth despite demonstrated benefits in doing so. We propose an integrated theory of mHealth that incorporates classic theory, health communication theory, and social networking to guide development and evaluation of mHealth programs.
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Mining Twitter to Assess the Public Perception of the “Internet of Things”

Mining Twitter to Assess the Public Perception of the “Internet of Things” | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Social media analysis has shown tremendous potential to understand public's opinion on a wide variety of topics. In this paper, we have mined Twitter to understand the public's perception of the Internet of Things (IoT). We first generated the discussion trends of the IoT from multiple Twitter data sources and validated these trends with Google Trends. We then performed sentiment analysis to gain insights of the public’s attitude towards the IoT. As anticipated, our analysis indicates that the public's perception of the IoT is predominantly positive. Further, through topic modeling, we learned that public tweets discussing the IoT were often focused on business and technology. However, the public has great concerns about privacy and security issues toward the IoT based on the frequent appearance of related terms. Nevertheless, no unexpected perceptions were identified through our analysis. Our analysis was challenged by the limited fraction of tweets relevant to our study. Also, the user demographics of Twitter users may not be strongly representative of the population of the general public.
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How Do You Regulate the Digital Health Revolution?

How Do You Regulate the Digital Health Revolution? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The rules that guide health apps and activity trackers are a work in progress.

The ads, which played on the radio, in television commercials on channels from HGTV to CNN and inGoogle searches, were pervasive and seductive. The copy varied, but the message was always the same: brain games were the antidote for a range of cognitive issues, from garden-variety memory loss, to ADHD to Alzheimer’s.

“No matter why you want a better brain, Lumosity.com can help,” a man reassures, via voiceover, in one ad. “It’s like a personal trainer for your brain, improving your performance with the science of neuroplasticity, but in a way that just feels like games.”

 

 

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L'IoT santé, un nouvel espace à s'approprier 

L'IoT santé, un nouvel espace à s'approprier  | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Le taux de pénétration des objets connectés ne cesse de croître. Mais pour séduire au-delà des consommateurs, les patients, ces objets doivent démontrer leur valeur d’usage au quotidien. Dans les domaines de la santé, des usagers témoignent qu’il y a bien un « avant » et un « après » l’acquisition de l’objet.

De l’intérêt à l’adoptionAu SIdO 2016 à Lyon, les 6 et 7 avril derniers, le patron de la société Sen.se et pionnier des objets connectés dans le monde, Rafi Haadjian, a raconté comment des objets de bien-être tels les montres et bracelets connectés, surtout dédiés au fitness, ont commencé à envahir les cours des collèges pour cette « attitude cool » et « à la mode » qu’ils donnent au collégien. 85 % des Français pensent ainsi que les objets connectés ne sont pas juste un phénomène de mode (OpinionWay, mars 2016). Mieux : pour 61% d’entre eux ces objets vont devenir incontournables, tout comme hier Internet ou les téléphones portables (sociovision, décembre 2015).

 

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Apple Scores GlaxoSmithKline Study in Key Test of Health Apps

Apple Scores GlaxoSmithKline Study in Key Test of Health Apps | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

GlaxoSmithKline Plc has started a rheumatoid arthritis study using Apple Inc.’s ResearchKit, marking the first time a drugmaker has used the health system for the iPhone to conduct clinical research.

Glaxo wants to record the mobility of 300 participants over three months and will also ask the patients to input both physical and emotional symptoms, such as pain and mood. The app Glaxo created from ResearchKit comes with a guided wrist exercise that uses the phone’s sensors to record motion, giving the drugmaker a standardized measurement across all users. The company will use the results to help design better clinical trials.

The success of the study could help determine the pharmaceutical industry’s future appetite for using Apple’s products to conduct research. Drugmakers have to balance the lower costs of using the app with their ability to gather accurate, reliable data. Risks include that test subjects will tire of entering information into the app, and, given the iPhone’s $399 starting price, the sample may be skewed toward wealthier demographics.

 

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10 Must-Add Nonprofits on Snapchat

10 Must-Add Nonprofits on Snapchat | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
It’s not easy to tell a good Snapchat story, but the nonprofits listed below are making a concerted effort to pioneer Snapchat storytelling. Doing so requires a willingness to experiment beyond traditional social media marketing and an understanding that there is no immediate payoff in terms of fundraising. In time,Snapcash may be used for fundraising, but for now it’s all about being an early adopter. Is your nonprofit considering experimenting with Snapchat? Here’s how to get started – then add and study the Snapchatters below and learn from their snaps.

