Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Can We Trust Real-Time, Collective Intelligence to Live a Better Life?

Can We Trust Real-Time, Collective Intelligence to Live a Better Life? | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Networked objects are learning to anticipate our needs and orchestrate responses that deliver safety, efficiency, and convenience.

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Jen: This anticipatory alarm received information from the cloud regarding weather and traffic, but also from the car itself. The car could also push a message to the cloud that its gas level was low. The system would then anticipate that the driver might have to stop for gas and add that to the expected commute time.

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Tim: The vast majority of trips that we take in vehicles tend to be trips we’ve made before, but having that information, creating a profile or history in order to derive conclusions about what someone might be doing on a Tuesday at 5:30, provides useful information. If it’s aggregated and people opt in, that can beneficially impact the traffic load balancing. It could help create an efficient use of infrastructure and help the overall impact of transportation as it plays out.

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Jennifer Healey, research scientist at Intel, and Tim Plowman, embedded user experience lead with Intel Labs’ Experience Design team.

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CES 2013: The 'internet of things' opens up huge possibilities for retailers

CES 2013: The 'internet of things' opens up huge possibilities for retailers | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A little less sexy than the latest smart TVs perhaps, but drawing significant crowds at CES, were displays of kitchens and kitchen appliances. It is now a very realistic possibility that we will soon (after years of hype) be using fridges that assess when we are running low on certain food items and automatically reorder through our regular online retailer of choice. Given coverage of retail results over the last week and the development of this sort of technology, Morrisons may have even more reason to regret its slow progress in online retail when compared to the likes of Tesco. Another interesting appliance was a dishwasher from LG that liaises with your energy supplier to ensure that it only switches itself on at a time of day when electricity is cheap.


There are a very large number of stands exhibiting smaller scale, wearable computing such as health and fitness monitors and smartwatches (often combined). One of the most interesting of these is the Pebble smartwatch which was the subject of much excitement at CES today. This hotly-anticipated smartwatch was created thanks to $15m of crowdsourced funding (Kickstarter's most successful project to date) and is being made available this month. The Pebble has an e-ink display similar to those found on e-readers and lasts seven days on one battery charge. The screen is able to display a multitude of apps as well as tell the time. Third-party developers will be able to create apps for the watch which can pair up with smartphones running Google's Android software or Apple's iOS. Perhaps of more importance longer term are the devices that will help us monitor our health; not only heartbeat, blood pressure and so on but food intake and amount of exercise.


A huge number of acres of exhibition space was taken by car manufacturers. It feels to me that much of the focus in recent years has been around using technology to improve the quality of the drive as opposed to the in-car experience. But that is clearly about to change. Many manufacturers were displaying technology that can seamlessly link car, smartphone and location data to deliver an enhanced experience. For example, Ford were showing a car that would read your text messages to you as you are driving. Others demonstrated how by synching car and smartphone, the music being played in your car could automatically adapt to driving conditions. One soundtrack for driving faster on an open road, another for city driving.


by Stewart Easterbrook

10 Jan 2013


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Sensor networks in SF and LA eliminate the search for parking spots | ExtremeTech

Sensor networks in SF and LA eliminate the search for parking spots | ExtremeTech | Web of Things | Scoop.it
By placing magnetic sensors underneath parking spots, drivers in San Francisco can check for available spaces in real time on their smartphones.


According to Technology Review, as many as a third of cars on the road in urban areas are circling the block to find a parking spot. This obviously slows down other cars on the road, leads to huge amounts of unnecessary pollution, and more accidents. “Circling drivers are distracted drivers,” says Jay Primus, who manages SFpark. “They’re much more likely to hit pedestrians, bicyclists, and other cars, and as they search for parking spots, making frequent turns and making frequent stops, they can cause unpredictable delays to the transit system.”


