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What Do Patients Tweet About Their Mammography Experience?

Rationale and Objective

The purpose of this study was to evaluate themes related to patients' experience in undergoing mammography, as expressed on Twitter.

Methods

A total of 464 tweets from July to December 2015 containing the hashtag #mammogram and relating to a patient's experience in undergoing mammography were reviewed.

Results

Of the tweets, 45.5% occurred before the mammogram compared to 49.6% that occurred afterward (remainder of tweets indeterminate). However, in patients undergoing their first mammogram, 32.8% occurred before the examination, whereas in those undergoing follow-up mammogram, 53.0% occurred before the examination. Identified themes included breast compression (24.4%), advising other patients to undergo screening (23.9%), recognition of the health importance of the examination (18.8%), the act of waiting (10.1%), relief regarding results (9.7%), reflection that the examination was not that bad (9.1%), generalized apprehension regarding the examination (8.2%), interactions with staff (8.0%), the gown (5.0%), examination costs or access (3.4%), offering or reaching out for online support from other patients (3.2%), perception of screening as a sign of aging (2.4%), and the waiting room or waiting room amenities (1.3%). Of the tweets, 31.9% contained humor, of which 56.1% related to compression. Themes that were more common in patients undergoing their first, rather than follow-up, mammogram included breast compression (16.4% vs 9.1%, respectively) and that the test was not that bad (26.2% vs 7.6%, respectively).

Conclusion

Online social media provides a platform for women to share their experiences and reactions in undergoing mammography, including humor, positive reflections, and encouragement of others to undergo the examination. Social media thus warrants further evaluation as a potential tool to help foster greater adherence to screening guidelines.

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The old and the new: vaccine hesitancy in the era of the Web 2.0. Challenges and opportunities

The phenomenon known as vaccine hesitancy (a term that includes the concepts of indecision, uncertainty, delay and reluctance) is complex, closely linked to social contexts, and has different determinants: historical period, geographical area, political situation, complacency, convenience and confidence in vaccines. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that vaccine hesitancy and any proxy of it should be constantly monitored. Given the growing importance and pervasiveness of information and communication technologies (ICTs), the new media could be exploited in order to track lay-people's perceptions of vaccination in real time, thereby enabling health-care workers to actively engage citizens and to plan ad hoc communication strategies. Analysis of so-called "sentiments" expressed through the new media (such as Twitter) and the real-time tracking of web-related activities enabled by Google Trends, combined with the administration of specific online "surveys" on well-defined themes to target groups (such as health-care workers), could constitute a "Fast data monitoring system" that yields a snapshot of perceptions of vaccination in a given place and at a specific time. This type of dashboard could be a strategic tool that enables public services to organize targeted communication actions aimed at containing vaccine hesitancy.
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Apple Wants You to Hand Over Health Data Collected on Your Device to Your Doctor

Apple Wants You to Hand Over Health Data Collected on Your Device to Your Doctor | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

So far Apple Inc.’s HealthKit has mostly collected fitness data from its devices. In the future, if the company gets its way, the software will interpret that information, turning it into advice for users, doctors and others.

Scores of health-care experts hired by Apple in recent years are building improved electronic health record software that can better analyze and understand the implications of patient data, according to people familiar with the team’s plans.

The iPhone maker is also working on new apps for the Apple Watch. One helps users track sleep patterns, one of the people said. Another app gauges fitness levels by measuring the time taken for the heart rate to fall from its peak to resting level, according to one of the other people. Apple already has an app that measures heart rate, but doesn’t interpret that data.

 


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Could Amazon’s Echo be a digital care agent for chronic patients?

Could Amazon’s Echo be a digital care agent for chronic patients? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Amazon Echo’s Alexa, the cloud-based personal assistant, senses chronically ill patient Bob, 75, enter the room.

Alexa: Good morning, Bob. It’s time for you take your 10 mg of Coumadin.

Bob: Thank you, Alexa.

If the above scenario sounds a little far fetched – how in the world can Amazon’s Echo device sense a person’s presence as well as know to say which medication to to take and how much – it’s time to put a little faith in the internet of things.

“That technology exists now and it’s a matter of time before Amazon decides to creates a version of the device that either interfaces with another sensor device that is a motion sensor or has a motion sensor built in,” said Nathan Treloar, president and chief operating officer at Orbita, a software company that builds digital services for home health and is based in Boston, Massachusetts.

