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Stephen Brookfield's website

Stephen Brookfield's website | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Download his "Discussion as a Way of Teaching" from "Workshop Materials" for great discussion starting ideas! And take a look at all the other workshop materials he makes available here.

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Web Resources for New Faculty
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Working alone 'together' can be good motivation - Futurity

Working alone 'together' can be good motivation - Futurity | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
The sense that you're not the only one tackling a challenge—even if you're physically alone—can increase motivation, say researchers.
Ann Johnson's insight:

More good evidence for value of team-based learning in the classroom, but this study also reinforces the value of faculty 'accountability groups' to nurture productivity.

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"She Didn’t Teach. We Had to Learn it Ourselves.” | Faculty Focus

"She Didn’t Teach. We Had to Learn it Ourselves.” | Faculty Focus | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

"Yesterday I got an email from a faculty member who had just received her spring semester student ratings .  .  . She’d gotten one of those blistering student comments. “This teacher should not be paid. We had to teach ourselves in this course."

Ann Johnson's insight:

Essential reading for anyone trying new active learning strategies, flipping, or team-based learning this semester. Be sure to read third paragraph from the bottom on the importance of managing student expectations.

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Tenure-Track Wisdom, Part 1

Tenure-Track Wisdom, Part 1 | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
The first in a series of interviews with faculty members about what they learned during their first year on the tenure track.
Ann Johnson's insight:

Great idea and good advice here.

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Four Key Questions about Grading

Four Key Questions about Grading | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Does grading provide feedback to help students understand and improve their deficiencies? The grade itself is feedback, but generally it is accompanied with faculty comments that justify the grade and offer suggestions for improvement. Most of us know the problem here, “The grade trumps the comment,” as one researcher cited says. Students tend not to read the comments; they look at the grade and get on with life.


Via Faculty Focus
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Playing with Teaching Words, Part 3: Active Learning

Playing with Teaching Words, Part 3: Active Learning | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
When I learned to teach… (Yeah, I know, insert eye rolling, if you must – but realizing I’ve wrapped 35 years of teaching, I should be able to use that phrasing at least once in a post, so…) When I...

Via Faculty Focus
Ann Johnson's insight:

Putting to rest the active-passive dichotomy in describing effective teaching. A reasoned approach to balancing 'participation' and 'acquisition' in the classroom.

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Examining Knowledge Beliefs to Motivate Student Learning

Examining Knowledge Beliefs to Motivate Student Learning | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
“I just cram for the exam and then forget everything.”

“If I can just get this last paper done I am in the clear.”

Comments like these make us cringe, but we all know the external factors that motivate students: grades, grades, grades. I spend a great amount of time providing students with concrete, detailed feedback on papers only to hear someone say, “Oh, I didn’t look at the feedback, just the grade.” From a faculty perspective, the grade is the least important. The joy of student engagement and learning drives our work. We ended up in higher education for a reason—most of us see great value in the learning process.
Ann Johnson's insight:

Good reminder of the need to assess student beliefs/assumptions as you shape their learning experiences.

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Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus

Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Earlier this year, a couple of contributions to The Teaching Professor (Haave 2014) and Faculty Focus (Weimer 2014) discussed the place of learning philosophies in our teaching. The online comments to Weimer’s blog post (2014) made me think more about how we as instructors need to be careful to bridge instructivist and constructivist teaching approaches for students not yet familiar with taking responsibility for their own learning (Venkatesh et al 2013).

Ann Johnson's insight:

Thinking toward your Third Year Review portfolio (or tenure file)? Here are some good ideas for crafting your teaching philosophy statement.

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Make sure your syllabus is well designed and accessible | Syllabus Ideas from Emory U website

Make sure your syllabus is well designed and accessible | Syllabus Ideas from Emory U website | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Ann Johnson's insight:

A  helpful guide for strong syllabus design.

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Mentoring Is a Business. Don’t Fear It.

Mentoring Is a Business. Don’t Fear It. | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Paying for mentorship, coaching, or editing might seem hard to stomach. But there’s a lot to be said for getting professional help from someone who used to be on the inside.
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20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day

20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day
Ann Johnson's insight:

 

"19. Use variety

20. Make it useful"

 

Great, simple strategies here. No clickers required.

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Eight Tips on Writing Efficiently while Overloaded with Teaching, Service and Kids

Eight Tips on Writing Efficiently while Overloaded with Teaching, Service and Kids | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

From a great blogging source on everything having to do with academic life:  "The Professor Is In."

Ann Johnson's insight:

Excellent, concise, pragmatic tips.

