Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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How Many Things Are Currently Connected To The "Internet of Things" (IoT)? - Forbes

How Many Things Are Currently Connected To The "Internet of Things" (IoT)? - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

This is a topic that is important to us at Cisco. We believe the number of internet connected devices reached 8.7 billion in 2012. There are a number of estimates out there by others, but they are generally in the eight to ten billion range. This number would include traditional computer devices, mobile devices, as well as the new industrial and consumer devices that we think of as things.


You can get background and references on that number in a white paper by Cisco’s IBSG group:http://www.cisco.com/web/about/a… Dave Evans on our team works with market researchers to sort these numbers out. IMS Research is traditionally a good source for this sort of data. (...)


This question originally appeared on Quora. More questions on Embedded Systems:


Rob Soderbery, Cisco Executive

07 Jan 2013

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2013: The year of the Internet of Things

2013: The year of the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Arkady Zaslavsky and pals at Australia’s national scientific research organisation, CSIRO, reveal how the enabling technologies that Ashton imagined have rapidly matured and that the Internet of Things is finally poised to burst into the mainstream.


Each year in Australia, for example, biologists plant a million or so plots of different types of grain to see which grow best in a wide variety of conditions. These plots are situated all over the country and create a logistical nightmare for the relatively small team who must monitor both the environmental conditions and the rate of growth of the plants.


Their solution is a wireless sensor network that monitors what’s going on and sends the data back to the High Resolution Plant Phenomics Centre in Canberra which runs the experiments.

 

These sensors are currently deployed at just 40 sites and generate some 2 million data points per week. But the widespread adoption of this kind of technology looks set to revolutionise this kind of testing. What’s more, various cloud-based services are emerging that are designed to help manage these kinds of sensors and the data they produce. 


MIT Technology Review

via The Physics arXiv Blog

04 Jan 2013

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The Internet of Things Starts to Bear Fruit « A Smarter Planet Blog

The Internet of Things Starts to Bear Fruit « A Smarter Planet Blog | Web of Things | Scoop.it

So, what exactly is bringing the Internet of Things to fruition? A big factor is the plunging cost of connectivity, which is being driven by the emergence of Heterogeneous Networks (often referred to as “HetNets”). HetNets offer a way to increase the density and bandwidth available to mobile devices. 


To give you an idea of their potential scale, Free.fr, one of the world’s first HetNets, located in France, has more than 4 million WiFi hotspots connected to the  network and enjoys data transfer costs that are probably far below $1 per gigabyte. (...)


The second major factor driving the Internet of Things is the explosion of low-cost, smart, standardized sensor networks. Consumer hobbyists are leading the way here. Kickstarter, the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects is hosting numerous sensor projects that are designed to enable consumers to rapidly deploy and utilize large numbers of sensors around the home and office.


Raspberry Pi is one of the most popular recent initiatives in this space. The company has created a credit card-sized computer that integrates with physical devices like TVs and keyboards to give users PC functionality, such as spreadsheets and word processing, without having to buy a computer. Designed for hobbyists, it starts at a mere $25.


Another interesting initiative is Sensordrone, a multi-sensor device for smartphones that was recently funded by Kickstarter that gives phones even more capabilities, like connecting to printers. In another development, Nokia pledged to push the envelope in terms of adding new and innovative sensors and geo-location capabilities to their phones.


By Paul Brody 

30 Dec 2012


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This Tiny Gizmo Could Be A Very Big Deal In 2013 - And Beyond

This Tiny Gizmo Could Be A Very Big Deal In 2013 - And Beyond | Web of Things | Scoop.it
A $70 gizmo from Leap Motion could change the way we interact with computers - and eventually, lots of other things, too.


Wired called this "the best gesture-control system we've ever tested." The Verge called it "the next big thing in computing."


Leap Motion has already received preorders worth tens of millions of dollars, says Andy Miller, the company’s president and COO. (...)


Because Leap Motion has big plans. Laptops and desktops are just the start. “The consumer is side a way of getting it out there, but the bigger business might be licensing deals,” Miller says. “We have been contacted by thousands of businesses that want to use this.”


He reels off potential applications that range from robotic surgery to fighter jets, from semiconductor clean rooms to fast-food restaurant kitchens. “We’ve talked about seatback screens on planes,” he says. “Climate control systems. Set-top boxes and TVs and remote controls. Tablets. MRIs.”