 

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Healthcare guide to Social Media Marketing

The Healthcare Industry Can No Longer Ignore Social Media As the healthcare industry continues to constantly change, it is extremely important that healthcare …

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Taking your first steps in digital health (or, here’s the best way to eat an elephant)

Taking your first steps in digital health (or, here’s the best way to eat an elephant) | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

One thing you must do when looking to take on any digital health program is to determine which part you’re going to take on. I hear your question: You mean, there’s more than one type of digital health? The answer is yes — sort of.

There are really three main types of digital health technologies, although they all interact with each other to various degrees. They are patient engagement systems, consumer-driven technologies and physician-driven technologies. Let's compare and contrast them.

Patient engagement systems.

The patient engagement category is made up of technologies that can handle all of the routine things we do with our healthcare providers — things like making appointments, refilling prescriptions, scheduling mammograms, messaging our doctors and paying bills. These are the types of activities that might typically have started with a phone call in the past. It's the transactional stuff that (if done right) can and should become invisible to the patient.

By using many of the advances in consumer engagement technology, we can make the activity of doing business with healthcare providers as seamless as possible.

 

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Digital health intervention doesn't reduce heart attack risk

Digital health intervention doesn't reduce heart attack risk | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

In the recently published SAHARA study, researchers found that a digital health intervention using messaging targeted at lifestyle modification failed to reduce heart attack risk among South Asian adults.

While tremendous progress has been made in treatment of coronary artery disease, it’s now well recognized that we’ve fallen short in primary prevention. When working with a patient, primary prevention starts with understanding their risk. In the US, recent guidelines gave us a new risk estimator that the American College of Cardiology packaged into the ASCVD Risk Estimator app. Once you understand their risk, then comes the intervention focused on modifiable risk factors.

tack risk.

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A ReThink of the Way we Drink

This video is a collaboration between Dr. Mike Evans and a research team led by Dr. Katharine Bradley of Group Health, a Seattle-based, consumer-governed non-profit health system. http://www.ghc.org/

Dr. Mike Evans is a staff physician at St. Michael's Hospital and an Associate Professor of Family Medicine. He is a Scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and has an endowed Chair in Patient Engagement and Childhood Nutrition at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Bradley, a Group Health general internist and senior investigator at Group Health Research Institute, is a leading researcher in alcohol and health. Her work includes studies funded by the U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality aimed at improving primary care for patients with unhealthy drinking.
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Top 5 Ways Social Media is Used by Healthcare Professionals

Top 5 Ways Social Media is Used by Healthcare Professionals | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Social media has become widely used by individuals and businesses to stay connected, communicate and even market products or services. As these sites evolve and become a prevalent way of reaching out to consumers, healthcare professionals are finding new, effective ways to utilize social media.

Social Media and Healthcare

Many healthcare managers are working to effectively utilize social media to engage patients and consumers. Through effective marketing and communication tactics, organizations are able to move away from traditional advertising techniques, and use the internet to connect with consumers in the healthcare field. Consumers heavily rely on information found online and use the internet to gather healthcare information and connect with other patients to garner support and learn about similar conditions. Others utilize these resources for research or to share experiences with healthcare providers and other related organizations. Patients also have a tendency to seek information via social media that assists in the selection of doctors, specialists and hospitals to make informed decisions on the best practices to seek care. Individuals will use social media to post reviews or other comments that support or possibly deter others from choosing that type of healthcare in the future. It is essential for providers to be active on social media and provide accurate information, connect with readers and implement marketing techniques where applicable.

 


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A Systematic Assessment of Smartphone Tools for Suicide Prevention