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10 Must-Add Nonprofits on Snapchat
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Healthcare Social Media

Healthcare Social Media | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The effect Social Media has had on our society is nothing short of amazing. It is incredible how in less than a decade social networks have changed the way we develop relationships, look for information and communicate in general. With that being said, social media is also changing the way people manage their healthcare. Healthcare consumers are increasingly using social media as a platform to connect with their healthcare providers, look for information and make decisions about their health. Many are even sharing their healthcare experiences online to their followers turning social networks into an important channel for health-plan member communications.

As we shift from the ‘sick care’ model to one based on prevention and wellness, more and more importance is being placed on patient engagement and accessibility to accurate health information. Beyond marketing use, healthcare policy specialists believe social media could play an important role in reducing costs for public and private insurance plans by promoting healthy lifestyle choices. Many believe social media has the potential to be an efficient way of enhancing provider-patient communications,  encouraging appropriate utilization of care and encouraging compliance with care regulations.

For example, ClinicalTrials.gov lists 121 studies on the use of social media to address a wide range of health issues including early childhood care, depression, smoking cessation and predisposition to genetic disease.

Social media is also being examined as a method of facilitating communications among providers in coordinated care environments, as well as a way to evaluate levels of patient satisfaction. Social media has proven to be a great tool for providers and other industry members to communicate and engage with patients outside the clinical setting. The adoption of social media by health care companies is growing. According to a 2014 study in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, nearly 95 % of hospitals had a Facebook page and just over 50% had a Twitter account.

Whether through Facebook, Twitter, or other platforms, today’s providers are using social media to spread information on a wide range of topics from wait times in the ER to new clinical offerings and research discoveries. With such a wide range of information available, health care consumers can personalize their social media experience to include a mix of news sources most applicable to them and “follow” almost anyone in the healthcare industry from physicians and clinics to health plans.

I am not saying that social media does not come with any faults. On the contrary, there are still risks and challenges to take into consideration. For example, it can be difficult to control the quality of information shared on patients’ social accounts, creating concern about the circulation of faulty information. Social media posts and comments are not usually checked for accuracy and the sharing of false medical information on a large scale is something we need to consider with caution.

Additionally, in our heavily regulated industry, there are many privacy and security concerns about sharing health information online. Although dependable sites take precautions to protect the privacy and security of user information, in today’s world where hackers and cybercrimes are common, privacy can never be fully assured. It is for this reason that threats to the security of patient data shared through social media should be taken very seriously.

There is no denying the benefits that social media has in supporting patient engagement, establishing health communities online and facilitating effective communication between patients, physicians and academics. As consumers begin to rely more on social media to help them choose providers, manage their own health and determine treatment alternatives, it will be interesting to see what the future holds. The more we know about how social media can be used to effectively support patient-centered care initiatives — the more we can improve both individual and public health outcomes.


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Smart Machines Can Diagnose Medical Conditions Better Than Human Doctors

Smart Machines Can Diagnose Medical Conditions Better Than Human Doctors | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Until now, medicine has been a prestigious and often extremely lucrative career choice. But with intelligent machines now used to diagnose diseases, in the near future, will we need as many doctors as we have now? Are we going to see significant medical unemployment in the coming decade?

 

Robot doc vs human doc image from Shutterstock

Ross Crawford is a professor of orthopaedic research, Anjali Jaiprakash is a post-doctoral research fellow of medical robotics and Jonathan Roberts is a professor in robotics at the Queensland University of Technology

Dr Saxon Smith, president of the Australian Medical Association NSW branch, said in a report late last year that the most common concerns he hears from doctors-in-training and medical students are, “what is the future of medicine?” and “will I have a job?”. The answers, he said, continue to elude him.

As Australian, British and American universities continue to graduate increasing numbers of medical students, the obvious question is where will these new doctors work in the future? Will there be an expanded role for medical professionals due to our ageing populations? Or is pressure to reduce costs while improving outcomes likely to force the adoption of new technology, which will then likely erode the number of roles currently performed by doctors?

