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#eHealthPromotion : verso la salute "Patient included"

Le nuove frontiere della comunicazione sociale. http://ht.ly/u400K ;
Giuseppe Fattori's insight:

Come comunicare il sociale nella società digitale? Nell’ultimo decennio, le campagne sociali di associazioni non profit e pubbliche amministrazioni su temi come la salute, la solidarietà, l’ambiente, sono molto cresciute in quantità e qualità.
Nonostante questo si tratta di una dimensione “marginale” nel panorama mediatico e si avverte il bisogno di acquisire nuove competenze per un uso efficace e innovativo degli attuali mezzi di comunicazione, considerando le ridotte risorse economiche a disposizione dei soggetti promotori. http://ht.ly/u40va 

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AllJoyn: A Common Language For Internet Of Things - InformationWeek

AllJoyn: A Common Language For Internet Of Things - InformationWeek | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Open-source lingua franca aims to let IoT devices and services communicate across manufacturers and operating systems.

Via Pierre Levy
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The Expanding Web of Clinical Trial Patient Recruitment

The Expanding Web of Clinical Trial Patient Recruitment | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

It is a poorly kept secret in the world of clinical trials that issues with patient recruitment and enrollment are the primary causes for missing clinical trial timelines.  Most of us have seen the data. We know that for each day a company goes beyond the planned deadline for a clinical trial, that company could be losing as much as $600,000 in foregone sales of smaller products and as much as $8 million on blockbuster drugs. As necessity is the mother of invention, it comes as no surprise that sponsors and CROs are looking to any and all means by which to increase the rate of patient enrollment. - See more at: http://www.isrreports.com/free-resources/expanding-web-clinical-trial-patient-recruitment/#sthash.0CQPxWA2.dpuf

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Neelie Kroes: mHealth will reduce costly visits to hospitals

Mobile health apps that measure your blood pressure or remind you to take your medication could save the EU 99 billion euros in healthcare costs by 2017, acc...

Via Emmanuel Capitaine , dbtmobile, Bart Collet, Celine Sportisse
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eHealth and innovation in women's and children's health: A baseline review

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Doctors who tweet aren't ones who bill Medicare for millions

Doctors who tweet aren't ones who bill Medicare for millions | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
There was an inverse association between Twitter followers and money received from Medicare.
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e-santé : la prévention dans tous ses états | Orange Business Services

e-santé : la prévention dans tous ses états | Orange Business Services | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
On a récemment parlé prévention dans un article qui s’intéressait à l’initiative de la mutuelle Discovery en Afrique du Sud, et bien on s’y remet mais cette fois ci on va faire un peu plus de théorie.
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La parola che cura con gli hashtag

La parola che cura con gli hashtag | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it


Qando si scrive digital health google ci riversa addosso device, app, stampanti 3D, billion dollars di investimenti.

Ma la digital health può essere anche una parola collettiva che cura.

Tra il 18 e il 21 marzo, in meno di 48 ore, la charity inglese Cancer Reasearch UK raccoglie più di 2 milioni di sterline di donazioni associate alla campagna #nomakeupselfie che dilaga su twitter e facebook. Già il 19 la BBC segnala quello che sta accadendo.


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Twitter is your new migraine doctor!

Twitter is your new migraine doctor! | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Deciphering 21,741 tweets, researchers have found that 74% women shared a real-time migraine attack on twitter, followed by 17% men.


The higher global peak of migraine tweets occurred Mondays at 14:00 GMT or 10 a.m. Eastern Daylight Saving Time, the study said.


It indicates a growing trend toward the cathartic sharing of physical pain as well as emotional pain on social media.


"As technology and language evolve, so does the way we share our suffering. It is the first known study to show the instant and broad impact of migraine attacks on modern patients' lives by decoding manually each one of their individual attack-related tweets," explained Alexandre DaSilva, an assistant professor at University of Michigan's school of dentistry.


During the study, DaSilva's team eliminated advertising, metaphor and nonrelated migraine tweets.


Further, they analysed the meaning of each individual migraine tweet.


"We sought to evaluate the instant expression of actual self-reported migraine attacks in social media," DaSilva noted.