Sensor-based smart parking systems, then, could herald a huge advance for car-based transportation systems. Over in Los Angeles, which is also building a smart parking system, researchers found that a single neighborhood of 15 blocks clocked up an additional 350,000 miles every year by spending three minutes looking for a parking spot. The problem in LA is different from San Francisco: In LA, there are plenty of spare spaces, but because of sprawl and the size of the blocks, there’s a risk of having to drive a long distance to find a spot. These sensor networks will allow you to push a button on your smartphone and be directed to the closest spot.

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Can Connected Cars Save The World? - Forbes

Can Connected Cars Save The World? - Forbes | Web of Things | Scoop.it
By Judith Magyar, Executive Office, Product GTM and Mobile Division, SAP Cars today don't just carry you where you want to go. They inform you about the weather, bring you to unfamiliar places and remind you about maintenance.

 

Cars today don’t just carry you where you want to go. They inform you about the weather, bring you to unfamiliar places and remind you about maintenance. They entertain you and your passengers with state of the art sound and video systems, a coffee tray conveniently angled under your elbow. Cars today are a mobile extension of your living room. Cars tomorrow will be that and more. By becoming an extension of your office, they can be the workplace of the future and key players in the internet of things.

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The Internet of things: Smart houses, smart traffic, smart health

In the same way as we put ID chips on products, we can attach sensors to ourselves and allow them to communicate via the Web to other objects around us. The health service is currently testing sensors on elderly patients living at home. The sensors can monitor pulse and blood pressure.


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Major changes in the energy sector in recent years mean that the need for smart, flexible energy is increasing, and that energy production and storage facilities will have to become more coordinated. Current methods mean that our electricity is supplied by large, commercial energy companies from coal, gas and nuclear power stations.


So far, these centrally controlled systems have not needed to communicate much with the outside world. In the future, however, distributed energy sources provided by multiple suppliers will take over. These sources will come from renewable energy such as hydro, wind and solar.

 

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Norwegians are in favour of the service, since we think that the environment and saving energy are important. Americans, on the other hand, are sceptical: 'Are the energy companies going to see inside my fridge?!' With a box on the wall, information will flow both ways, but exactly what data will go out?

 

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Electric cars will be able to connect to the smart future grid. Each car will contain a unique identifying SIM/MIM card, like the card in your mobile.


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When vehicles and road infrastructure come online and communicate with each other, the range of opportunities will be enormous. When your car is connected to the Internet of Traffic, you will be able to receive information about everything that is happening around you. How many other cars are on the road? Which is the quickest route, taking traffic into account, and how fast should you drive if you want the next traffic light to be on green?

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The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide

The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Web of Things | Scoop.it

China, Japan and the European Union all invest about €1 billion a year in the Internet of Things; it is not known how much the US spends but the country also tags, scans and monitors goods and services. "The question of whether this is a desirable development or not is no longer relevant, the technology is there and we're using it," says IT specialist Arjan Geurts of Twynstra Gudde Advice Bureau.

 

The technical problems have been solved; an RFID or Radio Frequency Identification tag costs just five cents and wireless internet is in the ascendancy. The amount of information being sent is relatively small, which means there is very little chance of overloading the internet connection. Geurts: "the advent of the smartphone is the motor driving technological developments."

 

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Asia is in the vanguard when it comes to the Internet of Things. Van 't Hof: "Chinese and Japanese users have integrated the technology very harmoniously. When China introduced electronic licence plates in order to monitor and regulate traffic, the authorities feared it would lead to riots as the technology could be used to restrict freedom of movement. However, there were no protests once the advantages of the system were explained and assurances about data accumulation were given. Transparency was the key."

 

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The privacy issues don't worry companies very much, but security is very much an issue. Jaap-Henk Hoepman, a computer security and privacy expert attached to Radboud University in Nijmegen, says, "If something goes wrong, the damage is enormous. A company could be stuck with an entire shipment of perishable goods if the tracking system goes down or could be hit by digital industrial espionage."