 

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How to Sell Kids on Vegetables - NYTimes.com

How to Sell Kids on Vegetables - NYTimes.com | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The same marketing techniques used to convince children to eat junk food are highly effective in promoting fruits and vegetables, a new study has found.

Researchers assigned 10 elementary schools to one of four groups. In the first, they posted vinyl banners around the salad bar depicting cartoon vegetable characters with “super powers.” In the second, they showed television cartoons of the characters. The third got both cartoons and banners, and a control group got no intervention. The study, in Pediatrics, went on for six weeks in 2013.

Compared to control schools, TV segments alone produced a statistically insignificant increase in vegetable consumption. But in schools decorated with the banners alone, 90.5 percent more students took vegetables. And where both the banners and the TV advertisements were used, the number of students taking vegetables increased by 239.2 percent.

“A lot of people have pushed back on this, saying marketing is evil,” said one of the authors, David R. Just, a professor of applied economics at Cornell. “But I have to disagree. It’s possible to use marketing techniques to do some good things.”

 

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Physician Social Communities and Treatment Adoption in Life Sciences

Physician Social Communities and Treatment Adoption in Life Sciences | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Life science companies are beginning to ascribe greater value to physician social network communities for their ability to expedite the adoption of new treatments. Momentum will build as life science companies find ways to be relevant to these communities without becoming unwelcome participants in physician interactions.

 

Physicians assess whether to adopt a treatment based on criteria that is often influenced by the experience of other physicians. These criteria frequently include:

  1. the benefits and risks of new treatments
  2. the level of dissatisfaction with current treatments
  3. condition severity and the impact a new treatment can have on patient lives
  4. the prevalence of new treatment candidates among their patients
  5. treatment costs and provider hurdles
  6. adherence and compliance challenges

Because physician decision making is so dependent on learning and experience; social media provides a great opportunity for these types of exchanges. As a treatment enters the market and gains broader exposure, physicians look to cohorts or peers who have already tried the treatment. In principle, physician social communities accelerate the pace of exposure to valuable insights for early, middle and late adopters.

Successful social environments must provide the granularity of information, scale and authenticity; each cohort of physicians must feel confident when considering a new treatment option. But, granularity, scale and authenticity are challenging. They demand community building strategies tailored to the unique needs of physicians. They also require that life science companies avoid covert promotion. Even the perception of hidden influence in a community, no matter how well intentioned, can damage it.

The principles of effective community building among physicians are not yet clear:

  • A 2011 study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research indicated physicians strongly prefer “gated communities” that restrict access to peers. But, who is a peer? When Pfizer physicians joined Sermo many practicing physicians were turned off.
  • Digitas Health has reported that almost twice as many physicians want to use peer-to-peer networks than actually do. This gap points to accessibility and design limitations in current peer-to-peer networking options.
  • Social networks revolve around power users who generate the most content. But, the busiest practicing clinicians have fewer incentives to be socially active than academics.

Nuvasive, a medical device company increased adoption of a new minimally invasive technology by launching a private forum to train surgeons on Syndicom’s SpineConnect, a collaborative network of 1,600 spine surgeons. Peer-to-peer training took the form of five to six fellows receiving training from an experienced surgeon. The success of Nuvasive points to learning as a path to drive adoption and overcome these challenges. Syndicom sponsored research reported a 30% improvement in adoption vs. traditional models.


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What if the web is almost over?

What if the web is almost over? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Nearly ten thousand researchers and no doubt thousands more students have quoted danah boyd and Nicole Ellison’s 2007 definition of social media:

We define social network sites as web-based services that allow individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system. The nature and nomenclature of these connections may vary from site to site.

It’s not actually a definition of social media, it’s a definition of social network sites, which is what we called sites like Facebook and Twitter in 2007. By 2008, people started calling them social media, and quickly adopted the definition of social network sites as a de facto definition of social media as well.

Notice, though, how that definition of social media in no way holds true for Snapchat. Snapchat is not a web-based service, individuals have no profiles, you can see which other users you follow, but not who anybody else follows, in fact, you can’t even see who follows you. You certainly can’t view and traverse other users lists of connections.

It’s as if Snapchat’s founders decided to try to create a social media that completely, in every way broke the most-cited definition of social media. Who knows, perhaps they did?