McDonald’s and Jack in the Box like the idea of putting Leap Motion controllers in their kitchens so that workers can manipulate screens without having to touch them.


Others want to use Leap Motion in casinos, nightclubs and DJ booths to let people control huge video boards.


“This is a big thing that really could change the way we interact with devices,” Miller says.


Dan Lyons / read write 

24 Dec 2012



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EyeSee You and the Internet of Things: Watching You While You Shop

EyeSee You and the Internet of Things: Watching You While You Shop | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Even the store mannequins have gotten in on the gig. According to the Washington Post, mannequins in some high-end boutiques are now being outfitted with cameras that utilize facial recognition technology. A small camera embedded in the eye of an otherwise normal looking mannequin allows storekeepers to keep track of the age, gender and race of all their customers. This information is then used to personally tailor the shopping experience to those coming in and out of their stores. As the Washington Post report notes, “a clothier introduced a children’s line after the dummy showed that kids made up more than half its mid-afternoon traffic… Another store found that a third of visitors using one of its doors after 4 p.m. were Asian, prompting it to place Chinese-speaking staff members by that entrance.”

At $5,072 a pop, these EyeSee mannequins come with a steep price tag, but for storeowners who want to know more—a lot more—about their customers, they’re the perfect tool, able to sit innocently at store entrances and windows, leaving shoppers oblivious to their hidden cameras. Italian mannequin maker Almax SpA, manufacturer of the EyeSee mannequins, is currently working on adding ears to the mannequins, allowing them to record people’s comments in order to further tailor the shopping experience.
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Kinect component maker to launch compact 3D sensor to fit in smartphones - Macworld Australia

Kinect component maker to launch compact 3D sensor to fit in smartphones - Macworld Australia | Web of Things | Scoop.it
PrimeSense, which developed the 3D sensing technology used in Microsoft’s Kinect, is set to unveil a compact 3D sensor that can fit into a variety of consumer electronic devices.

The Capri 1.25 embedded 3D sensor is around one-tenth the size of PrimeSense’s current generation of 3D sensors, the Israeli company said Tuesday in a press release. Capri has improved 3D sensing algorithms, it said.

Apple’s control through patents over many elements of touch-based user interfaces discourages competitors from innovating in this area, Malik Saadi, principal analyst with Informa Telecoms & Media, said Wednesday. Many vendors are looking into alternatives, like touch-free gesture recognition that can be facilitated by 3D sensors, he said.

Samsung is looking at gesture recognition and will probably be deploying it next year or soon after, Saadi said.

Voice and gesture recognition are key to the future of smartphones, Saadi said. The combination of touch with voice and gesture recognition will very likely lead to a superior user experience and innovative application development, he said.

- Macworld Australia
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When augmented reality hits the Internet of Things (Wired UK)

When augmented reality hits the Internet of Things  (Wired UK) | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Wired.co.uk examines how augmented reality and The Internet of Things -- both hotly tipped computing trends -- could impact each other in the coming years

Where they intersect could be an engrossing area -- with the visual and location-based aspect of augmented reality providing a real-time, real-place interface for the data being pumped out by objects. We’d be able to see not just whether a bus is behind a building but how many people are on it, whether it’s on time, where people are sitting on the bus, what the name of driver is and well, any other information you decided to put out there.

Currently AR is interesting, yes, but slightly random and patchy. With AR plus the Internet of Things, he could check out different temperatures in different parts of a building, track any given object or person and see or hear what was going on behind walls -- provided the right chips and sensors were in place.

It will allow us to engage much more deeply with what’s around us. Scanning down a street we could see which restaurants are full, which have seats, which shops have that game/coat we want in stock or where our friends are. Other applications for this engaging technology are likely to be games, or maybe training exercises because it’s engrossing and fast-moving.

14 Oct 2010
Anna Leach
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Climbing Trillions Mountain: a field guide to the Internet of Things

Climbing Trillions Mountain: a field guide to the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A fourth revolution (after the agricultural, industrial and information revolutions) is almost upon us: the age of the 'trillion-node network', also known as The Internet of Things.


Widespread machine-to-machine (M2M) communication is bringing about the Internet of Things — or 'the trillion-node network', as the authors of this book put it. Trillions: Thriving in the Emerging Information Ecology, which is written by the three principals of MAYA Design (a Pittsburgh-based design consultancy and technology research lab), addresses the problem of how to cope with an internet comprising trillions of nodes, the majority of which do not have a person directly controlling them. Peter Lucas, Joe Ballay and Mickey McManus warn of the chaotic complexity that's in danger of developing, and offer suggestions as to how to design a digital future in which "The data are no longer in the computers. We have come to see that the computers are in the data".