 

"But that's no reason not to go ahead. We have to be aware of the risks. About 90 percent of the applications for this technology haven't even been thought of yet. And there will certainly be ways to use the technology that will make us wonder how we ever survived without them."

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Science fiction no more: The perfect city is under construction

Science fiction no more: The perfect city is under construction | Web of Things | Scoop.it

More than 300 sensors are implanted throughout each vehicle to monitor everything from air displacement to tire temperature to the driver’s heart rate. These data are continuously transmitted back to a control room, where engineers run millions of calculations in real time and tweak their driver’s strategy accordingly.

 

Through this process, every last ounce of efficiency and performance is wrung out of each car. And so it will be with cities like PlanIT Valley, currently being built from scratch in northern Portugal. Slated for completion in 2015, PlanIT Valley won’t be a mere “smart city” — it will be a sentient city, with 100 million sensors embedded throughout, running on the same technology that’s in the Formula One cars, each sensor sending a stream of data through the city’s trademarked Urban Operating System (UOS), which will run the city with minimal human intervention.'

 

“We saw an opportunity … to go create something that was starting with a blank sheet,” said PlanIT Valley creator Steve Lewis, “thinking from a systems-wide process in the same way we would think about computing technologies.”


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'City in a garden' can still be wired

'City in a garden' can still be wired | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A new technology revolution is brewing, which Harrison dubs the wired city, or "the internet of things".

 

Harrison - a softly spoken type, happiest when he discussing the techie details - is a British scientist who has taken a roundabout route through research in medical imaging and mobile computing to head IBM's Smarter City strategy.  [...]

 

Harrison says the foundation of the smart cities of the future is the three "i's" of instrumentation, interconnection and intelligence.

 

The interconnection is the obvious bit. With cheap and ubiquitous communication - broadband, wi-fi, cellphones, the internet - people can be digitally plugged in the whole time.  [...]

 

But there is an equivalent revolution happening in instrumentation - the cheap sensors, GPS locator chips and other data gathering and tracking devices that can be made for throwaway prices.

 

From a city bus to a private car to a pallet of goods to a can of beans, there is nothing that cannot be monitored, measured or accessed in real-time.

Together, interconnection and instrumentation makes for a nervous system and its sense organs: a wired city with a network of perception and control.

 

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Dual RFID-ZigBee sensors to enable NFC applications for the Internet of Things | ECN: Electronic Component News

Zaragoza, Spain-based Libelium has launched a new RFID/NFC module for its Waspmote sensor platform. The new radio module extends Waspmote features allowing the sensor data to be used in Location Based Services (LBS), such as asset tracking, supply chain monitoring, intelligent shopping or access management.

 

By using RFID/NFC (passive sensors) along with ZigBee (active sensors), Libelium says asset tracking can be more accurate than ever along the whole supply chain process. Product management software such as ERPs will have access in real time to information related to remaining stock, storage and transportation conditions (temperature and humidity levels, vibrations, light exposure, etc), expiration dates and even consumer profiles, knowing time spent in front of a shelf or products picked up and not bought.

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Drive by wire

The more fascinating thing is what happens when vehicles start to communicate. Paul Newman, head of the Mobile Robotics Unit at Oxford proposes that your vehicle should learn your routes; one day, he imagines, a little light comes on indicating that it's ready to handle the drive itself. Newman wants to reclaim his time ("It's ridiculous to think that we're condemned to a future of congestion, accidents, and time-wasting"), but since GPS is too limited to guide an automated car – it doesn't work well inside cities, it's not fine-grained enough for parking lots – there's talk of guide boxes. Newman would rather take cues from the existing infrastructure the way humans do. But give vehicles the ability to communicate and share information – maps, pictures, and sensor data. "I don't need a funky French car bubble car. I want today's car with cameras and a 3G connection."