 

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The Liquid Self

Social media doesn’t need to be what it has come to be. Social media is young, growth comes with pains, and we should keep questioning assumptions and push this new media to new limits. My first post here on the Snapchat blog, fittingly, questioned the assumed permanence of social media content. Permanent content is just one option, a choice with far-ranging implications, and it isn’t necessary. Here, I’d like to think about one major consequence of permanence: the social media profile.

The familiar social media profile is that collection of information about you and/or created by you, usually with some other people you’re connected to. Profiles structure identity in more or less constraining ways: real name policies, lists of information about our preferences, detailed histories and current activities all comprise a highly structured set of boxes to squeeze oneself into. Further, as our documented histories grow, the profile grows both in literal size as well as in weight on our minds and behaviors.

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Industrie pharmaceutique : le Top 30 de l’innovation productive 2016

Industrie pharmaceutique : le Top 30 de l’innovation productive 2016 | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Pour la 4ème année consécutive, Johnson & Johnson arrive en tête du palmarès de l’indice d’innovation productive d’IDEA Pharma, classant les entreprises pharmaceutiques selon leur capacité à mettre au point et à commercialiser avec succès de nouveaux médicaments. Le japonais Takeda gagne 14 places pour se positionner au second rang, suivi du danois Novo Nordisk qui progresse de 15 places pour se situer en 3e position.
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Analysis of the effect of sentiment analysis on extracting adverse drug reactions from tweets and forum posts

Analysis of the effect of sentiment analysis on extracting adverse drug reactions from tweets and forum posts | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Objective

The abundance of text available in social media and health related forums along with the rich expression of public opinion have recently attracted the interest of the public health community to use these sources for pharmacovigilance. Based on the intuition that patients post about Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) expressing negative sentiments, we investigate the effect of sentiment analysis features in locating ADR mentions.

Methods

We enrich the feature space of a state-of-the-art ADR identification method with sentiment analysis features. Using a corpus of posts from the DailyStrength forum and tweets annotated for ADR and indication mentions, we evaluate the extent to which sentiment analysis features help in locating ADR mentions and distinguishing them from indication mentions.

Results

Evaluation results show that sentiment analysis features marginally improve ADRidentification in tweets and health related forum posts. Adding sentiment analysis features achieved a statistically significant F-measure increase from 72.14% to 73.22% in the Twitter part of an existing corpus using its original train/test split. Using stratified 10 × 10-fold cross-validation, statistically significant F-measure increases were shown in the DailyStrength part of the corpus, from 79.57% to 80.14%, and in the Twitter part of the corpus, from 66.91% to 69.16%. Moreover, sentiment analysis features are shown to reduce the number of ADRs being recognized as indications.

Conclusion

This study shows that adding sentiment analysis features can marginally improve the performance of even a state-of-the-art ADR identification method. This improvement can be of use to pharmacovigilance practice, due to the rapidly increasing popularity of social media and health forums.

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“Melanoma Detection” App Sellers Barred from Making Deceptive Health Claims | Federal Trade Commission

“Melanoma Detection” App Sellers Barred from Making Deceptive Health Claims | Federal Trade Commission | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The final defendant remaining in a Federal Trade Commission lawsuit challenging false or unsubstantiated claims for a set of purported “melanoma detection” apps is barred from making any further deceptive health claims about his products under a settlement with agency.

Avrom Lasarow has settled FTC charges in connection with the so-called “Mole Detective” family of apps. He and his company, L Health Ltd., allegedly advertised the apps online, where they sold in the Apple and Google app stores for up to $4.99.

“We haven’t found any scientific evidence that Mole Detective can accurately assess melanoma risk,” said Jessica Rich, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “If you’re concerned that a mole may be cancerous, please see a health professional.”

Lasarow and his company took over marketing the Mole Detective app in August 2012, after it was originally developed and marketed by Kristi Kimball and her company, New Consumer Solutions LLC, and added derivative apps like “Mole Detect Pro.”

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5 healthcare social media trends you'll notice this year.

5 healthcare social media trends you'll notice this year. | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

If you work in the healthcare industry, you know what a challenge it is to master social media for your brand.

What channels should you have an active presence on? Should you post photos, videos, links, custom visuals or a combination of them all? Should you post in the morning or afternoon? What clinical areas can you feature? How can you balance engaging content that’s relevant, useful and timely with content that’s strictly promotional?