The US accounted for 58% of migraine tweets followed by Europe at 20%.

Roughly 44% of tweets reported that migraine attacks immediately impacted mood.


The most common migraine descriptors were "worst" at nearly 15% and "massive" at 8%.


Results generated unique information about who suffers from migraines and what, how, where and when they use social media to describe their pain.


Read at: http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/report-twitter-is-your-new-migraine-doctor-1975095


Via Parag Vora, Plus91
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Ginny Dillon's curator insight, April 6, 11:53 AM

Are we trusting in Social Media more to share our health related conditions??

 

"There's a growing trend of cathartic sharing of physical pain as well as emotional pain on social media."

 

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To tweet or not to tweet: Social media for physicians

To tweet or not to tweet:  Social media for physicians | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Nepal? I don’t know anyone in Nepal. Yet not long ago I received a courteous email from a physician there, asking my permission to translate an article of mine into Nepali. The topic: advice for older patients who need anesthesia. He wants to distribute it to patients and publish it in his local newspaper.

I asked how he came across the article. He was browsing online among anesthesia blogs, and found mine, “A Penned Point“. Now “blog” isn’t a word Jane Austen would have recognized. It is a lumpish merger of “web” and “log”, and is generally defined today as a website on which an individual records opinions. The proliferation of blogs–like Tribbles–may be seen as a pernicious trend, but it demonstrates the power and reach of the Internet. Business Insider estimates that 22% of the people in the world own smartphones, an increase of 1.3 billion smartphones since 2009. In social media, once you put content out, you have no idea how far it will travel.

Many physicians consider social media a frivolous waste of time. Certainly they can be horribly misused–think of the cyber-bullying that goes on among teenagers. But used wisely, social media can be valuable communication tools. Here follows a brief guide to social media for physicians, admittedly subjective, with caveats included.

The doctor with an opinion

We all have opinions. Occasionally, we want the world to know about them. If you want to publish an opinion column and don’t want to create your own blog, there are online sites where your submission may be welcome. Probably the best-known public site for medical topics is KevinMD, which is curated by Dr. Kevin Pho, a New Hampshire internist. He came early to the game, starting his blog in 2004, and now has over 1000 regular contributors, myself included. You can submit a 500-700 word piece on almost any topic within medicine, aimed at an audience of physicians or at the general public. There’s a good chance that if you can put together a coherent sentence, Kevin will find a place for it. Brace yourself for the comments: Kevin’s readers tend to hold opinions as strongly as the writers do.

If you think the public is entitled to your opinion but haven’t much time, then Twitter is the place for you if you can contain yourself to 140 characters. For the novice tweeter, the shorthand on Twitter can be daunting. If you want to make sure I see your tweet, send it to me personally @KarenSibertMD. But if you want your tweet to contribute to a topic under general discussion, master the use of hashtags. #SOTU will take you to all the comments on President Obama’s State of the Union address (see also #Obamacare). A lively Twitter crowd spent the second half of the 2014 Super Bowl waiting for the commercial about the Clydesdale horses and the puppy (#BestBuds). A quick check of #anesthesia just now directed me to posts on the hazards of fluid overload, a patient’s question about epidurals, and heated debate about independent nursing practice at VA hospitals. Check Twitter to follow news and magazine sources for interesting stories you might otherwise miss.

There are excellent individual physician blogs. “Skeptical Scalpel” is the product of a veteran surgeon and former department chair who remains anonymous; his posts often critique recent developments in medicine and medical education, but are always pithy and hit their target. “Wachter’s World” features the enlightening ruminations of Robert Wachter MD, who first coined the term “hospitalist”. For the primary care physician’s perspective, you can’t top “In My Humble Opinion“, the work of Jordan Grumet MD. And don’t miss the comments of Shirie Leng MD, a former nurse who became a physician anesthesiologist, on her blog, “medicine for real“.

Professional online networks

LinkedIn is the best-known professional network. It’s easy to connect with colleagues inside and outside of medicine. You can join in online discussions among groups of your choice–the ASA, your state component society, and your college and medical school alumni associations, for instance. LinkedIn is a good way to follow developments and trends beyond your hospital’s walls, particularly in the business world. The LinkedIn tablet app is more visually appealing and easier to navigate than the website.

