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Essay on mentoring and minority faculty members | by Kerry Ann Rockquemore

Essay on mentoring and minority faculty members | by Kerry Ann Rockquemore | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

This is good advice for all faculty members, but especially those from underrepresented groups.  Rockquemore provides a new model for seeking the mentoring help you will need as a new faculty member.

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Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus

Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, a couple of contributions to The Teaching Professor (Haave 2014) and Faculty Focus (Weimer 2014) discussed the place of learning philosophies in our teaching. The online comments to Weimer’s blog post (2014) made me think more about how we as instructors need to be careful to bridge instructivist and constructivist teaching approaches for students not yet familiar with taking responsibility for their own learning (Venkatesh et al 2013).
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What Are They Learning? And How?

What Are They Learning? And How? | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Here are three simple ways to get quality student feedback in your courses.
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Tips on assessing student knowledge in order to tailor class activity.

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Prompts to Help Students Reflect on How They Approach Learning

Prompts to Help Students Reflect on How They Approach Learning | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
One of the best gifts teachers can give students are the experiences that open their eyes to themselves as learners. Most students don’t think much about how they learn. Mine used to struggle to write a paragraph describing the study approaches they planned to use in my communication courses. However, to be fair, I’m not sure I had a lot of insights about my learning when I was a student. Did you?
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From Maryellen Weimer and Faculty Focus: Great ideas for helping students reflect on their learning process.

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Racism Insurance Promo for Dear White People: A Critique

Racism Insurance Promo for Dear White People: A Critique | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Racist speech is lampooned, sexism gets a pass, in "Racism Insurance" spot
Ann Johnson's insight:

A humorous way to explore White privilege in the classroom (and for White instructors, reminders of the need for frequent self-examination). As this critic points out, however, the sexism in the last video should be called out and rejected.

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Productive Online Discussions

Productive Online Discussions | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

From Synergia Newsletter (University of St. Thomas Faculty Development Center) -- Elizabeth Smith on making your online discussion more productive and creative.

Ann Johnson's insight:

Great insights from Elizabeth Smith. Highlight: there's more than one option for how to format online discussion, and format selection depends on your goals. 

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Facilitating Creative Online Forums and Discussion Boards in Online Learning

Facilitating Creative Online Forums and Discussion Boards in Online Learning | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
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A good approach to crafting effective discussion board prompts or questions -- drawing them in by letting them be creative.

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Learning to Let Go: Listening to Students in Discussion - Hybrid Pedagogy

Learning to Let Go: Listening to Students in Discussion - Hybrid Pedagogy | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
When a class involves discussion, we owe it to our students to not know what’s going to happen, lest we start dictating what we want them to think. To truly engage another in a conversation, we respond to the ideas that develop organically
Ann Johnson's insight:

Appreciated this observation: "I wasn’t actually letting students try things in our conversations. Instead, I expected them to say things, and I waited until they said what I expected. It was a farce, and I should have just told them what was on my mind and waited for them to ingest it, old-school style."

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5 Things You Can Do To Prepare For The New Semester – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

5 Things You Can Do To Prepare For The New Semester – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
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History will not repeat itself (i.e. lessons learned as a first-year faculty member)

History will not repeat itself (i.e. lessons learned as a first-year faculty member) | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
By Sarah Bisbing I survived my first year as a faculty member. In fact, I think I even did pretty well if I consider my student evals and the number of end-of-year hugs received. I’m going to pat m...
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Excellent advice for first year faculty from a veteran.

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The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard

The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Advantages of longhand over laptop note-taking in class -- recent research.

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Teaching & Learning - Helping Students More Accurately Assess Their Performance

Teaching & Learning - Helping Students More Accurately Assess Their Performance | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

"Learning, whether it’s learning content or learning about learning, is a student responsibility."

Ann Johnson's insight:

Great essay by Maryellen Weimer on the importance of addressing student over-confidence about their performance and their grades.

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Video series aims to help instructors help first-generation students @insidehighered

Video series aims to help instructors help first-generation students @insidehighered | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Faculty tips for teaching first generation students. Excellent summary and link to video resources.

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Sometimes 'Hand-Holding' Can Be a Good Thing

Sometimes 'Hand-Holding' Can Be a Good Thing | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

For first-generation and adult students, among others, a little extra help can make all the difference.

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Cruel Student Comments: Seven Ways to Soothe the Sting

Cruel Student Comments: Seven Ways to Soothe the Sting | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Reading students’ comments on official end-of-term evaluations—or worse, online at sites like RateMyProfessors.com—can be depressing, often even demoralizing. So it’s understandable that some faculty look only at the quantitative ratings; others skim the written section; and many others have vowed to never again read the public online comments. It’s simply too painful.