A Systematic Assessment of Smartphone Tools for Suicide Prevention | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Background Suicide is a leading cause of death globally, and there has been a rapid growth in the use of new technologies such as mobile health applications (apps) to help identify and support those at risk. However, it is not known whether these apps are evidence-based, or indeed contain potentially harmful content. This review examines the concordance of features in publicly available apps with current scientific evidence of effective suicide prevention strategies. Methods Apps referring to suicide or deliberate self-harm (DSH) were identified on the Android and iOS app stores. Systematic review methodology was employed to screen and review app content. App features were labelled using a coding scheme that reflected the broad range of evidence-based medical and population-based suicide prevention interventions. Best-practice for suicide prevention was based upon a World Health Organization report and supplemented by other reviews of the literature. Results One hundred and twenty-three apps referring to suicide were identified and downloaded for full review, 49 of which were found to contain at least one interactive suicide prevention feature. Most apps focused on obtaining support from friends and family (n = 27) and safety planning (n = 14). Of the different suicide prevention strategies contained within the apps, the strongest evidence in the literature was found for facilitating access to crisis support (n = 13). All reviewed apps contained at least one strategy that was broadly consistent with the evidence base or best-practice guidelines. Apps tended to focus on a single suicide prevention strategy (mean = 1.1), although safety plan apps provided the opportunity to provide a greater number of techniques (mean = 3.9). Potentially harmful content, such as listing lethal access to means or encouraging risky behaviour in a crisis, was also identified. Discussion Many suicide prevention apps are available, some of which provide elements of best practice, but none that provide comprehensive evidence-based support. Apps with potentially harmful content were also identified. Despite the number of apps available, and their varied purposes, there is a clear need to develop useful, pragmatic, and multifaceted mobile resources for this population. Clinicians should be wary in recommending apps, especially as potentially harmful content can be presented as helpful. Currently safety plan apps are the most comprehensive and evidence-informed, for example, “Safety Net” and “MoodTools—Depression Aid”.
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The Measles Vaccination Narrative in Twitter: A Quantitative Analysis

Background: The emergence of social media is providing an alternative avenue for information exchange and opinion formation on health-related issues. Collective discourse in such media leads to the formation of a complex narrative, conveying public views and perceptions.

Objective: This paper presents a study of Twitter narrative regarding vaccination in the aftermath of the 2015 measles outbreak, both in terms of its cyber and physical characteristics. We aimed to contribute to the analysis of the data, as well as presenting a quantitative interdisciplinary approach to analyze such open-source data in the context of health narratives.

Methods: We collected 669,136 tweets referring to vaccination from February 1 to March 9, 2015. These tweets were analyzed to identify key terms, connections among such terms, retweet patterns, the structure of the narrative, and connections to the geographical space.

Results: The data analysis captures the anatomy of the themes and relations that make up the discussion about vaccination in Twitter. The results highlight the higher impact of stories contributed by news organizations compared to direct tweets by health organizations in communicating health-related information. They also capture the structure of the antivaccination narrative and its terms of reference. Analysis also revealed the relationship between community engagement in Twitter and state policies regarding child vaccination. Residents of Vermont and Oregon, the two states with the highest rates of non-medical exemption from school-entry vaccines nationwide, are leading the social media discussion in terms of participation.

Conclusions: The interdisciplinary study of health-related debates in social media across the cyber-physical debate nexus leads to a greater understanding of public concerns, views, and responses to health-related issues. Further coalescing such capabilities shows promise towards advancing health communication, thus supporting the design of more effective strategies that take into account the complex and evolving public views of health issues.

 

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Embracing digital transformation in the Pharma and Healthcare sectors

Embracing digital transformation in the Pharma and Healthcare sectors | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Digital technology has increased the pace of change in consumer and patient expectations, but most pharma and healthcare organisations haven’t moved quickly in response.

Consumers are taking control over their own healthcare and driving change, preferring a more convenient way to get medical services and access information.

According to Deloitte Consulting, healthcare and pharma marketers spent just $1.4bn on digital ads, a figure that lags marketers in other industries.

One of the consequences of this digital underinvestment is that this has created opportunities for third parties to become the go-to resources for consumers and physicians looking for healthcare information online.

Our new Embracing Digital Transformation in the Pharma and Healthcare sectors reportlooks at the opportunities and challenges faced by organisations looking to respond to competition, and the changing needs of their customers and the approaches they are taking.   

The research is based on interviews with senior digital professionals across a range of pharmaceutical, biotech and consumer healthcare companies which included Alere Inc, Fermenta Biotech Limited, GSK Consumer Healthcare, MSD AP, Lenovo Health, Ogilvy Commonhealth Worldwide, Roche Products Limited and Takeda Pharmaceuticals. 

It was also supplemented with data from our own research looking at digital trends for 2016 and beyond, along with third party research.   