Up next is 'design science', an evolving discipline founded on a mixture of natural ecological patterns, professional design practices, traditional science and "a commitment to the search for underlying Architecture to provide structure". Key to the successful practice of design science, say the authors, will be: "Deeply interdisciplinary methods; Focusing on humans; Interaction physics; Information-centric interaction design; and Computation in context". 


The final two chapters attempt to discern what life will be like in the pervasive-computing world of the trillion-node network, without — wisely — being too specific. We are introduced to the concept of an 'information ecology' comprising 'life forms' (devices), 'currency' (information), architectures (information architecture and device architecture) and 'the environment' (human culture). Certain desirable properties emerge from such thinking, including resilience built on widespread redundancy, diversity and the embracing of stochastic processes.


ZDNet

Charles McLellan

10 Dec 2012

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Revolutionary evolution: The Internet of things and things to come

The digital world is evolution, per se — continuous, rapid, radical, and, by now, so pervasive that it is the Internet which is driving human evolution. It is the Internet which makes possible the future envisioned by genomics researcher Juan Enriquez, one where we choose what and who we are. It is the Internet which allows Intel Fellow Mark Bohr to foresee that "in the future, chips may become integrated directly with the brain, combining AI/human intelligence and dramatically enhancing our cognitive and learning abilities. ... lead[ing] to a "technological singularity" — a point in time when machine intelligence is evolving so rapidly that humans are left far, far behind." Is not the coming of the Internet a "butterfly effect," a change so profound that the world we know today simply disappears? (...)


Revolutionary evolution is the future — a series of paradigm shifts with unpredictable yet profound effects. Precisely because we are building upon an interconnected foundation of complex technologies, any small change may be extremely amplified. That Apple app store (cloud service) offers 650,000 applications, has 400,000,000 credit card numbers on file, and has engaged in 30,000,000,000 transactions. In dollar terms, that is $7 billion in revenue for app developers most of whom can be called "cottage industry." With respect to software development, this is revolutionary evolution. (...)


But even without directly implanted transducers of the sort described by Bohr, every nuanced movement or change in your orbit can be measured analyzed and correlated. So while there may be a temporary fear of direct transducer implants, your physical condition, actions and even intentions can be indirectly inferred from mega-sampling large number of interconnected transducers providing exactly the same result as an implanted transducer. (...)


Are you in control or entitled to be aware of the apps and transducers in your orbit? Would your apps or transducers have some sort of inferred or legal rights preventing you from turning them off or excluding certain ones? Is security merely a euphemism for control, and if so by whom? Is security evolving into an organic model perhaps one where your transducers have a kind of antibody that roams within your orbit identifying and destroying perceived malicious intruders, and if so what about the impact of false positives? Is everything we understand about security about to be obliterated? For that matter, is the meaning of "self" up for grabs?




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Would You Be Comfortable Trusting Your Health To a Robot Doctor?

Would You Be Comfortable Trusting Your Health To a Robot Doctor? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Technology is marching ever forward and the medicine is no exception. CNN's Fortune Tech predicts tech will eventually take over 80 percent of what doctors do today andthat might begreat, but would you feel comfortable putting your life in the handsof Dr. Robot?  Chances are that someday, you won't have a choice. 


by Gizmodo UK

09 Dec 2012

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Meet KUBI: A Telepresence Rig That Works Like Your Neck

Kubi means “neck” in Japanese and that’s just what this new telepresence product is supposed to reproduce.


This rig, designed to work with any tablet, essentially creates a user-controlled pivoting system that allows the person you are video-calling to control the position, angle, and rotation of the tablet camera.


It’s not amazingly complex nor is it completely mobile, facts that make Kubi far more interesting for, say, a small office or conference room. Controlling Kubi’s neck, the caller can look around the room, tilt the camera up and down, and keep the camera and tablet a safe distance from the proceedings. As a parent, I’d see Kubi being useful when talking with the family. Rather than one kid hogging the iPad, I could control my position remotely and see everyone in the room from a slight distance.


