Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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A Startup Envisions a Low-Power, Long-Range Internet of Things | MIT Technology Review

A Startup Envisions a Low-Power, Long-Range Internet of Things | MIT Technology Review | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Iotera expects businesses to use its technology to track everything from tools on construction sites to workers in dangerous places like oil rigs. Or people might use it to keep an eye on their pets. Iotera’s founders say two companies (which it won’t name) are trying it out. One is using it to help parents monitor their children’s whereabouts, and the other is tracking company-owned devices.

 

[idea cofounder Ben Wild] handed me a sensor tag in a 3-D-printed case about the size of a small matchbox. If you clipped one to your dog’s collar, it would occasionally log Fido’s location and report it back to a small access point connected to the Internet. From there, it would be punted to Iotera’s servers, and then to a website or mobile app. Under what Wild calls “typical operating conditions,” the tag’s battery would last up to five months.

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Seeking Cheaper Insurance, Drivers Accept Monitoring Devices

Seeking Cheaper Insurance, Drivers Accept Monitoring Devices | Web of Things | Scoop.it

LAST week, under my car’s dashboard, I installed a small wireless gadget that would monitor my driving. I wanted to see how it felt to have my driving behavior captured, sent to an insurance company and analyzed. More drivers, seeking discounts on auto insurance, are voluntarily doing just that.Insurers are offering these discounts as they aim to abandon the crude proxies they have long used to guess the likelihood that a particular policyholder will have an accident. These have included age, sex, marital status, miles driven (as reported by the driver) — and even credit scores, which can penalize those guilty of driving while poor.


Driving data is collected with a device that policyholders must be persuaded to install; it connects to the car’s computer system via a diagnostic port found in all cars since 1996. Such “user-based insurance,” the name for individualized pricing based on data collected from a vehicle, is spreading. Drivewise from Allstate is in 10 states; Drive Safe and Save, from State Farm, is in 16, with 11 more to be added next month; and Snapshot, from Progressive, is in 43.


Via Wildcat2030
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New Algorithm Predicts Your Future Movements Within 20 meters

New Algorithm Predicts Your Future Movements Within 20 meters | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A team of British researchers developed a new algorithm that can predict where you'll be within 24 hours, with 20-meter accuracy. This is a major improvement over other attempts to predict future movements, which have been based in cell phones and even in some cars. These systems track your location over time to determine patterns and habits throughout the days and weeks, figuring out likely destinations at certain periods. But what about when the pattern is disrupted?

 

via  Australian Popular Science

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Siri is so aloof; Saga wants to get to know you

Siri is so aloof; Saga wants to get to know you | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A new personal assistant app called Saga makes its way into the iOS App Store on Tuesday, and it wants to get to know users better than they know themselves. Like the recently unveiled Google Now, Saga tries to take the Siri concept a step further by proactively telling users what they need to know when they need to know. Doing this requires lots of data and algorithms capable of learning what users are really up to when they’re out and about.

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Forget ‘Cellphone,’ That’s a ‘Tracker’ in Your Pocket - Truthdig

Forget ‘Cellphone,’ That’s a ‘Tracker’ in Your Pocket - Truthdig | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Mobile phone service providers collect user information and share it with the government, to the tune of at least 1.3 million disclosures per year. What if our nomenclature reflected that?


Peter Maass and Megha Rajagopalan, digital privacy reporters for ProPublica, argue that cellphones function primarily as tools for keeping tabs on their owners. And our best hopes for addressing the dangers inherent in that fact begin with calling them by their rightful name.


—Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly. Follow him on Twitter: @areedkelly.

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The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide

The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Web of Things | Scoop.it

China, Japan and the European Union all invest about €1 billion a year in the Internet of Things; it is not known how much the US spends but the country also tags, scans and monitors goods and services. "The question of whether this is a desirable development or not is no longer relevant, the technology is there and we're using it," says IT specialist Arjan Geurts of Twynstra Gudde Advice Bureau.

 

The technical problems have been solved; an RFID or Radio Frequency Identification tag costs just five cents and wireless internet is in the ascendancy. The amount of information being sent is relatively small, which means there is very little chance of overloading the internet connection. Geurts: "the advent of the smartphone is the motor driving technological developments."

 

...

 

Asia is in the vanguard when it comes to the Internet of Things. Van 't Hof: "Chinese and Japanese users have integrated the technology very harmoniously. When China introduced electronic licence plates in order to monitor and regulate traffic, the authorities feared it would lead to riots as the technology could be used to restrict freedom of movement. However, there were no protests once the advantages of the system were explained and assurances about data accumulation were given. Transparency was the key."

 

...