For more insight, Econsultancy subscribers can download the full report, but here are several key trends and insights emerging from the study. 

 

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The Measles Vaccination Narrative in Twitter: A Quantitative Analysis

The Measles Vaccination Narrative in Twitter: A Quantitative Analysis | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Background: The emergence of social media is providing an alternative avenue for information exchange and opinion formation on health-related issues. Collective discourse in such media leads to the formation of a complex narrative, conveying public views and perceptions.

Objective: This paper presents a study of Twitter narrative regarding vaccination in the aftermath of the 2015 measles outbreak, both in terms of its cyber and physical characteristics. We aimed to contribute to the analysis of the data, as well as presenting a quantitative interdisciplinary approach to analyze such open-source data in the context of health narratives.

Methods: We collected 669,136 tweets referring to vaccination from February 1 to March 9, 2015. These tweets were analyzed to identify key terms, connections among such terms, retweet patterns, the structure of the narrative, and connections to the geographical space.

Results: The data analysis captures the anatomy of the themes and relations that make up the discussion about vaccination in Twitter. The results highlight the higher impact of stories contributed by news organizations compared to direct tweets by health organizations in communicating health-related information. They also capture the structure of the antivaccination narrative and its terms of reference. Analysis also revealed the relationship between community engagement in Twitter and state policies regarding child vaccination. Residents of Vermont and Oregon, the two states with the highest rates of non-medical exemption from school-entry vaccines nationwide, are leading the social media discussion in terms of participation.

Conclusions: The interdisciplinary study of health-related debates in social media across the cyber-physical debate nexus leads to a greater understanding of public concerns, views, and responses to health-related issues. Further coalescing such capabilities shows promise towards advancing health communication, thus supporting the design of more effective strategies that take into account the complex and evolving public views of health issues.

.

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The importance of medical communications (IV): Improving health literacy

The importance of medical communications (IV): Improving health literacy | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Clear and timely medical communications isn’t only important when a medical crisis occurs. Long before we arrive at the critical stage of an event, having an effective system that uses customer insights and gets messages out to healthcare professionals (HCPs) and patients can help improve overall health care management. In addition to the physical factors that make the difference between a healthy and unhealthy person, there is a less measurable aspect: health literacy. This relates to how well ‘lay people’ understand matters of medicine and health, and applies to the level of literacy determined by social status, age, culture and more.

Doctors and HCPs can do only so much when it comes to the wellbeing of their patients. The rest is down to the patients themselves, and their level of health literacy determines how well they look after their bodies when doctors aren’t present. An ‘illiterate’ patient, therefore, is far more likely to fail to see warning signs, misunderstand advice and lead a lifestyle detrimental to their wellbeing. Lack of education is the biggest of all killers, and there’s no easy-to-swallow medicine that can cure that.

 


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Under value-based care, what is the ROI of telemedicine? “We just don’t know.”

Under value-based care, what is the ROI of telemedicine? “We just don’t know.” | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
A virtual visit can be just as real as one in a physician’s office, believes Thanh Nguyen, a family nurse practitioner with Providence Health eXpress in Oregon. But unlike a clinic visit whose economics is fairly well understood, the jury is still out on the return on investment of telemedicine.

While speaking at the recently-concluded American Association of Nurse Practitioners’ Specialty & Leadership conference last week in Rosemont, Illinios, Nguyen recalled how — during a session with an emotional patient — she found herself leaning over to hand the person a box of tissues before realizing they were not physically in the same room.

In addition to sharing her personal stories and giving tips on the importance of maintaining eye contact across cyberspace, Nguyen offered her assessment of the state of healthcare’s use of telemedicine tools and the role NPs can play in advancing their adoption.

Telehealth technology offers solutions to healthcare’s staffing and access challenges along with providing growth opportunities for nurse practitioners, according to Nguyen. But the economics behind it remain unclear and licensing requirements and other political controversies continue to cloud the picture.

Via Dominique Godefroy
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La plus belle promesse du numérique, c’est notre santé !

La plus belle promesse du numérique, c’est notre santé ! | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Qualité de la recherche, savoir-faire dans le domaine des objets connectés, riches bases de données de la Sécurité sociale,etc. : autant de qualités du système de santé français qui pourraient permettre la transition vers la E-santé. Mais le conservatisme et la prudence des politiques restent un handicap.


