Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Owlet Vitals Monitor-See Your Child's Heart and Oxygen Levels on Your Smartphone.

Owlet Vitals Monitor-See Your Child's Heart and Oxygen Levels on Your Smartphone. | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Unlike a basic $35 baby-monitor, the $250 Owlet bootie and accompanying app can alert parents if anything serious has gone wrong, like if a kid stops breathing, or if his heart stops beating. That means no more unnecessary freakouts for the over-protective and inexperienced dad like Bruce, which leaves more time for him to do other dad things.

 

via Fast Company http://goo.gl/iv4Ivf

 

Learn More & Purchase At: http://www.owletcare.com The worlds first baby monitor that sends a babies heart rate, oxygen levels, skin temperature, sleep quali...

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X-Apple Siri Director is taking artificial intelligence into the cloud for Samsung's AI for the Internet of Things

X-Apple Siri Director is taking artificial intelligence into the cloud for Samsung's AI for the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The former director of Apple's Siri is taking Samsung's version of the artificial intelligence system to the next level. Luc Julia, vice president and innovation fellow at Samsung's Open Innovation Center in Menlo Park, Calif., demonstrated SAMI (Samsung Architecture for Multimodal Interactions), the Siri-like system central to Samsung's Internet of Things (IoT) strategy, at the MEMS Executive Congress 2013 in Napa, Calif., Nov. 7-8. 

SAMI is an interactive artificial intelligence (AI) similar to Apple's Siri that Julia helped develop when at Apple. Samsung's SAMI, however, goes far beyond Apple's Siri by aggregating sensor data from all types and brands of IoT devices in the cloud. The open system will then allow Samsung ecosystem partners -- some financed by a $100 million accelerator fund -- to perform deep analytics on that data before sending smart advice back to users. 

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Belinda Suvaal's curator insight, November 12, 2013 12:57 PM

interessante ontwikkelingen bij Samsung #AI

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Forrester: Google Glass will be the next iPhone

Forrester: Google Glass will be the next iPhone | Web of Things | Scoop.it
"Glass is continuously improving via over-the-air updates and new applications, and we have no doubt that in time, Glass will be the next iPhone," the Forrester study says.

 

"Roughly 21.6 million Americans would buy Google Glass if it were available, a new Forrester report says. But the current Explorer version is more of a Newton — Apple’s flawed and failed PDA — than an iPhone.
That’s 12 percent of the adult population.


In fact, despite the current prototype model’s limited battery life and restrictive API, Glass is more of a “when” than an “if” product, according to the survey of more than 4,600 U.S. adults.

 

ddrrnt's insight:

The easy access to location-based info in full AR is applauded.
Also, bone conduction is said to provide great audio quality, "without disrupting others who are nearby."

 

John Koetsier from VentureBeat contrasts Noam Chomsky’s belief that Glass is a privacy-destroying, Orwellian technology (http://youtu.be/rz1AImQ5jqA), with Forrester's view, "that Glass is not a good covert-surveillance camera — it’s too obvious, and its battery life is too limited."

 

I recall previously curated privacy concerns:
The efforts to ban ... http://goo.gl/IktYb (G+)
The pleas for policies ... http://goo.gl/GV9vW (G+)

 

thanks Tyger AC

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MYO - Wearable Gesture Control from Thalmic Labs

With the wave of your hand, MYO will transform how you interact with your digital world.

 

The MYO armband lets you use the electrical activity in your muscles to wirelessly control your computer, phone, and other favorite digital technologies.

 

Preorder at www.getmyo.com. Supports Mac, Windows, iOS, and Android.

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Apple Is Quietly Working To Destroy The iPhone

Apple Is Quietly Working To Destroy The iPhone | Web of Things | Scoop.it

During Business Insider's Ignition Conference last week, top Apple analyst Gene Munster of Piper Jaffray talked about Apple's tendency to cannibalize its own businesses and predicted that it would continue to do so.


He speculated that Apple is working on consumer robotics, wearable computers, 3D printing, consumable computers, and automated technology. (...)


Here's the other reason it's safe to assume Apple is quietly working on the destruction of its most massive business, the iPhone.
Just like Google and Microsoft, Apple is working on computerized glasses.


Computerized glasses, are, at the moment, the technology that is most likely to bring the smartphone era to an end.


They fit into an obvious pattern, where computers have been getting smaller and closer to our faces since their very beginning. (...)


In the patent filing, Apple calls the gadget a "head-mounted display" or "HMD."