 

The privacy issues don't worry companies very much, but security is very much an issue. Jaap-Henk Hoepman, a computer security and privacy expert attached to Radboud University in Nijmegen, says, "If something goes wrong, the damage is enormous. A company could be stuck with an entire shipment of perishable goods if the tracking system goes down or could be hit by digital industrial espionage."

 

"But that's no reason not to go ahead. We have to be aware of the risks. About 90 percent of the applications for this technology haven't even been thought of yet. And there will certainly be ways to use the technology that will make us wonder how we ever survived without them."

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Which sensors are coming to your next smartphone? | mobihealthnews

Which sensors are coming to your next smartphone? | mobihealthnews | Web of Things | Scoop.it

According to an interview with the general manager of the MEMS division of STMicroelectronics, Benedetto Vigna, smartphones will soon offer up a whole slew of new embedded sensors that could help to make mobile health services more accessible.

 

The introduction of extra sensors into consumer phones and other devices will really be just the first step into finding sensors everywhere according to Vigna. He states that in the next few years we will be seeing sensors in our socks, shoes, glasses and household fixtures like the garbage can — all aimed at measuring a person’s environmental health factors.

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Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data

Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Put all this data in the cloud, (privacy not included) and personal medicine becomes a reality, tracking our mood, skin temperatures and the analysis of correlated data becomes a new picture we have of ourselves, and a new image we can project unto the world.

 

“They’re really external extensions of our mind,” said Joseph Tranquillo, associate professor of biomedical and electrical engineering at Bucknell University. (referring to all our networked devices- CNN)

 

So, vast amounts of data, self-tracking, personal information stock exchange, our own memories in the cloud, implants under our skins transmitting the data continuously.

 

by @Wildcat2030

 


Via Peter Vander Auwera
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Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:58 AM
Thanks Peter, glad you liked the article
Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:59 AM
Thanks for sharing this, glad you liked the article
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Tracking everything, Placeme is the smartphone assistant of the future

Tracking everything, Placeme is the smartphone assistant of the future | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Placeme for iOS and Android may be both the scariest and amazingly futuristic app I've seen yet. The free software uses every sensor in your handset to track your activities, location and environment.
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Printed Sensors Could Help Save You From Spoiled Food

Printed Sensors Could Help Save You From Spoiled Food | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Thinfilm’s first-gen sensors will be able to cache data about the object itself, on the item itself. In this case, the sensors will record data concerning the object’s temperature history, tracking precise time, temperature and exposure information, and also displaying it in a low-power readout. The data within can be accessed as needed, insomuch it doesn’t need to be retrieved from the cloud, or require a constant wireless connection.

 

In the past, we’ve seen thin food sensors that change color as food begins to spoil. But this type of technology doesn’t retain data, and thus doesn’t provide information about the history of a product as it shipped.

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Changes to come with Internet of Things - Boston Business Journal

Changes to come with Internet of Things - Boston Business Journal | Web of Things | Scoop.it
And IoT will extend, expand and augment just about every conceivable installation of home, building, commercial, industrial and infrastructure automation. Smart meters may have been one of the first applications of IoT in energy, but it will soon be overshadowed by the impact(s) of devices as lowly as thermostats and light bulbs being elevated with intelligence and connected. Which brings me to this connection thing that seems to have so many people distracted. IoT solutions do NOT mean exclusively wireless.

To be sure, wireless connections will be a critical part of connecting the next generations of unattended devices, but, so too will wireline be an important part of the rich fabric of the IoT. What will they be connected to? Most importantly … YOU. As a private citizen, professional or public servant, your work, your play, your life, will be augmented by having some number of unattended devices monitoring – and perhaps controlling – one or more of the things, places, processes in your lives.

Boston Business Journal
Christopher Rezendes, President, INEX Advisors
18 Dec 2012
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How the Internet of Things could change Australian homes and businesses

Many of the barriers to adopting the Internet of Things in the home revolve around design issues. For example, Williams says a substantial amount of intelligence is required to enable alerts to be sent when the user wants to receive them – not when the events actually occur. (...)

 

The Internet of Things not only has potential in the home, but businesses could also benefit from it to find out what is happening in real time. For example, it could be used to track the exact location of parcels or drivers. (...)

 

Google has already made a move into this area, with the release in June this year of Google Maps Coordinate which allows businesses to track exactly where employees are located through Google Maps. (...)

 

There are numerous issues around privacy and security. For example, allowing a fridge to connect to the internet could create potential holes for hackers to get into personal networks. How readily consumers will accept these potential invasions of privacy remain to be seen, Williams says, but a tightening of online security will help.