As any healthcare marketer knows, the questions can seem never-ending—especially since it can seem like social media is always changing.

What changes can you start preparing for today… right now, even? Take a look at the five healthcare social media trends you’re sure to start noticing (that is, if you haven’t already).  

1. Search is starting on social media. When it comes to searching for information, user behavior is gradually changing. While using search engines is still the most common behavior (and probably always will be), some users are bypassing the practice and going straight to social instead. Their reasoning? Well, visual content, which tends to be more common on social, is a lot easier to scan than content that’s very text-heavy. And what’s more, many consumers also find this type of content to be more trustworthy. Combine these two thoughts, and it could be why we see users shifting their searching ever so slightly. Before they’re heading to Google for recipes, fitness routines and tips for managing diseases, they’re trying Pinterest. YouTube. Instagram. Maybe even Facebook. All of the platforms that lend themselves to large, visual content are starting to become more popular across the industry—and with good reason.

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Use of Social Media in Healthcare

This is a lecture delivered to first year medical students (and their research mentors) to encourage use of social media in medical education.To enhance communication between medical students and their mentors, we shall use platforms such as facebook, twitter and slideshare.
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Survey of Individual and Institutional Risk Associated with the Use of Social Media

Survey of Individual and Institutional Risk Associated with the Use of Social Media | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

ntroduction

Residents and faculty in emergency medicine (EM) residency programs might be unaware of the professional and legal risks associated with the use of social media (SM). The objective of this study was to identify and characterize the types and reported incidence of unprofessional SM behavior by EM residents, faculty, and nurses and the concomitant personal and institutional risks.

Methods

This multi-site study used an 18-question survey tool that was distributed electronically to the leaders of multiple EM residency programs, members of the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD), and the residents of 14 EM programs during the study period May to June 2013.

Results

We received 1,314 responses: 772 from residents and 542 from faculty. Both groups reported encountering high-risk-to-professionalism events (HRTPE) related to SM use by residents and non-resident providers (NRPs), i.e., faculty members and nurses. Residents reported posting of one of the following by a resident peer or nursing colleague: identifiable patient information (26%); or a radiograph, clinical picture or other image (52%). Residents reported posting of images of intoxicated colleagues (84%), inappropriate photographs (66%), and inappropriate posts (73%). Program directors (PDs) reported posting one of the following by NRPs and residents respectively: identifiable patient information (46% and 45%); a radiograph, clinical picture or other image (63% and 58%). PDs reported that NRPs and residents posted images of intoxicated colleagues (64% and 57%), inappropriate photographs (63% and 57%), or inappropriate posts (76% and 67%). The directors also reported that they were aware of or issued reprimands or terminations at least once a year (30% NRPs and 22% residents). Residents were more likely to post photos of their resident peers or nursing colleagues in an intoxicated state than were NRPs (p=0.0004). NRPs were more likely to post inappropriate content (p=0.04) and identifiable patient information (p=0.0004) than were residents.

Conclusion

EM residents and faculty members cause and encounter HRTPE frequently while using SM; these events present significant risks to the individuals responsible and their associated institution. Awareness of these risks should prompt responsible SM use and consideration of CORD’s Social Media Task Force recommendations.


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ClinicalTrials.gov lists 121 studies on the use of social media to address a wide range of health issues including early childhood care, depression, smoking cessation and predisposition to genetic ...

ClinicalTrials.gov lists 121 studies on the use of social media to address a wide range of health issues including early childhood care, depression, smoking cessation and predisposition to genetic ... | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

ClinicalTrials.gov is a Web-based resource that provides patients, their family members, health care professionals, researchers, and the public with easy access to information on publicly and privately supported clinical studies on a wide range of diseases and conditions. The Web site is maintained by theNational Library of Medicine (NLM) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Information on ClinicalTrials.gov is provided and updated by the sponsor or principal investigator of the clinical study. Studies are generally submitted to the Web site (that is, registered) when they begin, and the information on the site is updated throughout the study. In some cases, results of the study are submitted after the study ends. This Web site and database of clinical studies is commonly referred to as a "registry andresults database."

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Pharma’s digital health ambitions: Where are the opportunities and what’s hindering progress?