How else might you respond? Here are seven suggestions for soothing the sting from even the most hurtful student comments:
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Unlocking the Mystery of Critical Thinking

Unlocking the Mystery of Critical Thinking | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Critical thinking. We all endorse it. We all want our students to do it. And we claim to teach it. But do we? Do we even understand and agree what it means to think critically?

According to Paul and Elder’s (2013a) survey findings, most faculty don’t know what critical thinking is or how to teach it. Unless faculty explicitly and intentionally design their courses to build their students’ critical thinking skills and receive training in how to teach them, their students do not improve their ski
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How to Overcome the Fear of ‘Putting Yourself Out There’

How to Overcome the Fear of ‘Putting Yourself Out There’ | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
In honor of Arianna Huffington's marvelous book THRIVE, I want to write about a very specific aspect of well-being: freedom from fear of sharing one's ideas.
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Susan Cain, author of "Quiet," makes some very good points about the value of sharing your ideas and work. She also addresses social anxiety -- something that keeps many of us from putting ourselves out there.

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Flipping your course: Questions and answers

Flipping your course: Questions and answers | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Good advice for structuring your time expectations in a flipped course, and managing student expectations based on level of college experience.

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Teaching Statement as Self-Portrait

Teaching Statement as Self-Portrait | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
Drop the abstract description and make your statement of teaching philosophy a window into your classroom style.
Ann Johnson's insight:

Important insight: the teaching statement should be concrete, evoking your unique experience and style with examples.

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Working alone 'together' can be good motivation - Futurity

Working alone 'together' can be good motivation - Futurity | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
The sense that you're not the only one tackling a challenge—even if you're physically alone—can increase motivation, say researchers.
Ann Johnson's insight:

More good evidence for value of team-based learning in the classroom, but this study also reinforces the value of faculty 'accountability groups' to nurture productivity.

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"She Didn’t Teach. We Had to Learn it Ourselves.” | Faculty Focus

"She Didn’t Teach. We Had to Learn it Ourselves.” | Faculty Focus | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

"Yesterday I got an email from a faculty member who had just received her spring semester student ratings .  .  . She’d gotten one of those blistering student comments. “This teacher should not be paid. We had to teach ourselves in this course."

Ann Johnson's insight:

Essential reading for anyone trying new active learning strategies, flipping, or team-based learning this semester. Be sure to read third paragraph from the bottom on the importance of managing student expectations.

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Tenure-Track Wisdom, Part 1

Tenure-Track Wisdom, Part 1 | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
The first in a series of interviews with faculty members about what they learned during their first year on the tenure track.
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Great idea and good advice here.

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Four Key Questions about Grading

Four Key Questions about Grading | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Does grading provide feedback to help students understand and improve their deficiencies? The grade itself is feedback, but generally it is accompanied with faculty comments that justify the grade and offer suggestions for improvement. Most of us know the problem here, “The grade trumps the comment,” as one researcher cited says. Students tend not to read the comments; they look at the grade and get on with life.


Via Faculty Focus
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Playing with Teaching Words, Part 3: Active Learning

Playing with Teaching Words, Part 3: Active Learning | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
When I learned to teach… (Yeah, I know, insert eye rolling, if you must – but realizing I’ve wrapped 35 years of teaching, I should be able to use that phrasing at least once in a post, so…) When I...

Via Faculty Focus
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Putting to rest the active-passive dichotomy in describing effective teaching. A reasoned approach to balancing 'participation' and 'acquisition' in the classroom.

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Examining Knowledge Beliefs to Motivate Student Learning

Examining Knowledge Beliefs to Motivate Student Learning | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it
“I just cram for the exam and then forget everything.”

“If I can just get this last paper done I am in the clear.”

Comments like these make us cringe, but we all know the external factors that motivate students: grades, grades, grades. I spend a great amount of time providing students with concrete, detailed feedback on papers only to hear someone say, “Oh, I didn’t look at the feedback, just the grade.” From a faculty perspective, the grade is the least important. The joy of student engagement and learning drives our work. We ended up in higher education for a reason—most of us see great value in the learning process.
Ann Johnson's insight:

Good reminder of the need to assess student beliefs/assumptions as you shape their learning experiences.

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Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus

Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus | Web Resources for New Faculty | Scoop.it

Earlier this year, a couple of contributions to The Teaching Professor (Haave 2014) and Faculty Focus (Weimer 2014) discussed the place of learning philosophies in our teaching. The online comments to Weimer’s blog post (2014) made me think more about how we as instructors need to be careful to bridge instructivist and constructivist teaching approaches for students not yet familiar with taking responsibility for their own learning (Venkatesh et al 2013).

Ann Johnson's insight:

Thinking toward your Third Year Review portfolio (or tenure file)? Here are some good ideas for crafting your teaching philosophy statement.

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