They’re selling pre-orders on the device for $200 on Indiegogo and are looking for funding of $200,000. I doubt it will be difficult.


via TechCrunch


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Seeking Cheaper Insurance, Drivers Accept Monitoring Devices

Seeking Cheaper Insurance, Drivers Accept Monitoring Devices | Web of Things | Scoop.it

LAST week, under my car’s dashboard, I installed a small wireless gadget that would monitor my driving. I wanted to see how it felt to have my driving behavior captured, sent to an insurance company and analyzed. More drivers, seeking discounts on auto insurance, are voluntarily doing just that.Insurers are offering these discounts as they aim to abandon the crude proxies they have long used to guess the likelihood that a particular policyholder will have an accident. These have included age, sex, marital status, miles driven (as reported by the driver) — and even credit scores, which can penalize those guilty of driving while poor.


Driving data is collected with a device that policyholders must be persuaded to install; it connects to the car’s computer system via a diagnostic port found in all cars since 1996. Such “user-based insurance,” the name for individualized pricing based on data collected from a vehicle, is spreading. Drivewise from Allstate is in 10 states; Drive Safe and Save, from State Farm, is in 16, with 11 more to be added next month; and Snapshot, from Progressive, is in 43.


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Will New Smart-Device Replace Your Doctor?

Will New Smart-Device Replace Your Doctor? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Portable medical devices may soon be small and inexpensive enough to measure your vital signs daily, replacing what would be trips to the doctor with digital diagnoses. One company, Scanadu, has announced plans to start selling its first device—the Scout, which monitors heart rate, temperature, blood oxygenation, and other vital signs—by the end of 2013, "as well as a disposable urine-analysis test that can swiftly detect pregnancy issues, urinary tract infections, and kidney problems, and a saliva analysis test that can detect upper respiratory problems like strep throat and the flu."


IdeaFeed | Big Think

Orion Jones

01 Dec 2012

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Faceless sensors and tiny routers needed for the internet of things

Faceless sensors and tiny routers needed for the internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Connecting sensors as well as connected devices to build an Internet of things-style service isn’t easy. But new products from vendors that range from Texas Instruments to ThingsSquared and Mobiplug make it easier for product vendors and consumers to build internets of things.

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Forget the Internet of Things: Here Comes the Internet of Cars

Forget the Internet of Things: Here Comes the Internet of Cars | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The connected vehicle is leading the automotive industry to its most significant innovation phase since the creation of the automobile itself.


What if large groups of people could go beyond ridesharing – replacing traditional car ownership altogether through on-demand access to the cars they want: a convertible in the summer, an SUV for winter ski trips?


What if driving skills could be computed as a score that warned us of bad drivers nearby – real time, on the road – also enabling navigation systems to offer safer alternative routes? Imagine if we could get rid of traffic jams and accidents altogether. Or how about if our cars picked up our groceries on their own – and dropped us off at the airport like a self-contained limo service?


What if automakers could subsidize our car purchases by working with telecommunications and other companies that want to capitalize on the lifetime revenue opportunity of a connected driver? Consider also the possibilities for insurance providers to charge higher premiums (for those who drive their cars themselves), or for local governments to monitor personal CO2 usage (in exchange for not taxing or tolling public roads).


BY THILO KOSLOWSKI
04 Jan 2013


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2013 will be the year of ‘the Internet of things’ as more than 5B wireless chips ship

2013 will be the year of ‘the Internet of things’ as more than 5B wireless chips ship | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Over five billion wireless connectivity chips will ship in 2013, according to ABI Research, as our appetite for everything mobile continues to grow. Bluetooth and Wi-Fi are both growing, of course, but so are lesser-known specs such as Zigbee, UWB, and, yes, even NFC. (...)


I talked to Peter Cooney, a wireless analyst with ABI, just before the the research company’s London offices closed for the Christmas long weekend.


“NFC has gone from two million devices in 2010 to 100 million in 2012,” he said. “Android is really driving that growth, but NFC is coming of age … and integration into smartphones is driving growth in other areas.”


That’s something we’ve seen a lot of this year: sensors and connected switches for windows and doors, lights, heating, and more. SmartThings wants to help youcontrol the real world, as does ReelyActive. And while NFC has been the next great thing for some time, we’re seeing a ton of innovation in the home automation space using multiple wireless protocols.


“In 2013 cumulative shipments of Bluetooth-enabled devices will surpass 10 billion and Wi-Fi enabled devices will surpass 10 billion cumulative shipments in 2015,” Cooney said in a statement.