For connections within medicine, Doximity–a social network exclusively for physicians–is clearly on the ascendant. VentureBeat reported in January that Doximity’s network doubled in size last year to 250,000 members, more than the American Medical Association, and now reaches 35% of all physicians in the US. You can locate colleagues and former classmates across the country, and post your own profile and resume. The DocNews feature provides a digest of articles in the mainstream media as well as in in major medical journals. You can earn and track CME credits. Doximity will even give you your own electronic fax number, free. The app needs work, though; right now the website has better functionality.

Sermo also is a physician-only website, and is trying to reinvent itself by emphasizing its function as a curbside-consult resource. But Sermo’s big mistake early on was allowing its members to create posts and write comments under pseudonyms. This, and a lack of filtering, gave rise to a level of vituperative, profanity-laced, and highly politicized commentary that drove away many readers. Occasionally, Sermo will offer to pay $15 for a new post on an anesthesiology topic–$30 if yours is judged the best of the day.

Connecting with patients

Telemedicine may not have the bright future in anesthesiology that it does in other specialties like dermatology and radiology. There’s no such thing as a virtual intubation. But patients are always on the lookout for online information. And one of the “meaningful use” objectives for electronic health records is to engage patients and families in two-way communication. So it behooves us to look for other ways that we can interact with patients online, responsibly. Many physicians already exchange secure email routinely with their patients.

The Institute of Medicine recently surveyed social networking sites, and concluded that as of December, 67% of American adults with Internet access used some form of social media, and 59% used the Internet to look for health-related information. Patients use a number of sites that allow them to connect with other people who have similar health conditions, such as “PatientsLikeMe” for chronic conditions or “TheBody” for HIV. Perhaps the most surprising finding is that patients are willing to share their personal health data to help improve care:

—92% of social media users agree with sharing their health data to help research

—84% would be willing to share information with drug companies to help them make safer products

—94% agree with sharing their health data to help patients like themselves.

The IOM concluded that social media change the traditional relationship between researcher and patient. They now must work together as peers, the IOM declared, predicting that data sharing will become the standard in the delivery of care for everyone.

If you’re willing to spend time online answering patients’ questions for free, HealthTap will welcome you as one of its physician experts. Questions are limited to 150 characters, and answers to 400 characters. Many of the questions about anesthesiology fall into one of four categories:

1.  Fears about having anesthesia

2.  Postoperative problems: memory loss after general anesthesia; back pain after epidural analgesia for labor

3.  Questions about anesthesia and underlying diseases: asthma, heart disease

4.  Questions about narcotics and pain management.

It’s important for us to answer patients’ questions about anesthesia rather than leave the task to other physicians who may not answer accurately. For example, one physician advised an asthmatic patient that general anesthesia wouldn’t be safe, and I was able to set the record straight by emphasizing preoperative control of asthma symptoms. If we don’t participate, patients may glean information from biased or misinformed web sources.

Finally, Facebook

Facebook is for friends, not patients. Post pictures of your dog, or snow on your patio furniture. Post links to interesting articles you’ve enjoyed. Certainly no physician would be well advised to combine personal and business communication together on Facebook. At least set up a separate professional Facebook page that is completely different from your personal account, and don’t make the mistake of posting personal information on the professional page. Photos of your fabulous vacation should be posted only on your personal page (if at all), and only after you get home–don’t forget that thieves have been known to check Facebook to find out when you’re gone.

The Internet and social media can be powerful allies, but it’s best to remember that there is no real privacy online. Look at anything you post online, or even in a “private” email, as a postcard. Though most people won’t bother to read it, anyone anywhere could.