Pharma’s digital health ambitions: Where are the opportunities and what’s hindering progress? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

A panel discussion on the future of digital health in pharma at the MedCity CONVERGE conference in Philadelphia this week highlighted how Pfizer, Eli Lilly and Roche are using telemedicine, mobile health and connected devices as part of their drug development strategy. They also called attention to the impact of compliance on implementing these technologies.

Dennis Hancock, vice president of global connected solutions with Pfizer, noted that it built 140 clinician and patient-facing apps last year. He said the big pharma’s digital strategy revolves around three things. He emphasized that any digital health tools it enlists needs to be useful and fill an important gap. It also needs to be something that is easily used and engages with patients and it needs to be connected.

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Why Dieters Flock to Instagram - NYTimes.com

Why Dieters Flock to Instagram - NYTimes.com | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Su Instagram, devoti di una dieta chiamata la Whole30 hanno condiviso più di un milione di colorate immagini senza glutine, senza zucchero, pasti alcol-libero e senza latte e derivati, e l'immagine occasionale di persone in mostra i loro corpi dopo 30 giorni di restrizioni dietetiche.

I commenti sono pesanti sui punti esclamativi!

"Ritornare macinare insalata oggi per il pranzo!"

"Davvero entusiasta di cena !!!"

"Stai schiacciando questo !!"

Per 30 giorni la scorsa estate, di fronte a un programma di lavoro impegnativo e privo di energia, mi sono unito al gregge.

Mi sono avvicinato al Whole30 come un reset nutrizionale, e la # Whole30 hashtag era un luogo dove ho potuto ottenere idee per fare attraverso il mese senza nemmeno un singolo pacchetto di Splenda per il mio caffè. Le regole per il pentimento per i miei peccati dietetiche erano semplici:

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Wearable Fitness Devices Attract More Than The Young And Healthy

Wearable Fitness Devices Attract More Than The Young And Healthy | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

That Fitbit isn’t just for the young, active and healthy anymore.

Aging baby boomers and seniors are emerging as an equally prosperous market for fitness wearables manufacturers and the wellness industry as older Americans take to health technology and devices as rapidly as young people, according to new analyses.

“This preconceived notion that all things technology scare older people isn’t true,” Dr. Kaveh Safavi , senior managing director of Accenture’s health practice. “Whether it’s use of an app or devices, they are willing to use them.”

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Ephemerality and Social Media Bibliography - Cyborgology

Ephemerality and Social Media Bibliography - Cyborgology | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
This is a bibliography on the topic of ephemerality and social media maintained by Jenny Davis and Nathan Jurgenson. We are interested in papers  that directly explore new technologies that specifically afford ephemerality. These technologies, epitomized in the self-destructing content in apps like Snapchat, Tinder, and the iPhone camera, sit in partial juxtaposition to the “stickiness” of traditional new media. Our focus here is on work from the social sciences and the humanities. We consider both articles and substantial blogs and essays. We’d love suggestions for pieces to be included, comment with them below or write nathanjurgenson [at] gmail
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Why Snapchat is Valuable: It’s All About Attention -  Danah Boyd | apophenia »

Why Snapchat is Valuable: It’s All About Attention -  Danah Boyd | apophenia » | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Most people who encounter a link to this post will never read beyond this paragraph. Heck, most people who encountered a link to this post didn’t click on the link to begin with. They simply saw the headline, took note that someone over 30 thinks that maybe Snapchat is important, and moved onto the next item in their Facebook/Twitter/RSS/you-name-it stream of media. And even if they did read it, I’ll never know it because they won’t comment or retweet or favorite this in any way.

We’ve all gotten used to wading in streams of social media content. Open up Instagram or Secret on your phone and you’ll flick on through the posts in your stream, looking for a piece of content that’ll catch your eye. Maybe you don’t even bother looking at the raw stream on Twitter. You don’t have to because countless curatorial services like digg are available to tell you what was most important in your network. Facebook doesn’t even bother letting you see your raw stream; their algorithms determine what you get access to in the first place (unless, of course, someone pays to make sure their friends see their content).

Snapchat offers a different proposition. Everyone gets hung up on how the disappearance of images may (or may not) afford a new kind of privacy. Adults fret about how teens might be using this affordance to share inappropriate (read: sexy) pictures, projecting their own bad habits onto youth. But this is isn’t what makes Snapchat utterly intriguing. What makes Snapchat matter has to do with how it treats attention.

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