Nicholas Carson

03 Dec 2012

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This happy tattoo is really a medical sensor-Futurity.org

This happy tattoo is really a medical sensor-Futurity.org | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A medical sensor that attaches to the skin like a temporary tattoo could make it easier for doctors to detect metabolic problems in patients and for coaches to fine-tune athletes’ training routines. And the entire sensor comes in a thin, flexible package shaped like a smiley face.


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Nanotechnology e-textiles for biomonitoring and wearable electronics

Nanotechnology e-textiles for biomonitoring and wearable electronics | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Nanotechnology e-textiles for biomonitoring and wearable electronics...


If current research is an indicator, wearable electronics will go far beyond just very small electronic devices or wearable, flexible computers. Not only will these devices be embedded in textile substrates but an electronics device or system could ultimately become the fabric itself. Electronic textiles (e-textiles) will allow the design and production of a new generation of garments with distributed sensors and electronic functions. Such e-textiles will have the revolutionary ability to sense, act, store, emit, and move – think biomedical monitoring functions or new man-machine interfaces – while ideally leveraging an existing low-cost textile manufacturing infrastructure.


Early e-textiles were bulky and not very user friendly garments, full of wires and sensors, and they were not suitable for mass production. But as researchers have started to make transistors in yarn form, public funding for this field increased (see for instance the European project PROETEX), advances in nanotechnology promise to dramatically advance the development of futuristic electronic textiles. (...)


"Although attempts have been made to fabricate nanotube yarns or impregnate fabric fibers with nanotubes, the vast majority of the studies on textile modification with nanomaterials was carried with nanoparticles" Dr. Nicholas Kotov tells Nanowerk. "There were various reasons for adding metal and semiconductor nanoparticles to fabrics such as fashionably glittering colors, antimicrobial function, UV protection, wrinkle resistance, and anti-odor function."

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Memoto: This tiny, wearable camera wants to capture your day in photos, taking lifelogging mainstream

Memoto: This tiny, wearable camera wants to capture your day in photos, taking lifelogging mainstream | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Lifelogging – the idea of carrying a tiny camera around with you and recording images from your entire day automatically – is nothing new, and yet it’s failed to catch on as yet. A new device and online service from Swedish startup Memoto that has just launched a campaign on Kickstarter, could change that.


Measuring just 1.4 x 1.4 inches, the Memoto clips on to your clothing. It takes a picture every thirty seconds throughout the day via its 5 megapixel camera, timestamping and geotagging each shot. Once you connect to your computer via USB, it will begin uploading your images to the accompanying Web service.

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Study: wearable computing will be a $1.5B business by 2014

Study: wearable computing will be a $1.5B business by 2014 | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Google’s Project Glass may sound like a bet on a distant future, but wearable computing could become a billion-dollar business sooner that you might expect: Juniper believes that smart watches, wearable fitness gizmos and head-mounted displays will bring in $1.5 billion by 2014.

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The Sensing Planet: Why The Internet Of Things Is The Biggest Next Big Thing

The Sensing Planet: Why The Internet Of Things Is The Biggest Next Big Thing | Web of Things | Scoop.it
About a decade ago, I would stand in the middle of a square somewhere and imagine that everything I saw could and would one day be possibly connected.

 

In my mind that was not such a new idea. Animists in Africa and Asia have for centuries talked about "living" inanimate objects, believing that things had a soul and taking good care of them. Humans are meaning-making machines, so we invest inanimate landscapes and objects with all kinds of qualities that they cannot really possess.


Ten years on, that daydream is becoming a reality with the Internet of Things. Loosely defined as a global process to enhance all objects with some kind of digital address, IoT is already coming to you: to your home as the smart meter that will streamline all your electrical appliances; to your connected car that will have distance sensors and eCall to alert accidents; and to your body as a patch in an intelligent T-shirt or the Siemens hearing aid that aims to pick up the fire truck noise and soften it before you “hear” it. In terms of "the next big thing" this is as big as fire and the book.

 

And it’s inevitable. Why? Because a confluence of historical factors has come together to make what was once the domain of science fiction a reality. Let’s quickly take a look at those drivers.


Rob Van Kranenburg @ FastCompany


Via Jose Murilo, P2P Foundation, Flemming Funch
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Intel Dabbles In Science Fiction

Intel Dabbles In Science Fiction | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Over the last few years, Intel futurist Rob Johnson explains, Intel has been running a “futurecasting lab,” where the company whiteboards what the future will look like. The effects-based models help guide Intel’s product development; Intel is working on its 2019 model right now.


