#eHealthPromotion...
Follow
Find
17.5K views | +0 today
#eHealthPromotion, #web2salute
E-Health promotion. #web2salute. Health 2.0,
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Social network e sani stili di vita - Citizens included

Social network e sani stili di vita. Citizens included - Associazione Italiana Comunicazione Pubblica e Istituzionale 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Digitized Health
Scoop.it!

video / The Future of Digital Health – Keynote Speech by Monty Metzger

video / The Future of Digital Health – Keynote Speech by Monty Metzger | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
At the Vital Signs Conference in Denmark Monty C. M.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Doctors Hub
Scoop.it!

L'iPad : source de réactions allergiques chez les enfants !

L'iPad : source de réactions allergiques chez les enfants ! | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Le cas d'un enfant âgé de 11 ans a confirmé les risques d'allergie pour les personnes les plus sensibles disposant d'une tablette de type iPad d'Apple.

Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

SKIN CANCER - Twitter: an opportunity for public health campaigns -The Lancet

SKIN CANCER - Twitter: an opportunity for public health campaigns -The Lancet | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Because of Twitter's broad reach, especially among young adults, health advocates should consider increasing the use of Twitter and other online platforms to communicate public health and cancer prevention messages. Research is needed to explore ways to direct health messages to social network users who discuss and search for risk behaviours online. Combining the expertise of skin cancer and health communication researchers, public health advocates, and social media experts might be necessary to develop the effective cancer prevention campaigns.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Dermatology on Instagram:The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic.

Dermatology on Instagram:The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic. | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic.  This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Instagram.  The most popular professional dermatological organizations, dermatology journals, and dermatology related patient advocate groups on Facebook and Twitter, determined from a prior study, were searched for established profiles on Instagram.  In addition, dermatology-related terms (i.e. dermatology, dermatologist, alopecia, eczema, melanoma, psoriasis, and skin cancer) and dermatology-related hashtags (i.e. #dermatology, #dermatologist, #melanoma, #acne, #psoriasis, and #alopecia) were searched.  None of the top ten dermatological journals or professional dermatological organizations were found on Instagram.  Although only one of the top ten patient advocate groups related to dermatology conditions, Melanoma Research Foundation, had an Instagram presence, there were many private offices, cosmetic products, and some patient advocacy groups.  This novel social networking platform could grant dermatology journals and other professional organizations a unique opportunity to reach younger demographic populations, particularly women, with the potential for true educational and life-changing impact.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Scoop.it!

Big Data in Health Care: Using Analytics to Identify and Manage High-Risk and High-Cost Patients - CHCF.org

Big Data in Health Care: Using Analytics to Identify and Manage High-Risk and High-Cost Patients - CHCF.org | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Big Data in Health Care: Using Analytics to Identify and Manage High-Risk and High-Cost PatientsDavid W. Bates, Suchi Saria, Lucila Ohno-Machado, Anand Shah, and Gabriel Escobar

A Health Affairs article explores the value big data and clinical analytics could bring to health care, especially under payment reform.


Via Bernard Strée, dbtmobile
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Mobile Health’s Growing Pain Full of promise, mobile health still needs to wow patients and nail down its payoff.

Mobile Health’s Growing Pain Full of promise, mobile health still needs to wow patients and nail down its payoff. | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Among technologists, mobile health is thriving. Since the start of 2013, more than $750 million in venture capital has been invested in companies that do everything from turn your smartphone into a blood pressure gauge to snapping medical–quality images of the inner ear. Apple, Qualcomm, Microsoft, and other corporate giants are creating mobile health products and investing in startups. 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Can Mobile Technologies and Big Data Improve Health?

Can Mobile Technologies and Big Data Improve Health? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

After decades as a technological laggard, medicine has entered its data age. Mobile technologies, sensors, genome sequencing, and advances in analytic software now make it possible to capture vast amounts of information about our individual makeup and the environment around us. The sum of this information could transform medicine, turning a field aimed at treating the average patient into one that’s customized to each person while shifting more control and responsibility from doctors to patients.


The question is: can big data make health care better?


“There is a lot of data being gathered. That’s not enough,” says Ed Martin, interim director of the Information Services Unit at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. “It’s really about coming up with applications that make data actionable.”


The business opportunity in making sense of that data—potentially $300 billion to $450 billion a year, according to consultants McKinsey & Company—is driving well-established companies like Apple, Qualcomm, and IBM to invest in technologies from data-capturing smartphone apps to billion-dollar analytical systems. It’s feeding the rising enthusiasm for startups as well.


Venture capital firms like Greylock Partners and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, as well as the corporate venture funds of Google, Samsung, Merck, and others, have invested more than $3 billion in health-care information technology since the beginning of 2013—a rapid acceleration from previous years, according to data from Mercom Capital Group. 