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We've got a handy checklist for live tweeting from events. Have you? - Evidently Cochrane

We've got a handy checklist for live tweeting from events. Have you? - Evidently Cochrane | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Experience the benefits of live tweeting with our handy checklist to help you.
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Improving Health Through Research | Academy Of Medical Science

Improving Health Through Research | Academy Of Medical Science | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Academy of medical science
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5 Ways Physicians Can Integrate Social Media with Existing Marketing

5 Ways Physicians Can Integrate Social Media with Existing Marketing | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it


By now you know how important social media marketing is for your practice. Beyond simply driving traffic to your website, you should also know by now that Facebook can be used to collect Big Data and narrow down your audience to most effective segment. But, if you’ve already been running a healthcare marketing campaign how do you go about integrating something as complicated as social media into your running strategies? Let the pro’s at Quaintise walk you through it.

1. Twitter for Patient Q&A

Instead of utilizing Twitter as just another avenue for content promotion and linking it to autopost from your Facebook Page, consider adding Twitter as a communication tool between your physicians, staff and patients. Consider creating a Twitter account strictly for improving the patient experience and increasing transparency and availability.

 

2. Email with Social Media

Many of the healthcare companies and practices that we get involved with here at Quaintise have some sort of newsletter or email system set in place already. The key is utilizing that system to it’s highest possible potential. For example, are you including direct links to your social media accounts? Are you integrating the same conversations your audience is having on your social media accounts with your newsletter and emails? Do you have social sharing buttons within your newsletter?

Most importantly, are you utilizing all of those emails within Facebook Custom Audiences to increase Likes and Engagement, and retargeting those patients with advertising?

 

3. Google+

Everything done online should have an aspect of Search Engine Marketing attached. With that said, Google+, while not the most popular social media network by far, can still be a wonderful tool for SEO. Don’t forget about how important Google products and services are for increasing your Google rankings. They like it when you use their stuff! If you’re currently running a campaign or full marketing strategy, consider tossing some targeted links onto Google+.

 

4. Hashtags

Yes, people still use hashtags. This can be easily integrated into the current campaign you’re running. Come up with a great, unique hashtag that your patients and Fans can use across all social mediums – a hashtag that is directly related to your current campaign.

 

5. Advertising

Facebook Advertising might be one of the most cost-effective forms of advertising you ever decide to use. With ads that can potentially run at under $0.50 per click, any campaign that you have running can easily be integrated into Facebook Advertising.

 

There is no limit to what you can do with social media marketing, even if you’ve already begun a healthcare marketing campaign. Give the experts at Quaintise a call for more information.


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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José Manuel Taboada's curator insight, April 11, 3:44 AM

Google +, aunque no es la red social más popular, con mucho, todavía puede ser una herramienta maravillosa para el SEO.

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Big Data is the new Artificial Intelligence

Big Data is the new Artificial Intelligence | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

This is the first of a couple columns about a growing trend in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and how it is likely to be integrated in our culture. Computerworld ran an interesting overview article on the subject yesterday that got me thinking not only about where this technology is going but how it is likely to affect us not just as a people. but as individuals. How is AI likely to affect me? The answer is scary.

Robert X. Cringely, 16/04/2014


Via Pierre Tran, Pierre Levy
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Pierre Tran's curator insight, Today, 12:56 AM

L'intelligence artificielle, telle que conçue dans les années 80 à base d'algorithmes et de puissance informatique, a échoué. Aujourd'hui, les ordinateurs se nourrissent de big data et apprennent par eux-mêmes.

Ceux qui prédisent le futur ont tendance à surestimer le changement à court terme et à sous-estimer celui à long terme. 

Pierre Tran's curator insight, Today, 12:58 AM

L'intelligence artificielle, telle que conçue dans les années 80 à base d'algorithmes et de puissance informatique, a échoué. Aujourd'hui, les ordinateurs se nourrissent de big data et apprennent par eux-mêmes.

Ceux qui prédisent le futur ont tendance à surestimer le changement à court terme et à sous-estimer celui à long terme. 

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What Will Happen to ‘#BigData’ In Education? | #learning #analytics

What Will Happen to ‘#BigData’ In Education? | #learning #analytics | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Privacy concerns have put the breaks on many efforts to use "big data" in education. Why are people so skittish of education data when other kinds of digital information are readily accessible?