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Changes to come with Internet of Things - Boston Business Journal

Changes to come with Internet of Things - Boston Business Journal | Web of Things | Scoop.it
And IoT will extend, expand and augment just about every conceivable installation of home, building, commercial, industrial and infrastructure automation. Smart meters may have been one of the first applications of IoT in energy, but it will soon be overshadowed by the impact(s) of devices as lowly as thermostats and light bulbs being elevated with intelligence and connected. Which brings me to this connection thing that seems to have so many people distracted. IoT solutions do NOT mean exclusively wireless.

To be sure, wireless connections will be a critical part of connecting the next generations of unattended devices, but, so too will wireline be an important part of the rich fabric of the IoT. What will they be connected to? Most importantly … YOU. As a private citizen, professional or public servant, your work, your play, your life, will be augmented by having some number of unattended devices monitoring – and perhaps controlling – one or more of the things, places, processes in your lives.

Boston Business Journal
Christopher Rezendes, President, INEX Advisors
18 Dec 2012
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Home Energy Management: 2012 Status Report

Home Energy Management: 2012 Status Report | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Home energy management in 2012, like every other year, finds us somewhere between the Flintstones and the Jetsons. There are nationwide television commercials that show a mom remotely turning on kitchen lights for her child using her smart phone. Two-way smart thermostats that can be controlled via the internet fly off store shelves. But dishwashers and refrigerators are hardly communicating with a utility to turn themselves on when energy is cheapest.

Progress is slow and steady in the home energy management and connected home industry. But mostly slow. Companies with solid analytics that can offer immediate savings to utilities without having to spend too much saw progress in 2012. But the notion of a home area network still seems like the Jetsons. The internet of things just hasn’t quite made it to the average home.

Greentech Media
Katherine Tweed
17 Dec 2012
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Quite a few examples in this report worth perusing if you're interested in smart grid developments.

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Doormat is not just a doormat

Doormat is not just a doormat | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Don Willems designed a doormat. The doormat is not just for wiping your feet, but also for lowering the electricity consumption. How does it do it? The doormat is at the same time a LED display that allows people to easily turn off devices when leaving the house as well as improving their energy consumption behavior by leaning from tailored coaching when coming in.

From his report, “The Doormate is for wiping your feet and supporting lowering of electricity consumption. It does the latter by communicating information through an integrated LED display. It allows people to easily turn of devices when leaving the house as well as improving their energy consumption behavior by learning from tailored coaching when coming in. One could say the Doormate is addressing both the ‘consumer’ – making sure no money is wasted when not at home and the ‘citizen’ – contributing by environmental friendly behaviour – in people.
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Read the full report for more information [PDF, 3M]

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On Sale At Last: Twine, Your Gateway To The Internet Of Things

On Sale At Last: Twine, Your Gateway To The Internet Of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A year ago, two MIT Media Lab graduates raised half a million dollars on Kickstarter to create Twine, a cigarette-pack-sized chunk of Internet magic that promised to turn any object in your home into a web-connected, interactive "smart product."...


Flip the rubbery, featureless box over on its back and two instructions reveal themselves: "Place this side up," and "go to Twinesetup.com." From there, configuring Twine feels like an adventure instead of a chore. Wow, it just connected to the Web by itself … Now a little light is turning on … Whoa, now I can see an image of it in my Web browser, sensing the temperature … What will this thing do next?


With Twine, building your own personal "Internet of things" is supposed to be easier than programming a VCR. And now that the product is available for purchase, it looks like creators John Kestner and David Carr have very nearly delivered on that ambitious promise.


John Pavlus

27 Nov 2012


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Sentient World

Sentient World | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"As more and more inanimate objects start to develop data and intelligence as they connect to each other, a network of autonomous interactions will emerge. In the future, our devices will be able to manage, analyze, report, predict, forecast, and more — while humans experience their days more intelligently and efficiently. We are experiencing a shift from a world of inanimate objects and reactive devices to a world where data, intelligence, and computing power are distributed, ubiquitous, and networked. We’re seeing a variety of market forces — from sensor, data capture, and a computing processor — empower this world for consumers and organizations alike. Who will deliver the content for and based on these interactions? Who will manage the data that arises? Understanding the intersection between physical and digital, while discerning signal from noise will become base-level survival skills for organizations."


