Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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The internet of things

The internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
If the internet was a person, it would be too young to drive. What's next in the evolution of 'the internet of things'?

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Cheap, Pressure-Sensing ‘Electronic Skin’ - IEEE Spectrum

Cheap, Pressure-Sensing ‘Electronic Skin’ - IEEE Spectrum | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Seoul researchers have developed an easy-to-fabricate, membrane-based strain gauge system that’s as sensitive (and almost as flexible) as human skin...

 

... sensitive enough to feel the fall of water droplets, a human pulse in the wrist, and even the whisper-light tread of a lady-bug walking across the “electronic skin.”

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"Flex of a Finger" Biometric Control

ReadwriteWeb writes:

 

"Microsoft applied for a patent on electromyography (EMG) controlled computing on Thursday, suggesting that a future smart wristwatch or armband might simply detect a user’s muscle movements and interpret them as gestures or commands. The “Wearable Electromyography-Based Controller” could also use a network of small sensors attached to the body, all communicating wirelessly with a central hub.

 

Microsoft first treated the human body as just another input device when it launched the Kinect sensor, which tracks a user’s face and body via an onboard camera. Computing via brainwaves has also been proposed as an alternative method of input. Finally, EMG-controlled devices, such as prosthetics, have been talked about for some time. Still, all three methods have their challenges.Comments

In the future, Microsoft apparently believes, people may simply twitch their fingers or arms to control a computer, game console or mobile device.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/microsoft-tech-to-control-computers-with-a-flex-of-a-finger.php

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Open.Sen.se Beta

Open.Sen.se Beta | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Open.Sen.se is an open platform for all those who want to imagine, prototype and test new Devices, Installations, Scenarios, Applications for this globally interconnected and immersive world. Designers, developers, tinkerers, students, hobbyists, R&D departments, artists, self quantifiers, dataviz maniacs, whatever your skills are, we tried to make Open.Sen.se easy to use and yet powerful for you. Needless to say Open.Sen.se is free.

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Apple files patent for Google Glass competitor

Apple files patent for Google Glass competitor | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Apple's 2009 patent involves "movie glasses" that would be used to view content streamed from an iPod or other media device.


But over time (and no doubt influenced by Google's Project Glass) the movie glasses have evolved into the current filing for a headset that places a retina-quality heads-up display over one eye.
However, the helmet is still a mystery.

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Intel futurist Brian David Johnson on creating the tech of tomorrow

Intel futurist Brian David Johnson on creating the tech of tomorrow | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Intel, which employs more than 4,000 people in Ireland, relies on futurists like Brian David Johnson to deliver a vision of how we will be using technology in the future.

 

Eventually Johnson sees the devices getting smaller, thinner and almost invisible.

 

“When you talk about silicon architecture, right now we are at 22 nanometres, which is extremely tiny. When you look to 2020, the size of meaningful computational devices could reach almost zero. Moore’s Law will keep going until we get to virtually zero.

 

“The next big focus for Intel is seven nanometres. When we get to that level, chips will be so small that they can be powered by friction, the heat of your body or the movement of your hand.

 

“Once you have computation moving to almost zero, it means we can make anything into a computer.

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Dot the Connections: The Future of the Internet of Things | Broadband for America

Dot the Connections: The Future of the Internet of Things | Broadband for America | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Between 2011 and 2020 the number of connected devices globally will grow from 9 billion to 24 billion, according to The Connected Life: A USD4.5 trillion global impact in 2020. In this new report, R “Ray” Wang, a Forbes contributor, discusses the possibility of devices connected to, communicating through, and building relationships on the Internet. Over the next decade, Mr. Wang envisions:

 

Sensors will be even more ubiquitous. For instance, the camera at the traffic light and overseeing the freeway; those are sensors. That new bump in the parking space and new box on the street lamp; those are sensors. From listening for gun shots to monitoring a chicken coop, sensors are cropping up in every area of your life.

 

Machine to Machine [M2M] relationships will generate connected data that will affect many aspects of your life. Connected Data will be used to fine-tune predictives that will prevent crimes, anticipate your next purchase and take over control of your car to avoid traffic jams. The nascent form of this is already happening: Los Angeles and Santa Cruz police are using PredPol to predict & prevent crimes; location-aware ads popping up in your favorite smartphone apps; and Nevada and California are giving driver licenses to robotic cars.

 

Sustainability isn’t only about saving the planet. It’s also about saving money. Saving the planet, reducing dependence on polluting energy sources and reducing waste in landfills are all good things, but they aren’t part of the fiduciary responsibilities of most executives. However, Smart Buildings, recycling & composting, and Green IT all increase a company’s bottom line – all aspects of being a successful executive.

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Virginia Tech: RoboJelly

Researchers at Virginia Tech and the University of Texas at Dallas built Robojelly from materials known as shape-memory alloys, which return to their original shape when bent. Eight moving segments wrapped in carbon nanotubes and coated with a platinum powder replicate the jellyfish's natural opening-and-closing method of propulsion.