In 2020, however, “something remarkable happens,” Johnson writes. “As we pass 2020, the size of meaningful computational power approaches zero.” In other words, with a microprocessor that small, you can put a computer in just about anything.


“When you get intelligence that small, you can turn anything into a computer,” Johnson writes. “You could turn a table into a computer. All of a sudden, it’s possible to turn your shirt, your chair, even your own body into a computer.”


And in some sense, that’s what Intel showed off in a series of demonstrations on Monday - intelligent interactions between various devices, some containing their own electronic eyes and ears. The goal was to use technology as a bridge between man and machine to facilitate context.

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Hackers backdoor the human brain, successfully extract sensitive data | ExtremeTech

Hackers backdoor the human brain, successfully extract sensitive data | ExtremeTech | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Using a commercial off-the-shelf brain-computer interface, researchers have shown that it's possible to hack your brain, forcing you to reveal information that you'd rather keep secret.

 

For $200-300, you can buy an Emotiv (pictured above) or Neurosky BCI, go through a short training process, and begin mind controlling your computer.

 

Both of these commercial BCIs have an API — an interface that allows developers to use the BCI’s output in their own programs. In this case, the security researchers — from the Universities of Oxford and Geneva, and the University of California, Berkeley — created a custom program that was specially designed with the sole purpose of finding out sensitive data, such as the location of your home, your debit card PIN, which bank you use, and your date of birth. The researchers tried out their program on 28 participants (who were cooperative and didn’t know that they were being brain-hacked), and in general the experiments had a 10 to 40% chance of success of obtaining useful information (pictured above).

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"Flex of a Finger" Biometric Control

ReadwriteWeb writes:

 

"Microsoft applied for a patent on electromyography (EMG) controlled computing on Thursday, suggesting that a future smart wristwatch or armband might simply detect a user’s muscle movements and interpret them as gestures or commands. The “Wearable Electromyography-Based Controller” could also use a network of small sensors attached to the body, all communicating wirelessly with a central hub.

 

Microsoft first treated the human body as just another input device when it launched the Kinect sensor, which tracks a user’s face and body via an onboard camera. Computing via brainwaves has also been proposed as an alternative method of input. Finally, EMG-controlled devices, such as prosthetics, have been talked about for some time. Still, all three methods have their challenges.Comments

In the future, Microsoft apparently believes, people may simply twitch their fingers or arms to control a computer, game console or mobile device.

 

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/microsoft-tech-to-control-computers-with-a-flex-of-a-finger.php

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Excellent Analysis on Wearable Tech for Healthcare market to hit $6B by 2016

Excellent Analysis on Wearable Tech for Healthcare market to hit $6B by 2016 | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The global market for wearable technology is expected to triple to $6 billion by 2016--and that's a conservative estimate, says market research firm IMS Research.

Via Richard Platt, Dionne
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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:41 AM

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): one of the better analysis' I've seen on wearables, and in this case focused on the healthcare market

Dionne's curator insight, December 3, 2013 9:34 PM

Success depends on wearable options being at least as efficient (or better) than what is currently on offer. 

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Next step for wearables? NeuroSky brings its smart sensors to health & fitness

Next step for wearables? NeuroSky brings its smart sensors to health & fitness | Web of Things | Scoop.it

It won’t be long before wearing a device on your wrist is considered passé.

A San Jose-based company called NeuroSky is building sensors to detect your brain activity, so you can control things with your thoughts. The applications for this kind of technology are endless — and are best known in the gaming community – but the company raised an undisclosed sum today to push into the health and fitness market.

The funding comes from Softbank, a Japanese corporation, in a round that chief executive Stanley Yang describes as “strategic.” Neurosky has raised about $40 million since its inception in 2006.

The company builds the chips and software and strikes partnerships with device manufacturers. It has developed a complex set of algorithms that can track analog electrical brainwaves and turn them into digital measurements. This kind of technology is still nascent, but is referred to by futurists as “thought controlled computing.”


Via Spaceweaver
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IT's curator insight, November 6, 2013 12:12 AM

Další přírůstek do rodiny nositelných cajků s několika senzory na hlídání zdraví a kontrolování funkcí při fitness.

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Wearable Electronic Sensors Can Now Be Printed Directly on the Skin

Wearable Electronic Sensors Can Now Be Printed Directly on the Skin | Web of Things | Scoop.it
New electronic tattoos could help monitor health during normal daily activities.