Via nrip
more...
Paul's curator insight, July 24, 12:06 PM

Yes - but bad data/analysis can harm it

Pedro Yiakoumi's curator insight, July 24, 1:48 PM

http://theinnovationenterprise.com/summits/big-data-boston-2014

Vigisys's curator insight, July 27, 4:34 AM

La collecte de données de santé tout azimut, même à l'échelle de big data, et l'analyse de grands sets de données est certainement utile pour formuler des hypothèses de départ qui guideront la recherche. Ou permettront d'optimiser certains processus pour une meilleure efficacité. Mais entre deux, une recherche raisonnée et humaine reste indispensable pour réaliser les "vraies" découvertes. De nombreuses études du passé (bien avant le big data) l'ont démontré...

Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Could health apps save your life? That depends on the FDA

Could health apps save your life? That depends on the FDA | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates everything from heart monitors to horse vaccines, will soon have its hands full with consumer health apps and devices.


The vast majority of the health apps you’ll find in Apple’s or Google’s app stores are harmless, like step counters and heart beat monitors. They’re non-clinical, non-actionable, and informational or motivational in nature.


But the next wave of biometric devices and apps might go further, measuring things like real-time blood pressure, blood glucose, and oxygen levels.

More clinical apps

The FDA is charged with keeping watch on the safety and efficacy of consumer health products. Lately, that includes more clinical apps as well as devices you might buy at the drugstore, like a home glucose testing kit.


“It’s these apps that the FDA says it will regulate,” David Bates of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Physicians Organization told VentureBeat in June. These apps will have to go through the full 510(k) process,” he said.


Dr. Bates chaired a group to advise the FDA on how to review health apps for approval, and on how the FDA should advise developers.

“It was intended to help them think through the risk factors involved with these products and then give guidance on how to stay within the guidelines,” he said.


“The device makers were asking from some guidance from The FDA on what types of things would be accepted and what wouldn’t,” Bates said.

Bates believes the FDA wants to use a light regulatory touch when looking at new medical devices. “The FDA definitely wants innovation to continue in clinical devices,” he said. “In general the FDA knows that the vast majority of apps are just informational.”


The FDA’s final guidance focuses on a small subset of mobile apps that present a greater risk to patients if they do not work as intended.


Health apps go mainstream

The big software companies (Apple, Google, and Samsung) have brought attention to, and lent credibility to, apps and devices that do more than count steps. These companies are building large cloud platforms designed to collect health data from all sorts of health apps and devices.


more at http://venturebeat.com/2014/07/21/health-apps-are-changing-so-must-the-fda/



Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Digital marketing pharma
Scoop.it!

FDA Guidance: How Can Pharma and Device Companies Use Twitter? Not Easily. | RAPS

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today released two guidance documents focused on the use of social media by members of regulated industry, including one on how companies can use the social media platform Twitter and other space-limited...
Via Olivier Delannoy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Santé et Hôpitaux "AutreMent"
Scoop.it!

Google s’associe à Novartis pour ses lentilles connectées

Google s’associe à Novartis pour ses lentilles connectées | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Le projet Google de lentilles connectées n’est plus vraiment un secret pour personne : nous vous avions déjà parlé de cette nouvelle technologie et des usages qui pouvaient en être faits.

Via L'Info Autrement
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

From promises to policies: is big pharma delivering on transparency?

As increasing numbers of pharmaceutical companies establish policies for granting third party access to their clinical trial data, the onus shifts to those ready to begin sifting through the data

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Social media Saturday: 8 tips to find time for social media

Social media Saturday: 8 tips to find time for social media | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
By far, the most common question I receive from doctors when I give social media presentations centers around the time involved. You want to be active on Twitter or Facebook or start a blog, but you see patients full time. You take call once a week. You have kids who play sports. Here are eight suggestions that have helped me carve out time to maintain the blog, podcast and more.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Informed consent and the ethics of the Facebook news feed study

Informed consent and the ethics of the Facebook news feed study | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Like many people, I have complicated and ambivalent feelings about my dependence on these technology giants.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Doctors Hub
Scoop.it!

Beyond the Buzz: Ten Tips for Healthcare Tweeters

Beyond the Buzz: Ten Tips for Healthcare Tweeters | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Twitter can be better managed by using some tools and techniques to tame it.  In today’s article I will share with you ten tips to engage effectively and get more out of the Twitter healthcare experience.


Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from The Rise of the Algorithmic Medium
Scoop.it!

Canadian court forces Google to remove search results worldwide, as fears of "memory hole" grow

Canadian court forces Google to remove search results worldwide, as fears of "memory hole" grow | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
A Canadian court is forcing Google to remove search listings not just for google.ca, but beyond the country’s borders too. The case could lead to more regional censorship practices becoming global.