The Sentient World Meets Marketing - via Rebecca Lieb


The sentient world is no a radical future vision, it’s present reality. Readily available technologies such as smartphones, Google Goggles (and soon, Glass), augmented reality (AR), smart keys and fobs, even laptops make it increasingly easy to apply layers of content, images and information on top of object, products, and places. And at the same time, to view and experience these additional layers of content. Technology developments will soon enable more and more objects to become sentient, as Corning so elegantly depicted in its highly successful A Day Made of Glass Video.


Also see Brian Solis' presentation at Le Web about the Human API and Internet of Things (via G+ Social Business)



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Apple Is Quietly Working To Destroy The iPhone

Apple Is Quietly Working To Destroy The iPhone | Web of Things | Scoop.it

During Business Insider's Ignition Conference last week, top Apple analyst Gene Munster of Piper Jaffray talked about Apple's tendency to cannibalize its own businesses and predicted that it would continue to do so.


He speculated that Apple is working on consumer robotics, wearable computers, 3D printing, consumable computers, and automated technology. (...)


Here's the other reason it's safe to assume Apple is quietly working on the destruction of its most massive business, the iPhone.
Just like Google and Microsoft, Apple is working on computerized glasses.


Computerized glasses, are, at the moment, the technology that is most likely to bring the smartphone era to an end.


They fit into an obvious pattern, where computers have been getting smaller and closer to our faces since their very beginning. (...)


In the patent filing, Apple calls the gadget a "head-mounted display" or "HMD."


Nicholas Carson

03 Dec 2012

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No Longer Vaporware: The Internet of Things Is Finally Talking

No Longer Vaporware: The Internet of Things Is Finally Talking | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is the long-prophesied phenomenon of everyday devices talking to one another—and us—online, creating new behaviors and efficiencies. It turned out to be vaporware.

-

The rise of the machines has begun: Steve Sande’s household fan is now self-aware. Sande, a Colorado-based tech writer, had noticed that his cat, Ruby, was suffering on hot summer days. His house doesn’t have air-conditioning, and he wasn’t always around to turn on the fan.

So Sande bought a new gizmo called the WeMo Switch, which connects to the Internet so you can turn on an outlet remotely. It’s also programmable. Using the free web service If This Then That, Sande created a script that monitors information from Yahoo Weather. If the temperature in his neighborhood hits 85 degrees, the fan turns itself on and cools the house. “This entire thing,” he says, “revolves around a 17-year-old cat.”

I love this story, because it illustrates something fascinating: The Internet of Things is finally arriving—and it’s bubbling up from the grassroots.

The Internet of Things is the long-prophesied phenomenon of everyday devices talking to one another—and us—online, creating odd new behaviors and efficiencies. Fridges that order food when you’re almost out of butter! Houses that sense when you’re gone and power down!

Back in the ’90s, big companies built systems to do tricks like this, but they were expensive, hard to use, and vendor-specific. The hype eventually boiled away. The Internet of Things turned out to be vaporware.

Until the past few years, that is, when the landscape shifted from below.


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MIT's Wearable Sensor Pack Turns First Responders Into Digital

MIT's Wearable Sensor Pack Turns First Responders Into Digital | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Robots have seemingly unlimited potential when it comes to search and rescue operations - they can enter hazardous environments, quickly map dangerous areas for first responders, and help establish communication links and a game plan for larger recovery and triage efforts. But in these scenarios, humans aren't going anywhere. We still need breathing, thinking bodies on the ground. So a team at MIT has built a wearable sensor pack that can "roboticise" human first responders, allowing the first person into a dangerous environment to digitally map it in realtime, just like a robot.


The prototype platform consists of a variety of sensors - accelerometers, gyroscopes, a camera, and a LiDAR (light detection and ranging) rangefinder, among others - affixed to a sheet of plastic roughly the size of a tablet computer, which is in turn strapped to the user's chest. These sensors wirelessly beam data to a laptop, allowing others to remotely view the user's progress through an environment. It also allows the sensor platform to build a digital map of the area as the user moves through it, providing the responders that follow with far more situational awareness than they would have otherwise.


Australian Popular Science

Clay Dillow

25 Sep 2012

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This happy tattoo is really a medical sensor-Futurity.org

This happy tattoo is really a medical sensor-Futurity.org | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A medical sensor that attaches to the skin like a temporary tattoo could make it easier for doctors to detect metabolic problems in patients and for coaches to fine-tune athletes’ training routines. And the entire sensor comes in a thin, flexible package shaped like a smiley face.


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