Via Rémy TESTON, Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz, Philippe Marchal
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Apple HealthKit reportedly to shift from tracking to diagnosis

Apple HealthKit reportedly to shift from tracking to diagnosis | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Apple plans to turn HealthKit app bundle into a full-fledged diagnostic tool that interprets fitness and health data in order to offer medical advice, Bloomberg reported Monday.

The tech giant has recruited a team of health care experts over the past few years who are busy beavering away to build an electronic record system that will be able to analyze data for both doctors and patients, the news service reported, citing "people familiar with team's plans."

Apple introduced HealthKit software in 2014 and, right from the start, made data gathered from wearables a central part of the accompanying Health app's job.

 

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Study hints that wearable fitness trackers do more harm than good

Study hints that wearable fitness trackers do more harm than good | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

If you’ve been wearing a fitness tracker for a while and have been disappointed in the results you’ve received, you’re not alone. A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association indicates that fitness trackers could be impeding your ability to meet your weight loss goals.

The study, which took place between 2010 and 2014, included 471 randomized participants (74.5% completed the study) which were separated into two main groups. One group manually documented their physical activity at the end of the day while the other one wore automatic activity trackers which did the documentation for them.

Participants that completed the study participated for a period of two years, initially being put on a low-calorie diet and encouraged by the researchers at the University of Pittsburgh’s Physical Activity and Weight Management Center  to maintain an active lifestyle.

The results of the study were surprising. The group that used electronic fitness trackers to automatically log their activities lost less weight than the group that logged their activity manually.

 

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Apple brings in star YouTube doctor to work on digital health

Apple brings in star YouTube doctor to work on digital health | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Since Apple treats its works-in-progress as state secrets, those of us on the outside are left to speculate on what the tech company might be up to, including in healthcare. Sometimes, we get some clues and are left to fill in the blanks.

This week brought a pretty interesting clue.

Apple, of Cupertino, California, has hired Canadian digital health guru Dr. Mike Evans for an unspecified role in worldwide health innovation.

Evans is founder of the Health Design Lab at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. He also runs his own multimedia project, the Evans Health Lab, which “build[s] engaging health media to make the world a better, healthier place,” according to the lab’s website.

 

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5 approaches for using technology to communicate with physicians

5 approaches for using technology to communicate with physicians | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

As technology continues to weave its way into healthcare, more and more patients are using their smartphones and wearable devices to communicate with their doctors, according to a new study.

More than 58 percent of Americans have shared information with a medical professional through their smartphone, a mobile app or wearable device. One in four have emailed or texted a photo of a medical issue to a physician.

The study, released yesterday by communications firm Ketchum, surveyed 2,000 Americans that own a smartphone.

The survey revealed that many patients are managing their own health from smartphones and fitness trackers. Nearly 50 percent of survey respondents have an app that tracks fitness, exercise, health or medications, and 83 percent use these apps at least once a week.

"This study points to a shift in people's attitudes and readiness to use technology to manage their health," said Lisa Sullivan, executive vice president and North American technology practice leader for Ketchum, in a statement. "With U.S. smartphone adoption at 68 percent, now is the time for businesses that have a stake in the healthcare industry to push to develop approachable, intuitive mobile tech offerings that help the ever-increasing mobile user population improve something as personal and important as their health."

The researchers broke down the survey results and categorized respondents into five user profiles based on how much they used technology to keep track of their health.

Discerning Digitals: The most active users who are constantly connected, but still like face-to-face contact with medical professionals.

Swayable Seekers: A group of users that only uses their smartphone to make phone calls. They like to access and manage their health online, but still feel like they have a lot to learn about using technology to its full potential.

Health Tech Hesitators: This group generally is not happy with their health and physical well-being, and is not comfortable sharing medical information online.

App-athetic Agnostics: People that love using technology but don’t use it to manage their health, and don’t have plans to within the next year.

Low-tech Lifers: Traditionalists who don’t believe using technology to manage their health with benefit them.

 
 
 

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Forget Mobile-Enabled Web - You Need an App for That + Video!

Forget Mobile-Enabled Web - You Need an App for That + Video! | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

When it comes to the amount of time Americans have their heads buried in their smartphones, increasingly they’re using apps rather than surfing the mobile web. According to its latest estimates of time spent with media, Americans are spending even more time in mobile apps than previously thought—driven by consumption of news and video, as well as use of productivity apps, social media and mobile messaging platforms.