Via Pierre Levy
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Twitter as a tool for ophthalmologists.Twitter is an underutilized resource in ophthalmology and has the potential to enhance professional collegiality, advocacy, and scientific research.

Abstract

Twitter is a social media web site created in 2006 that allows users to post Tweets, which are text-based messages containing up to 140 characters. It has grown exponentially in popularity; now more than 340 million Tweets are sent daily, and there are more than 140 million users. Twitter has become an important tool in medicine in a variety of contexts, allowing medical journals to engage their audiences, conference attendees to interact with one another in real time, and physicians to have the opportunity to interact with politicians, organizations, and the media in a manner that can be freely observed. There are also tremendous research opportunities since Twitter contains a database of public opinion that can be mined by keywords and hashtags. This article serves as an introduction to Twitter and surveys the peer-reviewed literature concerning its various uses and original studies. Opportunities for use in ophthalmology are outlined, and a recommended list of ophthalmology feeds on Twitter is presented. Overall, Twitter is an underutilized resource in ophthalmology and has the potential to enhance professional collegiality, advocacy, and scientific research.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

An Introduction to Evolutionary Site Redesign with WiderFunnel's Blog - WiderFunnel Marketing Conversion Optimization

An Introduction to Evolutionary Site Redesign with WiderFunnel's Blog - WiderFunnel Marketing Conversion Optimization | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
I’m pleased to share our new blog design with you today.

A few months ago, after neglecting our website design for several years, we concluded that we finally had to pay it some attention (!)

I'd like to share how we approached our own blog and website redesign. I'd also like to share our new approach to website redesign, called Evolutionary Site Redesign (ESR). I believe it represents the future of website design for companies that care about results.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

A Longitudinal Study of Follow Predictors on Twitter

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Santé 2.0
Scoop.it!

Survey: 75 percent of patients want digital health services | mobihealthnews

Survey: 75 percent of patients want digital health services | mobihealthnews | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

According to a survey of thousands of patients in Germany, Singapore, and the United Kingdom, the adoption of digital healthcare services remains low because existing services are either low quality or not meeting patients’ needs. The survey, conducted by consulting firm McKinsey, included responses from at least 1,000 patients in the three countries.

“Many healthcare executives believe that, due to the sensitive nature of medical care, patients don’t want to use digital services except in a few specific situations; decision makers often cite data that point to relatively low usage of digital healthcare services,” McKinsey analysts Stefan Biesdorf and Florian Niedermann wrote in a recent blog post. “In fact, the results of our survey reveal something quite different. The reason patients are slow to adopt digital healthcare is primarily because existing services don’t meet their needs or because they are of poor quality.” 

McKinsey found that more than 75 percent of respondents would like to use some kind of digital health service. Many are interested in “mundane” offerings, the firm wrote.

 

 


Via rob halkes, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, LA BLOUSE BLANCHE
more...
rob halkes's curator insight, July 16, 7:18 AM

Great Survey results, aligning with what experts already thought. Results generated by Germany, Singapore and the UK, but believed to be representative of patients in these advanced markets.


See my conclusions upon reading the report here

Honeywell HomMed's curator insight, July 25, 10:01 AM

With our LifeStream View, care providers can grant access to patient’s health information through the creation of patient portals, which can be configured for: Physicians, Care Providers and Families. Learn more: bit.ly/1lDmuiK

Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, July 25, 10:32 AM

Los resultados de una encuesta parecen derribar algunos mitos respecto de la "salud móvil" o m-health como "Esta tecnología solo la usan los jóvenes".

Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from 9- PHARMA MULTI-CHANNEL MARKETING by PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

88% of Biz Are Undergoing 'Digital Transformation,' Study Says

88% of Biz Are Undergoing 'Digital Transformation,' Study Says | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

A new report, The State of Digital Transformation, released today by Brian Solis of Altimeter Group, discusses the phenomenon of "digital transformation" a


Via Angel Gonzalez, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

How Smart Are Your Tweets?

How Smart Are Your Tweets? | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Thirty-three percent of tweets test at a fourth grade reading level, how do yours compare?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Bussines Improvement and Social media
Scoop.it!

#Twitter Is About to Improve Direct Messages #cmua

#Twitter Is About to Improve Direct Messages #cmua | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it
Twitter is about to make some obvious but much-needed improvements to its direct-messages feature. (Twitter is about to make some much-needed improvements to its direct-messages feature.

Via Virginia Gordon, Ricard Lloria
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Online Reputation: How Physicians Should Deal With Online Rating Websites

Online Reputation: How Physicians Should Deal With Online Rating Websites | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Physicians can ill-afford to ignore what patients are writing about them online. But the simple fact is – constantly monitoring rating and review websites can consume a lot of your already limited time and energy. Some physicians might be panicky that they will confront adverse comments about their practice and hence shun rating websites.