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Ann Johnson's curator insight, May 1, 8:19 AM

Excellent, concise, pragmatic tips.

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Class Discussion Challenge: Getting Students to Listen and Respond to Each Other's Comments

Class Discussion Challenge: Getting Students to Listen and Respond to Each Other's Comments | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Issue 1: The classroom discussion is going pretty well. Students are offering some good comments and more than one hand is in the air. Then a student makes a really excellent observation that opens up a whole avenue of relevant possibilities. You follow-up by calling on a student whose hand has been in the air for some time. Her comment is fine, but it’s totally unrelated to the previous comment. How do you get students to respond to each other’s comments? How do you get student comments to build on a key topic so that it becomes more like a real discussion?
Ann Johnson's insight:

Great tips here, and even more below in the reader comments.

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Experts explore plagiarism -- beyond the traditional definition

Experts explore plagiarism -- beyond the traditional definition | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

From Inside Higher Ed:  Smart ideas here on the need to work with students to help them understand and avoid unintentional plagiarism. Don't assume they already know what it is or how to find and use best resources.

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Learning to Let Go: Listening to Students in Discussion - Hybrid Pedagogy

Learning to Let Go: Listening to Students in Discussion - Hybrid Pedagogy | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
When a class involves discussion, we owe it to our students to not know what’s going to happen, lest we start dictating what we want them to think. To truly engage another in a conversation, we respond to the ideas that develop organically
Ann Johnson's insight:

Appreciated this observation: "I wasn’t actually letting students try things in our conversations. Instead, I expected them to say things, and I waited until they said what I expected. It was a farce, and I should have just told them what was on my mind and waited for them to ingest it, old-school style."

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5 Things You Can Do To Prepare For The New Semester – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

5 Things You Can Do To Prepare For The New Semester – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
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History will not repeat itself (i.e. lessons learned as a first-year faculty member)

History will not repeat itself (i.e. lessons learned as a first-year faculty member) | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
By Sarah Bisbing I survived my first year as a faculty member. In fact, I think I even did pretty well if I consider my student evals and the number of end-of-year hugs received. I’m going to pat m...
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Excellent advice for first year faculty from a veteran.

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The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard

The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Advantages of longhand over laptop note-taking in class -- recent research.

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Teaching & Learning - Helping Students More Accurately Assess Their Performance

Teaching & Learning - Helping Students More Accurately Assess Their Performance | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

"Learning, whether it’s learning content or learning about learning, is a student responsibility."

Ann Johnson's insight:

Great essay by Maryellen Weimer on the importance of addressing student over-confidence about their performance and their grades.

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Video series aims to help instructors help first-generation students @insidehighered

Video series aims to help instructors help first-generation students @insidehighered | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Faculty tips for teaching first generation students. Excellent summary and link to video resources.

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Sometimes 'Hand-Holding' Can Be a Good Thing

Sometimes 'Hand-Holding' Can Be a Good Thing | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

For first-generation and adult students, among others, a little extra help can make all the difference.

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Graphic Display of Student Learning Objectives – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Graphic Display of Student Learning Objectives – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Ann Johnson's insight:

Great ideas here: "Students can see—at a glance—that . . . none of [the] course assignments are random or arbitrary (an occasional student complaint), but that each assignment links directly to a course learning objective."

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A Caring Professor May Be Key in How a Graduate Thrives

A Caring Professor May Be Key in How a Graduate Thrives | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
The Gallup-Purdue Index seeks to measure graduates’ well-being and the college experiences that shape them. Its first report suggests that human factors matter most.
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Tips for Handling Student Excuses

Tips for Handling Student Excuses | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
As new teachers very quickly learn, students will come up with all kinds of excuses for missing assignments and other work. Students will never say, “I missed the exam because I was out late last night—it was one dollar taps at the Silver Horse, you know how it goes.” As a result, teachers must have with a policy for handling these situations, which invariably involves a decision on trust.
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What’s the Story on Learning Styles?

What’s the Story on Learning Styles? | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
We have this tendency in higher education to throw babies out with bath water. It derives from dualistic thinking. Either something is right or wrong, it’s in or out, up or down. As mature thinkers, we disavow these dichotomous perspectives, but then find their simplicity hard to resist. They make complicated things easy.

Via Faculty Focus
Ann Johnson's insight:

Helpful clarification of this sometimes-murky concept.

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The Art of Asking Questions

The Art of Asking Questions | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

A useful blog post by Maryellen Weimer.

Ann Johnson's insight:

UST faculty often report that they have difficulty getting students engaged in discussion. Half the battle is finding the right questions. I especially like Weimer's tip: keep track of those questions that work well and recycle them!

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