 

via newswireless.net - by Wendy M Grossman

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'Smart' cities aim to predict -- and manage -- traffic future

'Smart' cities aim to predict -- and manage -- traffic future | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Look at what IBM is currently doing in the Chinese city of Zhenjiang. Using its Intelligent Operations Center for Smarter Cities, Big Blue aims to help the city of three million use analytics to not only enable real-time bus monitoring and management, but to simulate traffic flow patterns ahead of time. By anticipating traffic problems before they happen, IBM’s Intelligent Transportation technology is designed to improve the city’s public transit system and “increase traffic throughput” … in other words, make it possible for more traffic to flow through streets without the need to build more roads or otherwise radically change the existing infrastructure."

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Cerf on science: The father of the Internet talks string theory, the physics of Angry Birds & more

Cerf on science: The father of the Internet talks string theory, the physics of Angry Birds & more | Web of Things | Scoop.it

When Vint Cerf talks about Google's upcoming global Science Fair, you can hear the infectious enthusiasm in his voice.

Again, Cerf sees some aspects of that fictional world becoming reality, especially with regard to the Internet of Things. “The Android OS is turning out to be of interest… in other devices, things that consume electricity, appliances around the house,” he said.

 

And of course, there’s Google’s revolutionary self-driving cars.

 

“We’re very proud of those cars,” said Cerf. “This is turning out to be an incredible period of time when we’re able to harness the power of computing in small devices and also harnessing huge computing power in the form of clouds.”

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The Internet Gets Physical

The Internet Gets Physical | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Across many industries, products and practices are being transformed by communicating sensors and computing intelligence. The smart industrial gear includes jet engines, bridges and oil rigs that alert their human minders when they need repairs, before equipment failures occur. Computers track sensor data on operating performance of a jet engine, or slight structural changes in an oil rig, looking for telltale patterns that signal coming trouble.

 

SENSORS on fruit and vegetable cartons can track location and sniff the produce, warning in advance of spoilage, so shipments can be rerouted or rescheduled. Computers pull GPS data from railway locomotives, taking into account the weight and length of trains, the terrain and turns, to reduce unnecessary braking and curb fuel consumption by up to 10 percent."

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These Are The Killer Apps That Will Make 'The Internet Of Things' Indispensable In Everyday Life

These Are The Killer Apps That Will Make 'The Internet Of Things' Indispensable In Everyday Life | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Here are some of the devices and applications that will be implemented at the consumer and civic level that we think will make the Internet of Things, or IOT, a critically important part of our daily lives:

Kitchen and home appliances  such as refrigerators, washers and dryers, and coffee makers that can keep track of when the milk is out and let you know when the clothes are dry.

 

Lighting and heating products , including bulbs, thermostats, and air conditioners that maximize energy efficiency.

 

Safety and security monitoring devices such as baby and assisted living monitoring systems, smoke detectors, fire hydrants, cameras, sensor-equipped drawers and safes, and home alarm systems. 

 

Health and fitness products that measure exercise, steps, sleep, weight, blood pressure, and other statistics.

 

Intelligent traffic management systems , including toll-taking operations, congestion penalties, and smart parking-space management.

 

Waste management systems , such as garbage cans and recycle bins with RFID tags that allow sanitation staff to see when garbage has been put out."Pay as you throw programs" are also likely to decrease garbage waste and increase recycling efforts.

 

Industrial uses , including Internet-managed assembly lines, connected factories, and warehouses, etc.

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Seeking Cheaper Insurance, Drivers Accept Monitoring Devices

Seeking Cheaper Insurance, Drivers Accept Monitoring Devices | Web of Things | Scoop.it

LAST week, under my car’s dashboard, I installed a small wireless gadget that would monitor my driving. I wanted to see how it felt to have my driving behavior captured, sent to an insurance company and analyzed. More drivers, seeking discounts on auto insurance, are voluntarily doing just that.Insurers are offering these discounts as they aim to abandon the crude proxies they have long used to guess the likelihood that a particular policyholder will have an accident. These have included age, sex, marital status, miles driven (as reported by the driver) — and even credit scores, which can penalize those guilty of driving while poor.