 

Taking advantage of recent advances in flexible electronics, researchers have devised a way to “print” devices directly onto the skin so people can wear them for an extended period while performing normal daily activities. Such systems could be used to track health and monitor healing near the skin’s surface, as in the case of surgical wounds.


So-called “epidermal electronics” were demonstrated previously in research from the lab of John Rogers, a materials scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the devices consist of ultrathin electrodes, electronics, sensors, and wireless power and communication systems. In theory, they could attach to the skin and record and transmit electrophysiological measurements for medical purposes. These early versions of the technology, which were designed to be applied to a thin, soft elastomer backing, were “fine for an office environment,” says Rogers, “but if you wanted to go swimming or take a shower they weren’t able to hold up.” Now, Rogers and his coworkers have figured out how to print the electronics right on the skin, making the device more durable and rugged.

 

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CES 2013: The 'internet of things' opens up huge possibilities for retailers

CES 2013: The 'internet of things' opens up huge possibilities for retailers | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A little less sexy than the latest smart TVs perhaps, but drawing significant crowds at CES, were displays of kitchens and kitchen appliances. It is now a very realistic possibility that we will soon (after years of hype) be using fridges that assess when we are running low on certain food items and automatically reorder through our regular online retailer of choice. Given coverage of retail results over the last week and the development of this sort of technology, Morrisons may have even more reason to regret its slow progress in online retail when compared to the likes of Tesco. Another interesting appliance was a dishwasher from LG that liaises with your energy supplier to ensure that it only switches itself on at a time of day when electricity is cheap.


There are a very large number of stands exhibiting smaller scale, wearable computing such as health and fitness monitors and smartwatches (often combined). One of the most interesting of these is the Pebble smartwatch which was the subject of much excitement at CES today. This hotly-anticipated smartwatch was created thanks to $15m of crowdsourced funding (Kickstarter's most successful project to date) and is being made available this month. The Pebble has an e-ink display similar to those found on e-readers and lasts seven days on one battery charge. The screen is able to display a multitude of apps as well as tell the time. Third-party developers will be able to create apps for the watch which can pair up with smartphones running Google's Android software or Apple's iOS. Perhaps of more importance longer term are the devices that will help us monitor our health; not only heartbeat, blood pressure and so on but food intake and amount of exercise.


A huge number of acres of exhibition space was taken by car manufacturers. It feels to me that much of the focus in recent years has been around using technology to improve the quality of the drive as opposed to the in-car experience. But that is clearly about to change. Many manufacturers were displaying technology that can seamlessly link car, smartphone and location data to deliver an enhanced experience. For example, Ford were showing a car that would read your text messages to you as you are driving. Others demonstrated how by synching car and smartphone, the music being played in your car could automatically adapt to driving conditions. One soundtrack for driving faster on an open road, another for city driving.


by Stewart Easterbrook

10 Jan 2013


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MIT's Wearable Sensor Pack Turns First Responders Into Digital

MIT's Wearable Sensor Pack Turns First Responders Into Digital | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Robots have seemingly unlimited potential when it comes to search and rescue operations - they can enter hazardous environments, quickly map dangerous areas for first responders, and help establish communication links and a game plan for larger recovery and triage efforts. But in these scenarios, humans aren't going anywhere. We still need breathing, thinking bodies on the ground. So a team at MIT has built a wearable sensor pack that can "roboticise" human first responders, allowing the first person into a dangerous environment to digitally map it in realtime, just like a robot.


The prototype platform consists of a variety of sensors - accelerometers, gyroscopes, a camera, and a LiDAR (light detection and ranging) rangefinder, among others - affixed to a sheet of plastic roughly the size of a tablet computer, which is in turn strapped to the user's chest. These sensors wirelessly beam data to a laptop, allowing others to remotely view the user's progress through an environment. It also allows the sensor platform to build a digital map of the area as the user moves through it, providing the responders that follow with far more situational awareness than they would have otherwise.


Australian Popular Science

Clay Dillow

25 Sep 2012

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The End Of The Smartphone Era Is Coming

The End Of The Smartphone Era Is Coming | Web of Things | Scoop.it

You've heard that Google is working on computerized glasses. They're called Google Glass, and developers can already buy them. It turns out Microsoft is working on something similar. It filed some patents on the project. There's a big difference between what Microsoft is working on and Google Glass, though. The most recent word out of Google is that Google Glass isn't going to use "augmented reality" – where data and illustrations overlay the actual world around you.