 

This year, US adults will spend 1 hour and 54 minutes a day using apps on their smartphones, 7 minutes more than last year. In contrast, they’ll only surf the mobile web on their phones for 19 minutes a day, a decline of 2 minutes from last year. In other words, apps will account for 86% of adults’ nonvoice smartphone time this year, with the mobile web accounting for just 14%.

 

“Mobile apps are easily accessible and can be launched faster than the mobile web,” said eMarketer forecasting director Monica Peart. “Apps also provide an immersive experience with a greater degree of functionality, integrating with the device’s other apps and capabilities such as GPS, the camera and even the contact list. These elements keep users more engaged in each session, something that a mobile website cannot rival.”

 

In addition to productivity and news apps, video continues to be a key driver of mobile, specifically smartphone, usage. Video time on mobile devices overtook that on desktop last year. This year, video consumption on smartphones will exceed that on tablets. American adults will consume video on their smartphones for an average of 15 minutes a day. That figure will steadily increase through 2018, as video consumption on desktop declines slightly.


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What Does Apomediation Mean?  New Model of How we Find Health Information and Understand It

What Does Apomediation Mean?  New Model of How we Find Health Information and Understand It | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
What is Apomediation?

Apomediation is a term used to describe using a person who facilitates your pursuit of information on the Internet. You are assisted in getting and understanding the information, but you are not required to go to a gatekeeper to get the information.

The prefix apo comes from the Latin for "to stand by." Mediation comes from the Latin mediare to "be in the middle." Put together, it is someone who stands by your side rather than someone who is standing between you and something as anintermediary would.

 

Disintermediation is the term used for cutting out this middleman. Apomediation provides an expert who helps you when you directly access information.

Medicine 2.0 and Health 2.0 are terms used to describe the fact that everyone, professionals, and patients alike can share information on the Internet about health and medical information. Apomediation describes the fact that when you access information on the Internet, you cut out the gatekeepers or any middlemen, which before would have included your own doctor or an insurance salesman. You would have had to go to them to get medical information.

Now, apomediation allows you to go directly to the source of information, even if it is not a (previously considered) "expert" source. The expert presenting the information "stands by" you. The information may come from a professional, or it may come from someone considered to be more of a peer.

 

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Health warning over blood pressure monitoring apps as doctors warn they are 'untested, inaccurate and potentially dangerous' 

Health warning over blood pressure monitoring apps as doctors warn they are 'untested, inaccurate and potentially dangerous'  | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
  • Researchers analysed the top 107 apps for 'hypertension'
  • Found three quarters offering tracking capabilities
  • Doctors warn apps that use a camera to analyse bloodflow are 'bogus' 

Millions of people could be trying to measure their blood pressure with untested, inaccurate and potentially dangerous smartphone applications, or apps, a new study has claimed.

Researchers analysed the top 107 apps for 'hypertension' and 'high blood pressure' that are available for download on the Google Play store and Apple iTunes and found that nearly three-quarters offered tools for tracking medical data.

But they also found seven Android apps that claimed users needed only to press their fingers onto phone screens or cameras to get blood-pressure readings – claims that scientists say are bogus.

@MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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Bruno Demay's curator insight, September 18, 2:50 AM

The health apps must be certified, validated to be recommended by physicians and used by patients : it's a key condition for Mhealth.

Pharma Guy's curator insight, September 19, 2:11 PM

Also read: "Study Finds Popular mHealth Blood Pressure App is Inaccurate"; http://sco.lt/4s7ESv 

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Guidelines for Safe Use of Social Media in Healthcare

Guidelines for Safe Use of Social Media in Healthcare | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

In a recent survey, co-sponsored by the Health Care Compliance Association, “social media” emerged as the No. 1 risk concern among respondents in healthcare.

In truth, patient information can and does end up on Facebook and on other Internet sites. In reviewing cases published in major media and by the federal government, the culprits are often those working within healthcare.


Consider a 2015 report published in the Journal of Nursing Regulation:

In a 2014 survey, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) revealed that 48% of responding Boards of Nursing (33 in number) face challenges with social media. Several boards in the survey reported images of wounds or procedures being shared across social media after being photographed on mobile phones.

 


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