Driving data is collected with a device that policyholders must be persuaded to install; it connects to the car’s computer system via a diagnostic port found in all cars since 1996. Such “user-based insurance,” the name for individualized pricing based on data collected from a vehicle, is spreading. Drivewise from Allstate is in 10 states; Drive Safe and Save, from State Farm, is in 16, with 11 more to be added next month; and Snapshot, from Progressive, is in 43.


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Futurist's Cheat Sheet: Internet of Things

Futurist's Cheat Sheet: Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"There are so many ways that an Internet of Things could impact people’s lives that it is hard to describe everything. Distilling it to a few key areas helps define what the scope of an Internet of Things could be: infrastructure (buildings and utilities), consumer (cars and homes), health care and businesses (consumer products and retail locations).

 

Weather-related sensors could help agriculture by monitoring the moisture in the air or ground and give farmer’s warning about droughts. Smart buildings can provide enhanced security for the people that enter them or warning on disasters such as earthquakes. Connected cars can improve traffic flows or allow functions to be controlled remotely. Items within the home (such as the toaster) can be controlled and monitored and even connected to each other.

 

Health care is an interesting avenue for the Internet of Things. Certain aspects of the body could be connected to the Internet. Heart sensors could give patients and doctors data to prevent disease. Sensors that monitor white blood cells could give cancer or AIDS patients warning of a relapse.

 

The scope and impact of the Internet of Things is almost limitless. It is just up to the innovators of the world to be creative and find ways to make it work." 

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Dot the Connections: The Future of the Internet of Things | Broadband for America

Dot the Connections: The Future of the Internet of Things | Broadband for America | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Between 2011 and 2020 the number of connected devices globally will grow from 9 billion to 24 billion, according to The Connected Life: A USD4.5 trillion global impact in 2020. In this new report, R “Ray” Wang, a Forbes contributor, discusses the possibility of devices connected to, communicating through, and building relationships on the Internet. Over the next decade, Mr. Wang envisions:

 

Sensors will be even more ubiquitous. For instance, the camera at the traffic light and overseeing the freeway; those are sensors. That new bump in the parking space and new box on the street lamp; those are sensors. From listening for gun shots to monitoring a chicken coop, sensors are cropping up in every area of your life.

 

Machine to Machine [M2M] relationships will generate connected data that will affect many aspects of your life. Connected Data will be used to fine-tune predictives that will prevent crimes, anticipate your next purchase and take over control of your car to avoid traffic jams. The nascent form of this is already happening: Los Angeles and Santa Cruz police are using PredPol to predict & prevent crimes; location-aware ads popping up in your favorite smartphone apps; and Nevada and California are giving driver licenses to robotic cars.

 

Sustainability isn’t only about saving the planet. It’s also about saving money. Saving the planet, reducing dependence on polluting energy sources and reducing waste in landfills are all good things, but they aren’t part of the fiduciary responsibilities of most executives. However, Smart Buildings, recycling & composting, and Green IT all increase a company’s bottom line – all aspects of being a successful executive.

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The internet of things: how connected devices can drive sustainability

The internet of things: how connected devices can drive sustainability | Web of Things | Scoop.it

... let's imagine how objects with connected online identities can actually drive sustainability. Imagine a portfolio of household good products – your laundry detergent and your dishwater – communicating with you to give a personal record that can help reduce water and energy use. Or imagine medical devices like glucose monitors that come with dietary advice and medicines that provide online side-effect alerts and tests. Or wine and spirits bottles that provide not just terroir history and cocktail tips but also personalised healthy drinking advice.

 

Established peer-to-peer services like AirBnB and the US private car sharing/rental company Relay Rides already point to how connected objects can promote sustainability. In the case of Relay Rides, subscribers who need access to cars but don't want to own a vehicle rent other people's private cars on a journey-by-journey basis. Now spin that model forward to multiple shared ownership of a single vehicle equipped with a digital identity connected to all the owners. The vehicle becomes the hub of an online network that allows, for example, four different owners, to effectively share that one car.