 

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TedWomen: Amber Case on Cyborg Anthropology

Amber Case is a "cyborg anthropologist" studying how technology is affecting us, and how we in turn affect one another. Tweeting your lunch can have meaning.
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Dot the Connections: The Future of the Internet of Things | Broadband for America

Dot the Connections: The Future of the Internet of Things | Broadband for America | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Between 2011 and 2020 the number of connected devices globally will grow from 9 billion to 24 billion, according to The Connected Life: A USD4.5 trillion global impact in 2020. In this new report, R “Ray” Wang, a Forbes contributor, discusses the possibility of devices connected to, communicating through, and building relationships on the Internet. Over the next decade, Mr. Wang envisions:

 

Sensors will be even more ubiquitous. For instance, the camera at the traffic light and overseeing the freeway; those are sensors. That new bump in the parking space and new box on the street lamp; those are sensors. From listening for gun shots to monitoring a chicken coop, sensors are cropping up in every area of your life.

 

Machine to Machine [M2M] relationships will generate connected data that will affect many aspects of your life. Connected Data will be used to fine-tune predictives that will prevent crimes, anticipate your next purchase and take over control of your car to avoid traffic jams. The nascent form of this is already happening: Los Angeles and Santa Cruz police are using PredPol to predict & prevent crimes; location-aware ads popping up in your favorite smartphone apps; and Nevada and California are giving driver licenses to robotic cars.

 

Sustainability isn’t only about saving the planet. It’s also about saving money. Saving the planet, reducing dependence on polluting energy sources and reducing waste in landfills are all good things, but they aren’t part of the fiduciary responsibilities of most executives. However, Smart Buildings, recycling & composting, and Green IT all increase a company’s bottom line – all aspects of being a successful executive.

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A Phone that Knows Where You're Going

A Phone that Knows Where You're Going | Web of Things | Scoop.it

An algorithm can better predict your future movements by getting a little help from your friends.


Researchers in the U.K. have come up with an algorithm that follows your own mobility patterns and adjusts for anomalies by factoring in the patterns of people in your social group (defined as people who are mutual contacts on each other's smartphones).


All of the study participants lived within 30 miles of Lausanne, Switzerland, and were mainly "students, researchers, and people that are fairly predictable anyway." But the findings are considered noteworthy because they exploit the "synchronized rhythm of the city" for greater predictive insights.


The paper was part of a Nokia-sponsored Mobile Data Challenge grew out of another mid-2000s reality mining project sponsored by Nokia.

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Biosensors to monitor U.S. students' attentiveness

Biosensors to monitor U.S. students' attentiveness | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which has poured more than $4 billion into efforts to transform public education in the U.S., is pushing to develop an "engagement pedometer." Biometric devices wrapped around the wrists of students would identify which classroom moments excite and interest them -- and which fall flat.

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Track Where Your Stuff Comes From, Down To The Tiniest Part

Track Where Your Stuff Comes From, Down To The Tiniest Part | Web of Things | Scoop.it
If you have an iPhone, you probably know by this point a little bit about the factories where it was made. But what about everything else you own? Supply chains aren’t exactly easy for the average consumer to track.

Via The Asymptotic Leap
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P.A.U.S.E.S. — the Physical Autonomous Ubiquitous Social Engagement System

In a not too distant future where both objects and people are networked, and continually maintaining one’s online persona is of paramount importance, a new technology has emerged: systems that monitor our actions, interpret them and inform the the world about the important activities we are engaged in.

 

P.A.U.S.E.S. (the Physical Autonomous Ubiquitous Social Engagement System) is the world’s leading provider of this emergent technology.

 

Your P.A.U.S.E.S. device monitors your behavior and interactions, automatically generating a ‘micro-status’. This ‘micro-status’ is then displayed on your chest unit, as well as published to your online social profiles, sharing essential information with those in your physical and virtual vicinity.

 

Read more about the project here: mdp.lifeforms.ie/project/pauses/

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Dual RFID-ZigBee sensors to enable NFC applications for the Internet of Things | ECN: Electronic Component News

Zaragoza, Spain-based Libelium has launched a new RFID/NFC module for its Waspmote sensor platform. The new radio module extends Waspmote features allowing the sensor data to be used in Location Based Services (LBS), such as asset tracking, supply chain monitoring, intelligent shopping or access management.

 

By using RFID/NFC (passive sensors) along with ZigBee (active sensors), Libelium says asset tracking can be more accurate than ever along the whole supply chain process. Product management software such as ERPs will have access in real time to information related to remaining stock, storage and transportation conditions (temperature and humidity levels, vibrations, light exposure, etc), expiration dates and even consumer profiles, knowing time spent in front of a shelf or products picked up and not bought.

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Smart tag lets you print electronics on plastic

Smart tag lets you print electronics on plastic | Web of Things | Scoop.it
ThinFilm Electronics says it has assembled the pieces for a simple printed-on-plastic computing device with processing power, memory, and display that will enable 'smart objects' and an Internet of things.
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