But experts suggest that physicians should be aware of the online ratings and reviews from patients to correct themselves. Continually ignoring rating websites can spell disaster in the long run. The more aware you are of what patients are writing about you, the more able you will be to improve your online reputation.

Surveys reveal that 50 percent of new patients point to online reviews and rating sites, such as Yelp and ZocDoc, as their referral sources. Thus, it is clear that online ratings and reviews are playing a bigger role in your ability to attract new patients.

Again, surveys reveal that 56 percent of patients considered online ratings as important when choosing a new doctor; and nearly 25 percent had actively sought out physician ratings when choosing their primary-care physicians.

Another survey, conducted by healthcare technology company Digital Assent in 2013, found that 72 percent of 341 respondents said that adverse reviews would forbid them from consulting a particular doctor.

Given the growing popularity of online ratings and reviews of physicians, it’s time doctors took a more active role in managing their online reputation. Make sure the first impression you give online is just as excellent as the one you may give in person.

Of course, there is a general complaint from the medical fraternity. They claim that these ratings are subjective and largely based on measures not directly in the doctor’s control! For instance, patients are asked to rate doctors on many nonclinical criteria such as waiting time, behavior of paramedical staff, rapport, and patient satisfaction.

Physicians will have to necessarily pay attention to rating sites as any low rating would mean patients will turn away. Web-based physician-rating sites are rapidly expanding in number and scope.

Web-based physician-rating sites should be seen as part of a paradigm shift in the relationship between physicians and patients. In the present era of consumerism, doctors are removed fro their high pedestal, and power has shifted to the hands of the patients



Via Plus91
more...
Janna Lusk's curator insight, July 18, 9:43 PM

Physicians are often wrapped up in the healthcare they provide, and thus, are less likely to know how to handle online ratings. An emotional reaction to public reviews is the kiss of death, but you can't ignore them, either.

 

Physicians, you are small business owners, just like anyone else. Educate yourselves in business, run a tight ship, and make sure every staff member is connected with the patients. Once the reviews are posted, thank each person for their feedback and for giving an honest opinion. That will earn more trust than anything.

Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

8 symptoms of a failing health care social media campaign

8 symptoms of a failing health care social media campaign | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Innovative health care marketing takes time, creativity, and dedication—and recognition of the potential missteps along the way.

If you aren’t evaluating your efforts and expanding or recalibrating your strategy, then time and money are being wasted. Nobody has time for that.

You don’t have to make these mistakes to learn from them:

1. Your page’s “likes” or followers are all purchased.

Buying followers is frowned upon in the social media world. It means you aren’t gaining attention organically. You might think that buying followers will improve your reach, but in reality they’ll have little impact.

2. Every post you share has two likes (or fewer) and rarely gets comments or responses.

Your goal shouldn’t be quantity but quality. If your Facebook page only has 100 followers but every post gets 15 “likes” and some comments, you’re in better shape than a page with 1,000 followers and zero engagement.

3. You’re not engaging with/responding to your online community.

Don’t post just to post. Rather, provide value to those in your community including other practices, hospitals, organizations, businesses, local media, and schools. Also, be sure to share their posts; they’ll recognize the gesture and return the favor.

4. There are not regular reviews coming in.

Is your Yelp page showing no reviews since 2012? You may have a link on your website and comment cards in your office, but happy patients haven’t taken the step to provide positive feedback. Encourage your staff to remind patients to take the cards with them when they leave so they have the links.

5. Analytics show significant traffic drops.

Decreases in your website traffic could indicate that one of your competitors is doing a better job at dominating the SEO scene. Consider looking into a revamped SEO plan and jump-starting the strategy with a PPC campaign.

6. Your content is all over the place without a clear strategy.

Post with a goal in mind. Consider your audience and make a plan for when and how you’ll try to engage with them. It will help you to better measure the success of your efforts and it also help you keep on track for posting.

7. Inconsistencies in branding/mission across other areas of marketing.

Marketing in health care is a broad term, encompassing physician relations, advertising, social media, email marketing, etc. Ensure that all your teams are on the same page with your efforts so your hard work can bring the best possible results.

8. Follower count is dropping or staying stagnant.

If your followers seem to be dropping like flies, you need to consider why they are no longer following your practice. Could you be posting too often with invaluable content? Ask yourself the hard questions, and come up with a plan for winning back your followers.



Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Media, SEO, Mobile, Digital Marketing
Scoop.it!

5 Things to Consider When Monitoring Your Brand on Twitter

5 Things to Consider When Monitoring Your Brand on Twitter | #eHealthPromotion, #web2salute | Scoop.it

Monitoring your brand on twitter? Here are some suggestions to integrate in your strategy and don't miss any mentions


Via Kamal Bennani
more...
No comment yet.