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Mobile and the Internet of Things enable contextual-intelligence

Mobile not only increases the reach of services but it provides additional context, such as location and presence. Location technologies–such as triangulation, wireless location signatures, and GPS–will be combined to provide rich indoor and outdoor location for both people and things. In the future, embedded sensors that provide environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature will be commonplace. Sensors will provide another aspect of context that services can tap into.


For example, your mobile device has access to your calendar so it knows if you’re running late for a meeting in downtown L.A. It can alert your car to connect to services like Streetline to help you find an available (sensor-enabled) parking spot while alerting your manager that you’re late. Other examples could link contextual attributes, such as presence and location, with enterprise social software. Instead of using a paging system, a nurse could use enterprise social software on a tablet to locate an available cardiologist on the third floor of a hospital and a defibrillator on the fourth floor.

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Mariana Soffer's comment, June 19, 2012 8:40 AM
very interesting
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The Networked Urban Environment

The Networked Urban Environment | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Imagine never having to look for a parking space ever again. Imagine that from here on out, this problem is solved. Fast-forward to 2025.

 

Urban infrastructures are increasingly being equipped with sensors and other means of collecting information and channeling our everyday actions, from energy use to parking patterns, into software and networks that analyze data and act upon it. Cities--and communities-- are becoming “smarter” as “the internet of things” evolves. What this means is that more and more people and things, including parking spaces are becoming connected, allowing for better prediction models of traffic and energy usage thanks to real-time data flows, leading to better awareness of current resource statuses and more practical matters such as more dependable payment mechanisms.

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Photos from the frontier: The Internet of Things

Photos from the frontier: The Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The devices are appearing where once no semiconductors were found, in everything from hydraulic pumps to wristwatches, board games and bandages. Indeed the apps frontier is almost comically diverse.

 

In a keynote at the Mobile World Congress earlier this year Ralph de la Vega, chief executive of AT&T, talked about wireless sensor networks measuring both the moisture content of farm fields to automate irrigation systems and the fullness of dumpsters to calculate the most efficient routes for garbage trucks.

 

“If you think about our future think trash, think dirt—there’s money there,” he quipped.

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China starts to build core network system of Internet of Things

... In addition to the food and medicine safety data platform, other first-class special platforms of the core network of the "Internet of Things" include platforms of the environmental protection, water conservancy, electric power, shipping, logistics, education, production safety monitoring, civil administration of the community, intelligent city, vehicle network, industrial equipment operation monitoring, digital television and smart household appliances.

 

via - People's Daily Online

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Boston Testing App for Auto-Detecting Potholes

Boston Testing App for Auto-Detecting Potholes | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Street Bump automatically transmits the presence of rough roads to city workers, helping improve the timeliness of road repairs.

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Wireless company probing "Internet of Things" for utilities

The number of connected objects is projected to reach 50 billion by 2020. Despite this, and the fact that the Internet of Things is viewed as a major driver of new service and business revenues, IoT has traditionally been held back by a lack of data sharing.


"For example, data from smart meters or road traffic surveillance cameras are used for one isolated application and not available for general use," said Graham Fisher, the Cambridge Wireless board member managing the project. "The future is a ‘converged IoT' world where real value can be obtained by sharing data and creating a sustainable marketplace for innovative applications and services."

 

via - FierceEnergy

 

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Intel’s automotive plans herald the ever connected future

Intel’s automotive plans herald the ever connected future | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"There are aspects to this internet of things that really are profoundly concerning, however. Privacy is one of them. No one can doubt that if all cars are all wi-fi or LTE connected, busybodies in government will no doubt want access to exactly where people are, where people have been, and where people are going. The upside, of course, is that licences, car tax and insurance will all be digitised too, and if a car doesn't check out on the police database, menaces driving without isurance or without passing a test will be easily identifiable."

 

via TechEye.net

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