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High-Tech Outerwear Designed to Fight Air Pollution

High-Tech Outerwear Designed to Fight Air Pollution | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Behold, the ultimate in green fashion: a jacket that identifies and cleanses foul air.


The Netherlands-based design house Nieuwe Heren's urban security suit, named the "aegis parka."

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Forget ‘Cellphone,’ That’s a ‘Tracker’ in Your Pocket - Truthdig

Forget ‘Cellphone,’ That’s a ‘Tracker’ in Your Pocket - Truthdig | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Mobile phone service providers collect user information and share it with the government, to the tune of at least 1.3 million disclosures per year. What if our nomenclature reflected that?


Peter Maass and Megha Rajagopalan, digital privacy reporters for ProPublica, argue that cellphones function primarily as tools for keeping tabs on their owners. And our best hopes for addressing the dangers inherent in that fact begin with calling them by their rightful name.


—Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly. Follow him on Twitter: @areedkelly.

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A Phone that Knows Where You're Going

A Phone that Knows Where You're Going | Web of Things | Scoop.it

An algorithm can better predict your future movements by getting a little help from your friends.


Researchers in the U.K. have come up with an algorithm that follows your own mobility patterns and adjusts for anomalies by factoring in the patterns of people in your social group (defined as people who are mutual contacts on each other's smartphones).


All of the study participants lived within 30 miles of Lausanne, Switzerland, and were mainly "students, researchers, and people that are fairly predictable anyway." But the findings are considered noteworthy because they exploit the "synchronized rhythm of the city" for greater predictive insights.


The paper was part of a Nokia-sponsored Mobile Data Challenge grew out of another mid-2000s reality mining project sponsored by Nokia.

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You Will Want Google Goggles - Technology Review

You Will Want Google Goggles - Technology Review | Web of Things | Scoop.it

When Google unveiled Project Glass, many people shared my early take, criticizing the plan as just too geeky for the masses. But while it will take some time to get used to interactive goggles as a mainstream necessity, we have already gotten used to wearable electronics such as headphones, Bluetooth headsets, and health and sleep monitoring devices. And even though you don't exactly wear your smart phone, it derives its utility from its immediate proximity to your body.


In fact, wearable computers could end up being a fashion statement. They actually fit into a larger history of functional wearable objects—think of glasses, monocles, wristwatches, and whistles. "There's a lot of things we wear today that are just decorative, just jewelry," says Travis ­Bogard, vice president of product management and strategy at Jawbone, which makes a line of fashion-conscious Bluetooth headsets. "When we talk about this new stuff, we think about it as 'functional jewelry.'" The trick for makers of wearable machines, Bogard explains, is to add utility to jewelry without negatively affecting aesthetics.


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O.System - The future of personal electronics by Peter Krige - RCA IDE

O.System - The future of personal electronics by Peter Krige - RCA IDE | Web of Things | Scoop.it

“In 2025, consumer electronics will no longer be the same.”


Purchased through the O.System they will allow each and every one of us to customise our electronic products online, adding personal touches. This is a project by Peter Krige, Alexander du Preez and Hannes Harms, students of Innovation Design Engineering at the Royal College of Art.


Via Vavdo, Andrea Graziano
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EPoSS: "Managing complexity and ensuring supply - The Internet of Things in Logistics"

EPoSS: "Managing complexity and ensuring supply - The Internet of Things in Logistics" | Web of Things | Scoop.it
RT @robvank: EPoSS: "Managing complexity and ensuring supply - The Internet of Things in Logistics" | the internet of things http://t.co/RCMDhYc5...

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A Real Internet Of Things For The Developing World (And Burning Man)

A Real Internet Of Things For The Developing World (And Burning Man) | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Aria has a grand idea: creating an Internet-like network of autonomous aerial vehicles (AAVs)  that could one day allow someone to make a one-to-one sale with anyone in the world or send medication quickly to where it’s needed most, simply by delivering goods on a flying autonomous vehicle to its destination. But before Aria (that’s the name of Matternet’s open-source group) does that, it’s teaming up with ReAllocate--an organization that’s building a network of designers and engineers who want to use their expertise to work on humanitarian issues--for an experimental project at Burning Man (if Aria can secure tickets; that’s still up in the air).

 

After the Burning Man pilot, ReAllocate plans to bring the shipping container project, dubbed "Startup Country," to Oakland to create a portable kitchen for food entrepreneurs. "We’re transforming shipping containers into innovation centers," says Dr. Mike North, the founder of ReAllocate. "We want to take them into the developing world, bring people from the community in, and facilitate them developing their own social enterprises."

 

As with the Burning Man project, Aria can use these shipping containers in the developing world as ground stations where it can swap batteries and payload. "The ground stations are like the routers of the Internet. They can extend range and capacity of the drones," explains Arturo Pelayo, the co-founder of Aria.