 


Via The Asymptotic Leap
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curiousjohn's comment, November 26, 2012 7:12 PM
Didn't know Microsoft was working on glasses. huh.
The Asymptotic Leap's comment, November 27, 2012 12:32 PM
curiousjohn: Take a look at the new post about Vuzix.
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The quantified self movement: some sociological perspectives

The quantified self movement: some sociological perspectives | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The concepts of ‘self-tracking’ and the ‘quantified self’ have recently begun to emerge in discussions of how best to optimise one’s life. These concepts refer to the practice of gathering data about onself on a regular basis and then recording andanalyzing the data to produce statistics and graphs relating to one's bodily functions, diet, illness symptoms, apperance, social encounters, phone calls, work output, computer use, mood andmany more aspects of everyday life. (...)


These technologies include not only digital cameras, smartphones and tablet computers, but also wearable wristbands, headbands or patches with digital technologies embedded in their fabric able to measure bodily functions or movement and upload data wirelessly. Tiny sensors can also be incorporated into everyday items such as toothbrushes, pyjamas or watering cans to measure such activities. Blood pressure cuffs and body weight scales can be purchased that connect wirelessly to apps. Global positioning devices and accelerometers in mobile devices provide spatial location and quantify movement. Apps that regularly ask users to document their mood can monitor affective states. There seems hardly a limit to the ways in which one’s daily activities can be monitored, measured and quantified. Some committed self-trackers even regularly send stool and blood samples for analysis and use commercially available genetic tests as part of their efforts to construct a detailed map of their bodily functions and wellbeing.


by sociologist Deborah Lupton

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Fitbit Ultra

Fitbit Ultra | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Fitbit has been a star in the wearable fitness tracker scene for quite some time. No wonder - it was one of the first devices that was small and pretty enough to be worn around the clock and it is able to track both activity and sleep.


Fitbit’s strength is that its functionalities are very simple due to the single-button control. Each press of the button cycles the display (OLED) through one of six modes (steps, distance, floors climbed, calories burned, flower (overall recent activity level and clock). Yet the device collects an immense amount of data that can nicely be viewed in several Fitbit apps or the Fitbit web application. Additionally, even more details can be logged, such as individual foods and workouts from your smart phone or computer. And weight and other health indicators such as blood pressure, glucose, and heart rate can be included as well.


via wearable-technologies.com

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Digits Hand Tracker: Freehand 3D Computer Interaction Without Gloves

Digits, a wrist-worn gloveless sensor developed by Microsoft Research in Cambridge, U.K., enables 3-D computer interaction in any environment and is practical beyond computer gaming. Please find the video with more technical details here


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Big Data in Your Blood

Big Data in Your Blood | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Sensors of your heart, blood, and brain are coming to market. These may be a boon to science and personal health. For the companies involved, they may be goldmines of intimate real-time data on millions of subjects.


Later this year, a Boston-based company called MC10 will offer the first of several “stretchable electronics” products that can be put on things like shirts and shoes, worn as temporary tattoos or installed in the body. These will be capable of measuring not just heart rate, the company says, but brain activity, body temperature and hydration levels. Another company, called Proteus, will begin a pilot program in Britain for a “Digital Health Feedback System” that combines both wearable technologies and microchips the size of a sand grain that ride a pill right through you. Powered by your stomach fluids, it emits a signal picked up by an external sensor, capturing vital data. Another firm, Sano Intelligence, is looking at micro needle sensors on skin patches as a way of deriving continuous information about the bloodstream.

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Augmented reality comes to contact lenses

Augmented reality comes to contact lenses | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Innovega is developing a contact lens called the iOptik lens that will provide the crucial step necessary to perceive an augmented, superimposed 3-D virtual reality.

 

It can also enhance your vision as you’re seeing normal reality. Using nanotechnology, the contact lenses allow users to perceive both reality and information provided by the Internet or another source.

 

The military is already exploring the use of these lenses, which could enable the distribution of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle intelligence in real time to soldiers in the field.

 

For civilian uses, the augmented view could allow for web surfing on the go. Innovega is particularly excited about 3D video gaming and is already laying the groundwork for that avenue. Everyone from tourists exploring a new city to drivers navigating a new route could benefit from augmented-reality lenses.

 

http://innovega-inc.com/http://innovega-inc.com/


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How To Reimagine Wearable Technology - PSFK

How To Reimagine Wearable Technology - PSFK | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Digital Art Director Dhani Sutanto has been developing a line of wearable Oyster Cards for Londoners and envisions a future of DIY wearable devices. One of a series of interviews brought to you by the Heineken Ideas Brewery.

Via Peter Vander Auwera
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