Via Claude Emond, Pierre Levy, luiy
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luiy's curator insight, April 15, 7:50 PM

InBloom’s trajectory has shined a spotlight on the public’s sensitivity around what happens to student data. When it first began as a mammoth ed-tech project in 2011 by the Council of Chief State School Officers, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation called the Shared Learning Infrastructure, the purpose was to provide open-source software to safely organize, pool, and store student data from multiple states and multiple sources in the cloud. That included everything from demographics to attendance to discipline to grades to the detailed, moment-by-moment, data produced by learning analytics programs like Dreambox and Khan Academy. An API — application programming interface — would allow software developers to connect to that data, creating applications that could, at least in theory, be used by any school in the infrastructure.

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How the ePatient Will Revolutionize Pharma Marketing

How the ePatient Will Revolutionize Pharma Marketing | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Pharma companies need marketing strategies that will successfully engage the e-patient in order to continue branding and growing their products.
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JAMA - In Search of a Few Good Apps

JAMA - In Search of a Few Good Apps | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

mHealth apps are mobile device applications intended to improve health outcomes, deliver health care services, or enable health research.1 The number of apps has increased substantially, and more than 40 000 health, fitness, and medical apps currently are available on the market.2 Because apps can be used to inexpensively promote wellness and manage chronic diseases, their appeal has increased with health reform and the increasing focus on value. The bewildering diversity of apps available has made it difficult for clinicians and the public to discern which apps are the safest or most effective.


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PatientView's curator insight, April 12, 12:42 PM
We are one of those organisations that publish app reviews (but by patient groups/consumer groups)
You advocate certification but we have made a policy of not kitemarking apps
There is a distinct difference of being a simple gather of information (journalism and publishing) and one that acts as a regulator
I do not think publishers should act as regulators
However I do think patient experiences in bulk, if properly analysed, could add to the evidence base 
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Social Networking Sites and the Continuously Learning Health System: A Survey

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A Doctor's Prescription for Social Media - Part 2

As an experiment, I immersed myself in social media for the past 3 months. Social media has changed the way that I think about and practice medicine
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Capitalism simply isn't working and here are the reasons why

Capitalism simply isn't working and here are the reasons why | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Will Hutton: Economist Thomas Piketty's message is bleak: the gap between rich and poor threatens to destroy us
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Slideshare: The Digital Future of Healthcare

Slides to accompany my keynote speech given at the leadership summit of a leading European pharmaceuticals company. March 2014.

Via Ash Rishi
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Le Lab Marketing Digital's curator insight, Today, 4:57 AM


  • The Internet of the body
  • The Internet of babies
  • The Internet of aging
  • Quantified Self
  • ...
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Social Media Frequency: How Often to Post to Facebook, Twitter

Social Media Frequency: How Often to Post to Facebook, Twitter | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
If guessing is required for finding the optimal frequency, then at least we can be making educated guesses. Here's our research on the ideal amount to post.

Via Official AndreasCY, John van den Brink, Martin (Marty) Smith
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Official AndreasCY's curator insight, April 13, 7:22 AM

How often should you post on social media?

Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, April 13, 9:28 AM

Frequency is not as important as WHAT you post, but helpful study here. This post shares how often Buffer submits to each social media network. Marty

Taylon Chandler's curator insight, April 16, 5:37 PM

Such good information!

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Harnessing the Power of the Digital Patient in the Clinical Development Process

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Why Social Is the New SEO

Why Social Is the New SEO | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
In January of this year, Matt Cutts released a video explaining that social signals do not impact search engine result rankings. For a long time, every SEO

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Neil Ferree's curator insight, April 12, 11:53 AM

As we move forward in the new SEO era of social, the takeaway is this stay active on your social networks. Pay attention to them, curate them, improve them, enhance them, and remain plugged into this valuable resource.

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Can Twitter save lives?

Can Twitter save lives? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
It seems to me the most compelling reason NHS Wales staff are on Twitter is the potential for actually saving lives.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Facebook Frustration | Symbiartic, Scientific American Blog Network

Facebook Frustration | Symbiartic, Scientific American Blog Network | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
I wasn’t an early adopter of Facebook. I couldn’t possibly have been less interested, but a friend asked that I join so we could keep in ...
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