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The Future Of Health Care Is You

The Future Of Health Care Is You | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Devices like smartphones, Fuelbands, and Fitbits are capturing increasingly insightful data, giving us instant feedback on our health, from how we eat, sleep, and exercise, to our heart rates, blood pressure, and stress levels. For those seeking more complex data about themselves, companies like Wellness FX, 23&Me, and San Intelligence are offering the chance to look at our own individual blood chemistry and DNA and make healthier choices based on that info.

 

The technology is going to progress faster than we realize. Soon we’re going to be drinking milkshakes containing microchips that can feed back to us the state of our physical selves in real-time. And as we reach that point, the most productive health change you can make is to exercise a little better or eat a little more mindfully.

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Siri is so aloof; Saga wants to get to know you

Siri is so aloof; Saga wants to get to know you | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A new personal assistant app called Saga makes its way into the iOS App Store on Tuesday, and it wants to get to know users better than they know themselves. Like the recently unveiled Google Now, Saga tries to take the Siri concept a step further by proactively telling users what they need to know when they need to know. Doing this requires lots of data and algorithms capable of learning what users are really up to when they’re out and about.

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ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge

ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things represents a big opportunity to drive growth for both UK and worldwide economies. According to IMS Research, governments will play a key role in defining the regulations that will propel shipments for M2M communications modules to more than 118 million units by 2016, especially in the automotive sector.

 ...

The first forum will meet on August 24 in the UK and will be chaired by Gary Atkinson, who leads the Internet of Things initiative at ARM.

 

“In the next five years, over £2.4 billion will be spent in the UK on smart home energy management devices, ranging from smart meters themselves to in-home devices that are connected to them. This is a great example of an Internet of Things application, but is only a fraction of the market that will open up over the next 15-20 years,” said Atkinson.

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Smart suit improves physical endurance

Smart suit improves physical endurance | Web of Things | Scoop.it
: Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering announced that it has received a $2.6 million contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop a smart suit that helps improve physical endurance for...

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Too many obstacles to 'smart homes' anytime soon: Pew Research

A lot of the elements of the much-anticipated “smart home” will be arriving on the scene by 2020, but the idea of a very smart, well-connected house may still be quite a ways off. That’s the takeaway from a new survey of 1,021 Internet experts, researchers, observers, and critics, released by the Pew Research Center. Respondents are fairly evenly split between those who agreed that energy- and money-saving "smart systems" will be significantly closer to reality in people's homes by 2020 and those who said such homes will still remain a “marketing mirage.”


Some 51% agreed with the statement that by 2020, “the connected household has become a model of efficiency, as people are able to manage consumption of resources (electricity, water, food, even bandwidth) in ways that place less of a burden on the environment while saving households money.”


via SmartPlanet.com (blog)


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Tapping Earth's magnetic field for indoor navigation

Tapping Earth's magnetic field for indoor navigation | Web of Things | Scoop.it

While outdoor navigation has been mastered with GPS satellites and cell phone triangulation, indoor navigation has proven more tricky.


Now, a group of researchers at the University of Oulu in Finland has tapped the Earth's magnetic field to create an indoor positioning system (IPS).  The researchers say their approach was inspired by studying the way homing pigeons and lobsters use anomalies in the magnetic field to navigate their travels.

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The Internet of things is coming to a grocery store near you

The Internet of things is coming to a grocery store near you | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Thin Film Electronics, a company that makes wafer-thin printed circuits that can be built into packaging materials, and Bemis, a manufacturer of both consumer products and wholesale packaging, have signed an agreement that will add circuits to your cereal box.


Bemis makes packaging for those products (and more) and by 2014 it hopes to use thin-film, printed electronics to add a few bits of memory and little intelligence to its packaging.


As I wrote back in October, the idea of smarter circuits that are still cheap enough to be used in packaging are integral to creating an internet of things.


Davor Sutija, the CEO of Thinfilm, envisions that the Bemis deal is a first step in packaging that will have both freshness indicators but also sensor platforms that can share data on where an item has been and what the environment was in those locations.

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The Internet of Things: how it'll revolutionise your devices

The Internet of Things: how it'll revolutionise your devices | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The age of the machines has arrived. We discover how the Internet of Things is changing how our gadgets behave.


It is suggested that consumers will be interested in "passive environmental monitoring, remote management and connectivity to everything" because it's is faster, cheaper and better."


Impacts on transportation are described:


"Is a city's free rent-a-bike scheme being used? Stick a RFID chip on the handlebars and someone can plot exactly where those bikes go, when, and who with. At night streetlights could switch on only when a car approaches – thus saving electricity – but more impressively, data could be collected to map urban travel patterns."


A Cisco-powered concept called U.Life is being developed as a global template in New Songdo City, 40 miles south of Seoul in South Korea.  The

city wide wired broadband network allows its 60,000 residents to use their smartphones, tablets and other touchscreen devices to control their homes' heating, lighting and air-con.  

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The Flight From Conversation

The Flight From Conversation | Web of Things | Scoop.it
We use technology to keep one another at distances we can control: not too close, not too far, just right: the Goldilocks effect.

Via Wildcat2030, Andrea Graziano
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Mariana Soffer's comment, July 4, 2012 9:49 PM
this is so true, txs for this post